“Behind the Smart World Research Lab” at Ars Electronica 2016

For most of us consumers electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets, notebooks, printers or microwaves are a fundamental and indispensable parts of our daily lives. As a result of rapid growth and constant innovation the electronic industry is the world’s fastest growing industry. The “Internet of things” is increasingly adding electronic devices onto our shopping list. Devices that are adding up to a 24h surveillance system that are tracking every aspect of our life and are containers for private data. The life cycle of these products are considerably short and when they break we do not know how to fix them. When it is cheaper to buy a new one than to repair the old one we move on to a upgraded model. But where do these electronic devices go to die? Some of them end up in regulated e-waste centrals in Europe, yet lot of them are dumped illegally on electronic-wastelands in developing countries where they become a serious environmental threat. A privacy issue is that these devices still contain personal data that can be reanimated and abused when falling into wrong hands. In the ‘Behind the smart world’ – research lab we question what happens to our electronic waste? What environmental and privacy threats exists? And how can we become more responsible users of technology.

Since 2010 Linda Kronman and Andreas Zingerle work as the KairUs artist duo and have focused on researching topics such as spam, scam and Internet fraud. In August 2014 our research had evolved to the stage that we needed to take a field trip to West Africa, where a considerable number of so called advance fee fraud originates. Rather than hunting down scammers in Internet cafés, we were interested to see which technological affordances or limitations the scammers were faced with in this part of the world. In our initial research we came across reports about an electronic waste dump called Agbogbloshie. In the middle of Ghana’s capital Accra, in this toxic wasteland by a lagoon, is where our electronics from developed countries are illegally dumped. There we bought 22 hard drives from old desktop and laptop computers, each cost around 3-5 USD.

Talking to recyclers at the e-waste dump

Price haggling for the hard drives

Once back in Austria our plan was to recover the data from the hard drives and offer the data and the hard drives as source material for artistic production. Together with the local net&culture hosting provider called servus.at we started a research lab. 

During two DIY-data recovery sessions we accessed data from three hard drives, just by plugging them in to a computer. This means that the data on the hard drives was not even deleted. Two hard drives were recovered by trying out open source tools such as PhotoRec, TestDisc and Partition Magic. Over an extended weekend we invited the international artists Emöke Bada (Hungary), Lilian Beidler (Switzerland), Joakim Blattmann (Norway), Simon Krenn (Austria), Fabian Kühfuss (Germany), Marit Roland (Norway), Matthias Urban, (Austria), Michael Wirthig (Austria) and Pim Zwier (Netherlands) to join us in Linz for a symposium with talks by Fieke Jansen (Tactical Tech), Dr. Michael Sonntag (Data forensic, JKU Linz) and Can Sinitras (data recovery). The artists who work with various mediums such as: soundart, interactive installations, videoart, performance and data visualizations spent the rest of the weekend discussing their concepts and prototyping first ideas. In the upcoming months we broadened our research and invited artists to write about their artistic research projects that deal with the saving, deleting and resurfacing of data. The outcome is a publication that available in a printed format as well digital in various formats. The publication includes essays by Fieke Jansen (Tactical Tech), Ivar Veermäe, Emilio Vavarella, Leo Selvaggio, Marloes de Valk, Research Team “Times of Waste”, Stefan Tiefengraber, Dr. Michael Sonntag and interviews with Audrey Samson and Michaela Lakova.

Behind the Smart World – saving, deleting and resurfacing of data as part of the AMRO Research Lab 2015 edited by: Kairus.org – Linda Kronman, Andreas Zingerle, published by: servus.at | process coordinator: Us(c)hi Reiter, layout by: lafkon.net

16 artworks from the ArtLab, the publication and an open call were curated into an exhibition for the 'Art Meets Radical Openness' - festival in Linz. The festival exhibition was co-curated by KairUs and Ushi Reiter and hosted by KunstRaum Goethestrasse xtd. From this exhibition 5 artworks were selected for a presentation during the Ars Electronica festival. A new collaborative work 'Mapping the Smart World' was started with the exhibiting artists and was presented on the interactive GeoPulse system provided by Ars Electronica Solutions.

Exhibition setup at Ars Electronica 2016 - PostCity

Observations: 'Behind the Smart World' at Ars Electronica 
                                   

Our works where exhibited as part of the 'LabOratorium' exhibition organized by Ars Electronica Solutions in the huge Post City building. The electronic waste provided by Austrian recycling company Müller-Guttenbrunn Gruppe, Raphael's e-waste yantra and the rather low tech artworks stood in contrast to the techno-utopian mindset that was apparent in the Post City. We found this an excellent context to question the rather hidden, negative impact, that the 'smart world' technology has on humans and the environment. Several exhibitions in the Post City including the 'LabOratorium' had alchemists and alchemy as an overall theme asking; "Who are the alchemists of our time?" or "What is the Gold of our time?". Also the second session of the symposium (FRI 9 September 2016, 2:30PM-5:50PM) was devoted to this topic in which among others Siegfried Zielinski and Verena Kuni discussed how the ethics of the alchemist play an important role in their creations. In her presentation (AN)ALCHEMIST Verena Kuni talked about reverse-engineering the four steps in the alchemist's search of gold, and reminded us how our consumer electronics are intertwined in complex networks that includes e-waste dumping, mining, poor labor conditions, etc. This talk supported well the perspective that the 'Behind the Smart World' Lab represents in the midst of the more utopian tech dreams.  In the following discussion Zielinski disliked the (AN) in front of the word ALCHEMIST, whereas he meant that the ethical perspective always was included in the alchemist practices. If we as artists, designers, researchers, engineers are to be seen as the alchemists of our time, we should also take time to be more aware of  the consequences technology has throughout its whole life cycle. Right now there is a lot to improve. It is not just the produced waste, or the toxic conditions of urban mining in some parts of the world that needs to be concidered. Some interesting discussions raised by the audience of the 'Behind the Smart World' exhibition included observations of the ruins of 'smart cities' or concerns of the amount of waste in space, that might hinder us to actually leave this planet, as so many scenarios portray it as the final salvation of the human race.

Link to the talks: http://www.aec.at/radicalatoms/en/live/ (Siegfried Zielinski 5:15:00, Verena Kuni 5:58:30)

Exhibited works

 


 Research lab video:https://vimeo.com/182564733

"Shell performance" by Martin Reiche

"Shell performance" by Martin Reiche

‘Shell Performance’ is an open-source software art installation that transforms an operating system into a performative space. The performance is fueled by the data that is available on all attached internal storage devices. The underlying software is a Linux shell script that is constantly scanning the contents of the hard drives for files. Running on the data retrieved from one of the ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drives, ‘Shell Performance’ questions integrity of data as much as issues of privacy, highlighting the questionable relationship we have with data and our urge to save everything to protect us from potential losses through malfunctions.

"Shopimation" by Fabian Kühfuß

"Shopimation" by Fabian Kühfuß

Artistic statement: When I looked into the first restored ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drive, I realised that there was no longer a folder structure. I decided to build up a new structure and it became apparent that a lot of thumbnails had been stored on the drive. These commercial thumbnails are placeholders for the aesthetical reflection of the ‘original owner’. ‘Shopimation’ is an approach to get closer to an unknown individual by researching his or her ‘aesthetic dreams’. As the techno-imagination of Vilém Flusser is an approach of coding a function of the meaning of techno-pictures, ‘Shopimation’ could be a code to translate the very private dream of who one would like to be.

 

"Forensic fantasies" by Linda Kronman and Andreas Zingerle (KairUs)

 

‘Forensic fantasies’ is a series of three artworks dealing with data breaches of private information. In the artworks we use data that was recovered from hard-drives that were dumped in Agbogbloshie, Ghana. Reports suggest, that at this e-waste dump, criminals extract data from hard-drives to demand payments from their owners.

"Forensic fantasies" by Linda Kronman and Andreas Zingerle (KairUs)

#1 Not a blackmail:

‘Not a Blackmail’ examines the possibility to blackmail a pre-owner of a hard-drive. Besides finding data of the owner it is crucial to be able to contact the person to express ones demands. From one hard-drive we could find out who it had belonged to. The artwork consists of one package, containing the recovered data and a letter.

Photo by: by ‘tom mesic’, Creative Common by-nc-nd license

#2 Found footage stalker:

‘Found footage stalkers’ takes a closer look at images found on one of the ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drives. Scanning through the private photos enables very personal insights into the life of the pre-owners of this hard-drive. It is similar to the feeling of stalking someone unknown online, one starts to create a story to these fragmented digital representations. By presenting the photos in an album we approach the material as ‘found footage’, the practice of gathering material flea markets for remixing and creating new artworks. Hence the artwork confronts earlier practices of using ‘found footage’ with now digital materials found amongst our trash.

Photo by: Makoto Saito, Fuze.dj

#3 Identity theft:

‘Identity theft’ focuses on the phenomena of romance scamming. Scammers conduct id-theft by copying bulks of images of people to create fraudulent profiles on social media platforms. The scammers pose to be in love with their victim and after gaining their trust they lure them to give gifts and money. One of the ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drives contained several images of ladies. We suspect that the images were copied to this hard-drive to create and sustain fraudulent profiles. In this artwork 18 of the fraudulent online profiles using the same images found on the hard-drive are combined with Nollywood clips that thematises the topic of romance scams.

 

"Recycling Yantra" by Raphael Perret

The installation ‘Recycling Yantra’ is on one hand a series of videos, documenting the informal e-waste recycling in Delhi, and on the other a contemporary interpretation of the tantric symbol ‘Smara-hara Yantra’ (Remover of Desire). The videos show how computers are collected, repaired, traded and taken apart over several steps, until all components are fed back into the production of new goods again. The yantra, composed of materials collected from the recycling process, is an energy diagram, comparable with a talisman which, in its original meaning, is supposed to help people free themselves from desire and the urges of consumer culture.

Photo by: by ‘tom mesic’, Creative Common by-nc-nd license

Photo by: by ‘tom mesic’, Creative Common by-nc-nd license

"Headcrash" by Michael Wirthig

The most interesting thing of the ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drives is for Michael Wirthig the magnetic disc itself. It is the physical place where all kind of personal data is saved on. In former works I’ve made various studies about the relationship between inner and outer worlds. Therefore I dissected the hidden world of a number of different appliances to turn them inside out, e.g. disassembling machines. For ‘Headcrash’ I extracted the discs of 2 Ghana hard-drives and explored the surface with a microscope. 1500 photos of the inside and outside influences of the discs, like scratches or dust result in a 1 min tour de force about the inner world of these drives.

Photo by: Michael Wirthig (videostill)

Collaborative work "Mapping the smart world"

‘Mapping the Smart World’ examines the life cycles of consumer electronics and network technologies. By mapping the key locations for mining, refining, production, storage and the urban mining of e-waste we want to bring forth the complex chains of development and production that enables our networked lives. The ‘Mapping the Smart World’ reveals locations of both stunning R&D, increasingly effective use of resources as well as dystopian working conditions and ecological disasters. We were able to show a first ‘work in progress’ with the Geopulse system that Ars Electronica Solutions produced for ESA. To make the future research process more participatory, we want to port the map to an open source system and collaborate with other research groups.

 

 

Links:
KairUs Art+Research: http://www.kairus.org
servus.at: http://www.servus.at
The "Behind the smart world" publication (epub, pdf, web version): http://publications.servus.at/2016-Behind_the_Smart_World/
"Behind the smart world" research blog: http://research.radical-openness.org/2015/
Symposium II: The Alchemists of our time: http://www.aec.at/radicalatoms/en/symposium2/
Fabian Kühfuß: http://www.kuehfuss.com
Martin Reiche: http://martinreiche.com
Raphael Perret: http://raphaelperret.ch
Michael Wirthig: https://www.radical-openness.org/vortragende/michael-wirthig

This HUB Post written and submitted by Linda Kronman & Andreas Zingerle

 

Additional credits: ‘Behind the Smart World’ – a project by Linda Kronman & Andreas Zingerle (KairUs) realised the first time in cooperation with servus.at as a research lab and an exhibition for the Art Meets Radical Openness 2016 festival in Linz, Austria.

 

Material sponsoring (e-waste): MGG – Müller Guttenbrunn Group, Amstetten (Austria).

 

Assistant Professor in Physical Computing at UCSD

The Department of Visual Arts at UC San Diego invites applications for an artist with a robust exhibition record who works with physical computing platforms and control systems for installation, robotics and public environments; computationally directed methods of fabrication and simulation; and other emerging areas of artistic production which physically manifest computational system interactions with human, social and material conditions. We especially seek artists with conceptually driven practices who use computing in a way that intersects with other departmental artistic practices, such as studio, performance, installation, or media, as well as with Speculative Design and Art History and Theory.

The Department of Visual Arts offers undergraduate degrees in Studio, Media, Speculative Design, Art History and the Interdisciplinary Computing in the Arts Major (ICAM), as well as, at the graduate level, an MFA and a PhD in Art History, Theory and Criticism which includes a concentration in Art Practice. The Physical Computing Artist is a research and teaching position centered in the ICAM, a program intermixing art, music and computer science to provide students with the basis of creating new forms of art which arise out of the affordances of computational systems. Teaching will encompass the entire curricular range from large undergraduate lecture courses, to intermediate production and technique courses, advanced undergraduate production and critique courses, and graduate courses for MFA and Art Practice students. Courses would include such areas as the use of microcontrollers in art,
3D fabrication and computing systems for social action. All Department faculty are expected to advise, work with, and serve on the committees of MFA students in all areas and also work with and serve on the committees of PhD students.

Assistant Professor appointments are open to emerging artists whose exhibition track record shows a trajectory for developing a national and international reputation. Since quality teaching is required for advancement, applicants with teaching experience are preferred. Applicants should possess an MFA and/or PhD.

Rank and salary commensurate with qualifications and experience based on UC pay scales.

To apply: All applicant materials including referee information should be submitted via UCSD Academic Personnel Recruit On-Line site at https://apol-recruit.ucsd.edu/apply/JPF01202.

Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2016 and continue until the position is filled, however, to guarantee full consideration by the search committee, applications must be fully completed and received by December 15, 2016.

Applications must include a cover letter with a description of research, training, and teaching experience; a curriculum vitae with degrees, academic and other employment positions, and evidence of work in the field with links to relevant websites (if any); teaching evaluations (if available); three letters of reference requested through the AP On-Line Recruit site; provide a link to online portfolio that is specifically curated for the search committee, prioritized with your most accomplished work in PDF format that can be uploaded into the AP On-Line Recruit site; and a summary of past or potential contributions to diversity (see http://facultyequity.ucsd.edu/Faculty-Applicant-C2D-Info.asp);

UC San Diego is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer with a strong institutional commitment to excellence through diversity. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to gender, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status.

INTERNATIONAL OPEN CALL – IMPACT16 – Symposium and Public Presentations

How and where do alternative realities come about both in and between different fields of knowledge? How can we productively uncover contradictory “rift zones” in today’s world? What kind of frameworks for action can we cultivate?

  • 4-DAY SYMPOSIUM with extensive interdisciplinary exchange
  • 30 PARTICIPANTS (artists, scientists and experts from other varied fields)
  • 3 ONE-DAY WORKSHOPS with 3 ARTIST COLLECTIVES

impact16 is aimed at artists and advanced students, practitioners and theoreticians from the natural and social sciences, technology, architecture and urban planning, philosophy, political activism, as well as from the visual and performance arts.

APPLICATIONS UNTIL 10. OCTOBER 2016

Online application form: www.pact-zollverein.de/en/platforms/ impact-application Limited number of 30 participants. Selection is based on the quality of submitted applications (CV, letter of motivation and, where applicable, work samples). The working language is English.

Assistant Professor of Creative Arts and Technologies at SUNY Polytechnic Institute

The Department of Communication and Humanities, College of Arts and Sciences at SUNY Polytechnic Institute seeks to hire an Assistant Professor whose research and practice addresses the intersections between the creative arts and technologies. The preferred candidate will be able to work at the levels of theory and practice, integrating insights and applications in the arts, humanities, and technologies to engage students to become creative thinkers, practitioners, and problem-solvers. The successful applicant will develop and teach a range of undergraduate and graduate courses that encourage students to explore and develop their creative, aesthetic, and technical abilities and that contribute to the degree programs and general education mission of the Department.

The Department offers a B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies, a B.S. in Communication and Information Design, a B.S. in Interactive Media and Game Design, and an M.S. in Information Design and Technology, and provides a range of general education in the arts and humanities. SUNY Polytechnic is developing a state-of-the-art makerspace and collaborative interdisciplinary learning environment and is seeking candidates who can leverage these facilities to explore and capitalize upon the intersections between the arts and technologies.

Persons interested in the above position should submit a resume, contact information for three work-related references, letter of application, and the SUNY Polytechnic employment application to www.sunypoly.edu/employment.


SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) is New York’s globally recognized, high-tech educational ecosystem. As the world’s most advanced, university-driven research enterprise, SUNY Poly boasts more than $43 billion in high-tech investments, over 300 corporate partners, and maintains a statewide footprint.

SUNY Poly is dedicated to the goal of building a diverse and inclusive teaching, research, and working environment. Potential applicants who share this goal, especially underrepresented minorities, women, persons with disabilities, and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

Assistant Professor of Media Arts, Tenure Track at Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University

The Visual Arts Department of the Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University invites applications for a full-time tenure-track Assistant Professor position in the area of Media to begin September 2017. The position entails teaching undergraduate and graduate studio and seminar classes at all levels, from introductory to advanced; curriculum development; and committee service to the Department and University. The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to the vision, development, and growth of the Media Area. The candidate should have a demonstrated commitment to teaching, the potential for academic leadership, and the ability to work in an interdisciplinary arts environment. Candidates should be active in their field, with a strong record of professional achievement. Candidates should also have an expansive and deep knowledge and proficiency in the techniques, practices, histories and theories of media art as well as the field of art and technology. Areas of specialization may include sound, interactive media, animation, and other intersections between art, media, and technology.

Position information can be found here: https://jobs.rutgers.edu/postings/31552

The Visual Arts Department provides both disciplinary focus and an environment for interdisciplinary exploration, as well as access to the rich intellectual resources of a major research institution. This breadth enables students to graduate with the skills and thinking necessary for careers in today’s diverse and changing art world. BFA, BA, and MFA degrees in Visual Arts are offered with undergraduate concentrations in Design, Drawing, Media, Painting, Photography, Print, and Sculpture. Proximity to New York and Philadelphia gives students access to a faculty of renowned professional artists and designers, prestigious museums and galleries, visiting artists and critics, and profoundly affects the exchange of ideas within the Visual Arts Department. Visual Arts graduates become professional artists and designers, and work in creative environments such as museums, galleries, schools, and universities and industries including film, television and advertising.

CURRENTS New Media Festival 2017 Call for Submissions

This is a call for our 2017 show June 9th-25th 2017 in Santa fe, New Mexico. CURRENTS is a non-profit organization and there is no charge for admission to the festival. Last year over we counted over 7,000 visitors to our festival events.

Some artists who are accepted into the festival are eligible for full coverage of lodging, travel, and shipping costs.

This years categories include:
• New Media Installations,
• Outdoor Video and New Media Installations,
• Single Channel Video and Animation,
• Multimedia Performance,
• Fulldome,
• Experimental or Interactive Documentary,
• Web-Art / Art-Gaming / Mobile Device Apps,
• Virtual Reality Environments,
• Robotics,
• Digitally Generated Objects (ie. 3D Printing)
• Interactive Installations for Children

For more information about our festival and our submission guidelines:
https://currentsnewmedia.org/festivals/currents-new-media-2017/


CURRENTS is an international NEW MEDIA art festival produced by the non-profit organization Parallel Studios. We showcase a variety of art that is pushing the boundaries of art and technology, experimental films, installations, and performances. CURRENTS brings together New Media artists in an atmosphere that fosters open exchange and professional networking.

CURRENTS serves as a platform for artistic experimentation and generates exploration into all forms of new media art, while providing the public with an opportunity to experience an outstanding selection of innovative work. Committed to making this extraordinary work available to everyone, the CURRENTS Festivals are free to the public.

Travel Shorts a Moving Image Festival for SECAC 2016

TRAVEL SHORTS A Moving Image Festival
SECAC Conference 2016
Call For Work

Calling for video, animation, motion graphic works that in some way deals with the theme of travel. Works are to be no longer than 10 minutes and may include sound. The selected works for the festival will be exhibited during the SECAC Conference at the Armory Mezzanine Gallery, Virginia Tech and on the bus ride between Roanoke and Blacksburg, VA to attend the keynote address by Lynn Hershman Leeson, at the Moss Arts Center’s theater in Blacksburg on Oct 21, 2016.

HOW TO ENTER
Email a vimeo or youtube link to simpat@vt.edu using TRAVEL SHORTS as subject.
Submit entries prior to 11:59 PM EDT August 31, 2016
Entry is free
Up to three entries per person is permitted.
Late entries will not be reviewed.
On acceptance uncompressed files will be called for via WeTransfer (a free transfer service up to 2 GB)

ELIGIBILITY
Travel Shorts, A Moving Image Festival is open to all. However, membership to SECAC is required within 10 days of acceptance to the festival. For membership information, visit the Membership page on the SECAC website: secacart.org.

JUROR
Dr. Simone Paterson, Associate Professor of New Media and Chair of Undergraduate Studies in Creative Technologies at The School of Visual Arts, Virginia Tech.

SCHEDULE
Submission deadline August 31, 2016
Notification of acceptance Sep 18, 2016
Deadline for selected work via WeTransfer Sep 30, 2016

Travel Shorts, A Moving Image Festival
Armory Mezzanine Gallery, Virginia Tech, SECAC Conference October 19-22, 2016.
Bus ride between Roanoke and Blacksburg, VA Friday Oct 21, 2016.

 


SECAC 2016 - Roanoke, VA
The city of Roanoke, Virginia, Virginia Tech, and Hollins University are proud to host the 73rd annual SECAC meeting October 19-22, 2016. Kevin Concannon, Director of the School of Visual Arts and Professor, Art History, at Virginia Tech, serves a conference director.

Join us in the beautiful mountains of Southwest Virginia for SECAC 2016. Sessions will take place at the official conference hotel, the Hotel Roanoke & Conference Center. The Hotel Roanoke, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996, is located in the heart of vibrant downtown Roanoke within easy walking distance of the Taubman Museum of Art, The Harrison Museum of African American Culture, and the O Winston Link Museum, and many restaurants and bars.

Evening excursions to Virginia Tech and Hollins on Thursday and Friday evenings include the SECAC 2015 Artist's Fellowship exhibition opening, Juried Exhibition, and keynote speaker Lynn Hershman Leeson, who will be speaking in the Moss Arts Center’s spectacular Snohetta-designed theater on the Virginia Tech campus. The annual SECAC Awards luncheon will be held on Thursday.

Visiting Assistant Professor Visual Studies – Digital 2016-17 at Grand Valley State University

Grand Valley State University

QUALIFICATIONS:
• MFA (or comparable degree) with in-depth working knowledge in the use of digital media in art and design.
• Deep practice and knowledge in the use of time-based and interactive media.
• Familiarity and facility with theory relevant to Visual Studies, New Media, Foundations, and Contemporary Art and Design.
• Ability to organize and maintain a healthy studio environment with engaging studio activities and projects.
• Successful candidates will be able to work in digital media in relation to other studio and intellectual ways of knowing and working. Visual Studies is organized to operate integrally with other visual and academic methodologies within the department, University, and community.
• Awareness and experience in the formation, presentation and critique of culture.
• Knowledge and skill to teach one or more of the six Foundations courses.

RESPONSIBILITIES:
Teach three courses per semester in a NASAD accredited undergraduate program with approximately 300 majors. Teaching responsibilities will include Visual Studies courses (primarily Time Studio and Interactive Studio), a foundation course about contemporary practices Art 153 Making and Meaning in Art and Design, and other courses as needed: Drawing 1 and 2, 2D Design, 3D Design, or Color and Design.

SALARY:
Competitive; commensurate with rank and experience; one year contract, renewable up to three years.

HOW TO APPLY:
Send an email expressing your interest in the position to wittenbp@gvsu.edu. Include link(s) to online samples of work and samples of student work. Attach a CV, a list of 3 references, and any other pertinent documents (letter, teaching statement, artist statement). Please include an overview of time-based and interactive processes and technologies indicating level of proficiency for each (familiar, competent, expert).

DEADLINE:
Position is open until filled. Given the tight timeline send your materials asap: applications will be reviewed immediately upon receipt. Send by August 5th to assure full consideration.


Visual Studies is a studio emphasis area in the Department of Art and Design at GVSU that uses innovative pedagogies to address rich contexts in contemporary art practice. In Time Studio, Interactive Studio and Image Studio students engage the prevalence of digital media and networks in human experience by making and thinking critically about these media. In Civic Studio, Curatorial Studio and Space Studio students design and implement special contexts and engagements to learn about human experience and power. These six courses make up the core Visual Studies BFA curriculum, one of the BFA studio emphasis areas in the Art and Design Department. For more information about Visual Studies see: http://visualstudies.art.gvsu.edu.

Fermenting at Flux (Live and Active Cultures: Part 2)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence

Over the course of my 5-month residency at Flux Factory in Long Island City, New York, I am recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers), as well as outside artists collaborating with Flux for its various public programs. Through its studio residency program, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.

For this interview, I invited Maya Jeffereis to talk about her current project, Fallout Shelter which stages a moral values exercise developed by the US Navy. Maya invited visitors to participate in the exercise at Flux Factory on July 14, as one of the featured collaborators for Interdependence DayFallout Shelter is on view at the Soho20 Gallery in Brooklyn until July 25 and the New Britain Museum of American Art through September 11. 

maya-jeffereis-fallout-shelter-2016

C: How did your Fallout Shelter project come about?
M: I found a U.S. Navy training manual at an abandoned military site in Puerto Rico. Inside was this exercise on moral values: a hypothetical apocalyptic scenario with ten people occupying a fallout shelter. As participants, you are on a civil defense committee appointed by the President and it's your job to decide which six occupants should remain in the shelter in order to rebuild society and which four have to leave, because there is only space for six. The exercise describes each occupant by very problematic statements that include information about age, race, gender, sexuality, profession, and ideology.

22

Text taken from the fallout shelter exercise:

  1. Thirty-six year old female physician, known to be a confirmed racist.
  2. Marine drill instructor, 37, white, accused of brutality to recruits -- has a revolver.
  3. Black militant, 35 year old biological researcher (PhD).
  4. Biochemist, 62 years old, white male.
  5. Olympic athlete, 26, decathlon champion, Asian female.
  6. Hollywood starlet, 27 year old white female, known drug user.
  7. Third year male medical student -- homosexual, 28.
  8. Sixteen year old girl, pregnant, questionable IQ, high school dropout.
  9. Thirty year old Catholic priest, Hispanic.
  10. Thirty-eight year old carpenter, and “Mr. Fix-It” man. Served seven years for pushing narcotics, has been out of jail for 7 months.

C: How did you take the ideas from that document and transform them into a work?
M: The most interesting aspect of the exercise was the conversation about identity politics and values that it opened up. I invited participants to my studio to complete the exercise and make their own decisions about whom to keep and whom to remove. They improvised on camera playing three roles: a member of the civil defense committee discussing their decisions, an occupant they chose to keep, and an occupant they chose to get rid of. In the role of the fallout shelter occupants, they would make a video confessional speech about why they should remain in the shelter, with the idea that their speech would be sent to the civil defense committee making decisions.

C: How does the two-channel format influence our understanding of the content in the speeches?
M: The video is edited together with the civil defense committee members on the left channel and the fallout shelter occupants on the right. By having the same performer play three distinct roles, you get a conflict of interest. For example, you might see a member of the civil defense committee on the left talking about why we should get rid of the Hollywood Starlet but then on the right, you see the same performer making an argument in defense of herself. Many different performers play each of the occupants, so you might see 10 different performers playing the role of the Marine Drill Instructor. I wanted to create a collective identity for each of the 10 occupants that would represent the range of arguments for or against each occupant. This would expose latent biases, because you're having a very direct and open conversation about race and identity politics and your own values. You are also building your own conception of a utopia by doing this thought experiment of what it would mean to rebuild society. What kind of society are you building? What do you hope to bring to a new society and what do you wish to leave behind?

C: How many people participated and did they write their own scripts?
M: About 35 people participated in the video and all of the performers improvised their own parts. When directing the video, I offered some general guidelines but tried not to influence what they said because it was about what each person brought to their own performance.

C: You don’t guide them as to whether they should use their own value system or approach it like a philosophical exercise?
M: I’m interested in this gray area between the performance of the self and the performance of a character. Where do you draw the line between the two? When performing a character, you are calling on personal experiences and external experiences that you have observed or absorbed through culture and media and these experiences become internalized. When performing your own identity, I think of Erving Goffman’s research on how an individual acts differently in different contexts, constantly adapting to various situations. The question of real versus fictional can be asked of both the performer and the performed.

C: In reading the document, there is an absurdity to the exercise that makes it hard to take seriously, but there is something about watching people act it out that feels surreal and frightening in its plausibility.
M: I think of the occupants of the fallout shelter as archetypes: you have The Doctor, The Soldier, the Academic, The Athlete, The Movie Star, and so on. Each archetype may have varying degrees of relatability, depending on your own background. For example, the Female Physician is described as a “confirmed racist.” How do we interpret this information, especially when it seems to present a conflict of interest between a doctor who swears the Hippocratic Oath and a confirmed racist who may refuse to treat certain patients? When the participants play the occupants, they begin to humanize these characters, giving insight into their personalities, their flaws, and their motivations. Perhaps it’s this sense of empathy imbued in the performance or conveyed to the viewer that is unsettling, because we’re confronting morally ambiguous and ambivalent issues. But that’s the great thing about this thought experiment: it gets us to have very frank and candid discussions about difficult topics, like race, policing, and gun control--issues that we’re facing right at this very moment.

Maya Jeffereis is a video, performance, and installation artist based in New York. Her work has been shown most recently at SOHO20 Gallery, Flux Factory, and NARS Foundation. She holds a MFA from Hunter College and a BFA and BA from the University of Washington. Maya is also the Public Engagement Associate of Adult and Access Programs at the Guggenheim.

Christina Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Haverford College in Pennsylvania and currently an artist-in-residence at Flux Factory in New York.

 

Fermenting at Flux: Live & Active Cultures (Part 1)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence

Over the course of my 5-month residency at Flux Factory I will be recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers). Through its studio residency program in Long Island City, NY, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.  The next exhibition opening on July 20th in Flux's gallery is "Thinking Like a Machine," by Niki Passath.

Interview with Niki Passath

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C: Tell me about your opening on July 20th.

N: It’s a hybrid event, both workshop and exhibition. The robotics workshop starts at noon and finishes when the opening reception begins, at 6pm. We will experiment with the machines we have made as a performance during the opening.

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C: What are the materials you are using?

N: Styrofoam, wooden skewers, straws, mobile phone batteries, and e-waste.

[Recently Niki has been making robots that paint]

C: How do you see the action of the robot painting as cultural critique?

N: I propose new ways for looking at technology.  For example, a lot of people think, you can do anything with a good programming language. In reality, you are limited to what the producer of that language could conceptualize.

C: The robot acts as an intermediary, creating distance between you and the final painting. I assume you are thinking about technology mediating relationships and how we connect emotionally or disconnect.

N:  How we communicate and use technology nowadays, is the wrong way because we connect, mainly over software which has a reason. That reason is to make money. It might be a social software but the intention is different. There used to be couch surfing for free. The next idea was Airbnb, which was a good idea, but businesses were destroyed and in many cities the rents have increased.

C: It points to a global issue, of prioritizing short term consumer experience over long term sustainability.

N: It’s subjectivism, vs objectivism. The idea that everything that I would like to have and consume is inherently good.

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C: The lines these days are a bit blurred, but a lack of specific function is often inherent to what defines art, as opposed to design or craft. How do you think about the function of your robots? Aren’t they unnecessary?

N: I come from the classical music world. An instrument is a very elaborate technological device. Even when you use that machine to create music, you interpret the composition. The musician, is a very small element in the whole system. There could be a billion musicians, but the way they interpret the work is special.

C: The point is not to make a painting.

N: I tried it, it’s not something that I like. I really enjoy the traces of the robots, they take two to three hours. It might be the same amount of time for me to make it myself, but I prefer if the robot makes it. It’s a very intense, emotional time for me. The reason for having the robots paint, is the connection to the idea of trace and cave painting. Everything the robots do is recorded by the trace, it is the abstract form of each robot's movement.

C: You create the robots with some intentional element of failure?

N: Yes, I realized that if there are small mistakes in the form, the behavior changes and it becomes very lifelike. My theory is that every great idea came out of a misunderstanding of something.

C: Are you open about the code and the technical process?

N: I come out of the open source world. If you look at the score for a piece of music, that is the source code of the piece. In some cases, I write code onto the gallery wall. Calling it a score can help you see code differently. It’s more interesting to create scores for machines, than a very dry, technical code.

Niki_paint_robot2

C: The world of technology is still very male dominated, and your robots are working with the abstract expressionist language, which is also a male dominated language. Specifically this idea of the paintbrush as phallus is a reminder of this.

N: I’m looking forward to the conversation here in the United States, because Jackson Pollock is not so important in my world and I’m not coming out of that tradition. I was never a painter. I’m interested in the gesture, but not what a painter thinks is a gesture.

C: Your work reminds me of Yves Klein, with the traces of  bodies on canvas, performance in the gallery space, musical scores, neo-dada style happenings; also Nam June Paik releasing a robot into the street to be hit by a car.  It’s an event, alive and organic.

N: There’s no instructions for the evening. If you don’t look closely it would seem like a normal opening reception, with the artist present. It’s more subtle and I wouldn’t want it to be otherwise.

Niki Passath teaches Interface Design at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Christina Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Haverford College in Pennsylvania. Both are currently artists-in-residence at Flux Factory in New York, where Niki will be leading a robotics workshop on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, followed by an opening reception and exhibition: http://www.fluxfactory.org/events/robot-making-workshop/

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Call – iDEAS Exhibition 2016

iDEAS 16 is an international exhibition which explores current ideas and processes in hybrid form, digital art, design, and new media. The iDEAS exhibition coincides with the fourteenth annual International Digital Media and Arts Association (iDMAa) conference, to be held on the campus of Winona State University in Winona, Minnesota, from October 5th-8th. All entries will be selected based on a juried body of professional artists including the highly respected, Christiane Paul and Dene Grigar.

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES EXTENDED – August 15th, 2016 (12:00am CST)

When
Wednesday, October 5, 2016 at
9:00AM CDT
-to-
Saturday, October 8, 2016 at
1:00PM CDT

Click on the link below to find out more
http://idmaa.org/conferences/ideas2016/

Submit work!
http://idmaa.org/conferences/ideas2016/

Apply Now!

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us. We're looking forward to seeing you there!
Dr. Sherman Finch
iDEAS Chair
sfinch@tamu.edu


iDMAa was founded in early 2004 by a group of 15 universities. iDMAa is dedicated to serving educators, practitioners, scholars, and organizations with interests in digital media.

Around the world, universities and colleges are creating new programs and departments to teach and conduct research in Digital Media and Digital Arts. These programs are emerging from partnerships of Art, Computer Science, Communications-Radio/TV-Journalism, English, Music, Theater, Film and other disciplines. These programs often don’t fit within the neat and tidy confines of traditional university structures. Thus, their creators and champions often forge interdisciplinary partnerships to create opportunities, attract money, and stimulate explosions of creativity.

CALL FOR ENTRIES | Materials: Hard + Soft International Contemporary Craft Competition & Exhibition

The Greater Denton Arts Council announces the opening of its 2017 Call for Entries for the 30th Annual Materials: Hard + Soft Contemporary Craft Exhibition. This exhibition celebrates the evolving field of contemporary craft and the innovation of artists who push the boundaries of their chosen media. Recognized as one of the premier craft exhibitions in the United States, this year we are thrilled to be partnering with the National Endowment for the Arts to expand this national exhibition to now include international artists. Approximately 70 works will be selected for exhibition by juror JoAnn Edwards, Executive Director of the Museum of Craft and Design in San Francisco, California. Of the works selected, Juror Awards in amounts of $1000, $750, $500, and $250 will be awarded.

Online submissions and prospectus available at dentonarts.com/materialshardandsoft

SUBMISSION DEADLINE | September 30, 2016

2017 EXHIBITION | February 4 – May 6, 2017 at the Patterson-Appleton Arts Center in Denton, Texas. Inquires may be directed to the Arts Council at (940) 382-2787 or exhibit@dentonarts.com


The mission of the Greater Denton Arts Council is to support, promote, and encourage the arts in the Greater Denton Area.

The Greater Denton Arts Council has served the Denton Community for 45 years. The Arts Council provides foundational support for Denton’s artists and community arts organizations and collaborates frequently with area universities, the Denton Independent School District, and the City of Denton. The Arts Council presents a full schedule of programs and exhibitions in its two flagship facilities in historic downtown Denton, the Patterson-Appleton Center Arts Center and the Campus Theatre.

Lecturer or Professor of Practice, Writing for Games at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Post: One Year Full-time, Non Tenure-Track Position in Writing for Games

Deadline information: Screening of applicants will begin immediately, and will continue until the position is filled.

The Program in Games and Simulation Arts and Sciences (GSAS) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY invites applications for a one-year faculty position as Lecturer or Professor of Practice in Writing for Games. We seek a writer with a creative practice in storytelling through games and a passion for teaching the next generation of game designers. The successful candidate will bring expertise in writing and design for games, including digital or analog games; mainstream, serious or indie games; or closely related forms of interactive fiction and narrative. The appointment is full time, non tenure-track, as Lecturer or Professor of Practice in the Department of Communication and Media with primary teaching responsibilities in beginning, intermediate, and advanced courses in game writing and narrative design.

For appointment as Lecturer, candidates must have a terminal degree (MFA, PhD, or foreign equivalent) in a relevant discipline and evidence of successful teaching ability at the college level. For appointment as Professor of Practice, candidates must have a Terminal degree (MFA, PhD, or foreign equivalent) in a relevant discipline or comparable professional qualification in a senior role with at least 10 years of experience, and evidence of successful college-level teaching ability or mentorship.

Founded in 1824, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is the nation’s oldest technological university. With approximately 5,000 undergraduate and 2,500 graduate students from across the country and around the world, the university offers more than 145 programs at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels. Rensselaer is located in Troy, NY, the heart of the "Tech Valley" region of the Hudson River Valley. The university’s Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) offers scholars and students opportunities for creative interdisciplinary research in the arts, performance technologies, science, and engineering. Games and Simulation Arts and Sciences is an interdisciplinary program housed in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, with faculty and courses from multiple departments including Arts, Cognitive Science Communication and Media, Computer Science, and Science and Technology Studies. Launched in 2008, it has been regularly ranked as one of the top 20 games programs in the North America, with one of the only game writing concentrations in the world.

The Department of Communication and Media at Rensselaer is an internationally recognized center for interdisciplinary education and research. Our graduate and undergraduate programs prepare students to understand traditional and emerging communication technologies from a variety of perspectives, including rhetorical studies, media studies, human-computer interaction, game studies, technical communication, professional and creative writing, cross-cultural communication, and graphic design. Students learn to use words and images to communicate powerfully with a critical understanding of how media operate across global cultures.

Games and Simulation Arts and Sciences is an interdisciplinary program housed in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, with faculty and courses from multiple departments including Arts, Cognitive Science Communication and Media, Computer Science, and Science and Technology Studies. Launched in 2008, it has been regularly ranked as one of the top 20 games programs in the North America, with one of the only game writing concentrations in the world.

Screening of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. To apply, please submit a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, up to three (3) portfolio samples and three (3) letters of reference at: http://rpijobs.rpi.edu/postings/3785. Applicants with more than three portfolio samples are encouraged to use their letters of interest to advise the reader that more samples are available upon request.
We welcome candidates who will bring diverse intellectual, geographical, gender and ethnic perspectives to Rensselaer’s work and campus communities. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

Call For Essays – Cinematic Fixations

The Cinematic Fixations website is seeking short 500 word essays about the images in the database. The essays will be featured on the website, and eventually collected in a book. Topics for discussion can be the use of a signature color palette by a filmmaker (for example, Wes Anderson's fondness for earthy browns and his use of blue tinting to indicate climax), or color as indicator of location (think The Wizard of Oz's Emerald City and yellow brick road), or the shift from light to dark (as in the horror classics, Halloween and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre). The essays can also break this mold and be a discussion of the author's favorite cinematic moment, or a criticism of the project itself.

To get involved or submit essays, email Jeffrey Moser at jsmoser@mail.wvu.edu. This project is made possible through a grant from the Myer's foundation, and the support of the School of Art and Design, College of Creative Arts, and the Reed College of Media at West Virginia University.

The Cinematic Fixations website is a visual database of film. It currently contains over 1000 film fixations, from George Melies to George Miller. The project invites academics, filmmakers, artists, computer programmers and movie buffs to collaborate in creating a complete visual database of film. Each fixation is created by arranging every frame of a film into a grid with a ratio of 3:1. No matter the length of a film the fixations are standardized so that films across genres and of varying duration can be compared and contrasted. The result is a color-banded timeline that reveals the underlying palette and the pattern of light variation of a film. The website is designed as a tool for researchers, critics, and students of film to investigate the use of color by filmmakers to augment narratives, indicate changes in psychological or physical space, and signify climax.

Call for papers: Digital Fabrication @ FATE 2017

FATE (Foundations in Art: Theory and Education) 16th Biennial Conference
Hosted by the KCAI (Kansas City Art Institute) Foundations Department
April 6-8, 2017

FATE is a national association dedicated to the promotion of excellence in the development and teaching of college-level foundation courses. A full list of sessions for the 2017 conference can be found at http://www.foundations-art.org.

With the conference theme "To the Core and Beyond" in mind, session chairs Tom Burtonwood (The School of the Art Institute of Chicago) and Taylor Hokanson (Columbia College Chicago) seek abstracts from educators who promote digital fabrication in foundations level courses and beyond. This session invites papers addressing best practices for introducing, integrating and establishing digital fabrication into the art and design foundations curriculum, especially research that addresses experimental materials and collapses boundaries between disciplines. We aim to facilitate debate around a set of tools that is growing more common in our field. How have a few years of access to the technology changed how and what you teach on the subject?

Possible topics to explore:

Do you regard 3D printing technology/processes as equivalent to or fundamentally different from more familiar shop resources?
How do you address a potentially steep learning curve while avoiding easy introductory projects (keychains, etc.)?
What software/hardware do you use and why?
Where do you fall along the professional equipment/DIY tool spectrum?
Have you had the technology long enough for students to get four years of access? What effect did this have on their work?

To apply, please fill out this form, then email the following to tburto1@artic.edu and taylor@taylorhokanson.com by Friday, July 15:

CV
paper title
paper abstract (200 words max)
name, contact information & cv of any co-presenter (if applicable)

ART NEWS FROM SIGGRAPH 2016

HIGHLY INTERACTIVE ART GALLERY PRESENTATION - 'DATA MATERIALITIES'

TO BE SPECIAL FEATURE AT SIGGRAPH 2016 IN ANAHEIM

CHICAGO, June 16, 2016—Highly interactive art exhibits from around the world will be a special feature during SIGGRAPH 2016, the world's leading annual interdisciplinary educational experience showcasing the latest in computer graphics and interactive techniques. With the tagline "Render the Possibilities," SIGGRAPH 2016 will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center, 24–28 July 2016.

This year's Art Gallery, assembled under the banner "Data Materialities," represents a unique collection of 10 highly interactive installations created from 2003–2016.

SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery Chair Jonah Brucker-Cohen said, "We have made a special effort to bring back large-scale, highly immersive displays for the Art Gallery. Our title, 'Data Materialities,' illustrates the fact that in 2016, we are all constantly surrounded by networks, information, and data. Whether these stimuli consist of electromagnetic frequencies or physical wired connections, networks are everywhere, consuming and permeating our offices, homes, schools, and public indoor and outdoor spaces. 'Data Materialities' exposes this plethora of data and transforms it to incarnations of tangibility that not only showcase their complexity, but also allow us to relate to them on a human scale. By injecting humor and kinetic energy to this year's exposition, the Art Gallery will make light of these data platforms and present them on a grand scale to reveal their ubiquity."

Artwork and artists for the SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery Chair are selected by the program chair and not by a jury. This year's Art Gallery will be open to attendees during the following dates and times:

Sun, 24 July | Noon – 5:30 pm
Mon, 25 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Tue, 26 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Wed, 27 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Thu, 28 July | 10 am – 1 pm

"Data Materialities" Art Gallery highlights include:

Submergence | Chris Bennewith, Liam Birtles, Oliver Brown, Gaz Bushell, and Anthony Rowe, Squidsoup
"Submergence" is a large, immersive, walkthrough experience that uses up to 8,064 individual points of suspended light to create feelings of presence and movement within physical space. This video from YouTube user Nick Hunter shows the installation at the Geneva Mapping Festival.

Pixelbots | Paul Beardsley, Disney Research Zürich
Disney Research Zürich created a new kind of display in which pixels, called "Pixelbots," are represented as small colorful mobile robots which create cartoon-like images or animations. Pixelbots can be seen on the Disney Research YouTube channel, where they present a "Story of the Universe" animation, including a fish, a dinosaur, and a human.

The Kinetic Story Teller | Tine Bech, Independent Artist
"The Kinetic Story Teller" installation investigates how art, technology, and playfulness can create new systems of communication by materializing data through kinetic interaction - and offer people new ways of connecting with each other in public spaces. Two beautiful swings light up and display people's social media messages on screens, encouraging participants to connect while they play.

Plinko Poetry | Peiqui Su and Deqing Sun, New York University
A playful, interactive installation, "Plinko Poetry" has its roots in both the famous TV game show "The Price Is Right" and experimental blackout poetry. Every player can be both a winner and a poet. Drawing source text from current @nytimes and @FoxNews tweets, players can absurdly re-contextualize news headlines that are often overloaded with meaning.

For more information on the SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery, please see: s2016.siggraph.org/content/art-gallery.

To register for SIGGRAPH 2016, visit s2016.siggraph.org/registration.

To follow conference news on social media, check us out on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube, Instagram, or the ACM SIGGRAPH blog.

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About SIGGRAPH 2016
The annual SIGGRAPH conference is a five-day interdisciplinary educational experience in the latest computer graphics and interactive techniques, including a three-day commercial exhibition that attracts hundreds of companies from around the world. The conference also hosts the international SIGGRAPH Computer Animation Festival, showcasing works from the world's most innovative and accomplished digital film and video creators. Juried and curated content includes outstanding achievements in time-based art, scientific visualization, visual effects, games, real-time graphics, virtual reality, and narrative shorts. SIGGRAPH 2016 will take place from 24-28 July 2016 in Anaheim, California. Visit the SIGGRAPH 2016 website or follow SIGGRAPH on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or Instagram for more detailed information.

About ACM
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, is the world's largest educational and scientific computing society, uniting educators, researchers, and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources, and address the field's challenges. ACM strengthens the computing profession's collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for lifelong learning, career development, and professional networking.

Media Contact:
Dan Harary
Public Relations Director
+1.310.859.1831
danharary@siggraph.org

CineSpace 2016 – Short Film Competition from NASA & HCAS

CineSpace 2016[2]

For the second year in a row, NASA and Houston Cinema Arts Society are inviting filmmakers around the world to participate in CineSpace, a short film competition that is inspired by, and utilizes actual NASA video footage. 

Eligible submissions include short video, film, and digital-media works of 10 minutes or less. CineSpace is seeking films from all genres and styles including but not limited to: experimental, narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, ambient, music videos, re-mix, sports, horror, and underground. 

Prize Details: The total prize purse for this competition is USD 26,000. In addition to monetary prizes, winners shall receive tremendous exposure for their work. 

Application Instructions: Last date for submission is July 31, 2016. No entry fee is required.

Guidelines/ Registration Link: You may visit the CineSpace 2016 challenge page to register and to check out last year’s winners and finalists.

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – Public Journal of Imaging America

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Special Issue: Digital Engagements – When the Virtual Gets Real

Now accepting one-page proposals at iapublic@syr.edu.
Full submissions accepted August 1, 2016 – February 1, 2017 via the OJS submission portal.

For this special issue of PUBLIC, we invite artists, activists, designers, and scholars to explore the potential of digital technologies and practices to inspire creative, interactive, collaborative work for public engagement and the pursuit of social justice. The issue asks how engagement–the affective and embodied knowledges people gain in their everyday lives–can animate our virtual lives.

Technologically enhanced projects–digital archives and scholarship, social practice art, site specific installations, performance-based technologies, mobile applications, social media, and emerging experimental forms–are often touted as the new public commons. But how are artists, designers, and scholars committed to civic engagement creating virtual spaces that are interactive, a necessary condition for publicly engaged arts and scholarship?

We know the bad news. Virtual spaces have been hit by cyber-bullies–“Gamergate” is just one example. Digital access can be blocked by commercial gate-keeping. Gender, class, age, and other differences impact access to technology. What are the alternatives? Social media connects artists, academics, activists, and a broad public across the globe. Visualizations cut across language communities. This special issue of PUBLIC seeks to document, question, reflect upon, and advance projects in the digital arts and humanities that are designed not simply to be “in public” but also to engage diverse audiences and inspire collective action.

Possible Topics

We invite contributors to discuss the impact of projects that embody “digital engagements,” moving beyond description to the value, limitations, and potential impact of projects and practices. To suggest a few of the innumerable questions the issue might address– How can technologies activate diverse audiences, muster and support communities, and promote democratic practices? What new forms of collaboration are emerging in digital work? When does technology inhibit, change, or inspire cross sector partnerships–including campus/community partnerships–and how are artists, designers, and scholars tackling those obstacles? How are people from rural areas, inner cities, and developing regions participating in digital arts and humanities projects? How are artists, activists, scholars, designers, and developers overcoming social, economic, and technical obstacles? We also welcome projects focused on innovative research methods, syllabi, assignments, et cetera, at any level and proposals for reviews of studies, sites, art works or installations, conferences, blogs, etc. More generally, how do the resources and limits of virtuality change the assumptions and practices of artists, designers, and humanists?

Format

Submissions can take diverse forms as long as they are linked to the theme of the issue. For example, discussions of principles and practices might be critical pieces in multiple media, single or collaboratively authored, narrative or interview format. Reflective case studies might link to online projects that ask what “engagement” means practically and philosophically in existing projects. Feel free to propose experimental or collaborative formats that capture your work most vividly. We can accept a wide variety of formats for consideration; if you have any questions, please contact the guest and design editors.

Submission Process

We are currently accepting one-page description of the topic and format you are considering. Please email proposals to iapublic@syr.edu  Full submissions are due February 1, 2017 for peer review through our online submission portal at ojs.syr.edu. The guest editor and design editors will work with authors of accepted submissions through a process of revision and digital design in preparation for publication.

Contact guest editor Teresa Mangum (teresa-mangum@uiowa.edu) if you have questions or submit proposals directly to iapublic@syr.edu.

Call: Cinema Reset: New Media Exhibition at the New Orleans Film Festival

NOFF is looking to bring new media installations and experimental media artworks to the 2016 New Orleans Film Festival with an emphasis on virtual reality, video art, 360 video, game art, light / projection mapping, interactivity, and outdoor media installations. For consideration, please provide: a written proposal describing your project (no more than 500 words); a list of equipment you are able to provide and any/all specific equipment or technical needs; ideal space requirements, including prospective lighting needs; and please also submit any video, photos, stills, or sketches of your proposed project. This work must not have been exhibited in New Orleans previously.

Cinema Reset is the experimental media / new media partner of the New Orleans Film Festival. Since 2012, Cinema Reset has worked to bring emerging media artworks to New Orleans, facilitate open community media art workshops, and champion creative voices working on the front lines of emerging art and storytelling forms.

Call for Applications to The Art & Law Program

Applications are now open for the Fall 2016 session of the Art & Law Program in New York City.

Information about the Art & Law Program is available here: http://www.artlawprogram.com/new-page/

Applications are accepted online here: http://www.artlawprogram.com/new-page-1/

Fellows of The Program meet once a week for a 3-hour seminar to discuss readings and visual materials with the Director of the Program, Sergio Muñoz Sarmiento, curator/art historian and Associate Director of the Program, Lauren van Haaften-Schick, and/or with a guest seminar leader. There is an emphasis on the close analysis of legal cases, texts and materials. Through this examination of legal structures and modes of thought, the Program aims to critique current artistic, curatorial, theoretical, art historical, and design practices and methodologies. At the conclusion of the seminars, Fall term Fellows are expected to participate in a pecha-kucha presentation.

Applicants with backgrounds in art, art history/criticism, curating, architecture, film, writing, philosophy, business, economics, sociology, urban planning, political science and history are strongly encouraged to apply.

The Fall 2016 term runs from September 12 to December 12, 2016. Seminars will be held at the School of Visual Arts, in New York City, on Monday nights from 6pm to 9pm.

Applications for the Fall 2016 term are due on July 4, 2016. Application inquiries should be sent via e-mail to Sergio Muñoz Sarmiento: sms@artlawoffice.com


The Art & Law Program is a seminar series & residency program with a theoretical and philosophical focus on the effects of law and jurisprudence on cultural production and reception.

Technical Artistry

Experimental animation is an atypical open-ended expression. The theory of experimental is inviting, indicating non-conformity, yet the substantive approach and production are uncertain when rules do not apply. The treatment of experimental animation is continuously new and certainly lacks a recipe. The development taps into a unique approach for creating animation and constructs more occasions of interdisciplinary collaboration. Emerging fine art produced with conventional mediums carried into 3D software can generate unseen and intriguing techniques yielding compelling inspiration.

Example images below are frames from the process of my animated short, Apology to a Television Set. The practice began with a sketch that was imported into Autodesk Maya (3D software) and attached to the front camera. The front camera is an orthographic camera, a two-dimensional view displaying the X and Y-axes. 1

My method starts by recreating the original drawing with curves and then modeling polygonal tubes, which follow the curves shape. I select an edge from each polygonal tube and convert it to a NURBS curve. The resulting curve has added depth compared to the original curve and also carries a circular shape at both ends. The winding shape enhances the sketch style by spreading the later applied strokes on each end of the curve. The below image demonstrates the effect of a stroke applied to a curve with circular ends.2 Within Maya is a set of paintEfx “brushes”; every iteration is referred to as a “stroke.” Strokes are either two-dimensional textures or three-dimensional geometry. For my method, I am using strokes as a 3D unit within the entirety of paintEfx.

This sketch style has applied dynamics such as wind, gravity and other force fields. The second layer of animation is implemented on the extensive array of attributes within the brush strokes. Directing brush strokes to travel and grow in a definite direction or wrap around an object involves finessing the simulation. One process I implement in my work is modeling polygonal surfaces for stroke collision. The manipulation of simulation requires keyframing polygonal surfaces to control the movement of the brush strokes. The two images below demonstrate brush strokes pushed by gravitational force as well as attraction and collision. Below, the images side by side show letters which are formed by brush strokes. These strokes are attracted to transparent polygon models which are modeled as the letters. A transparent material is applied to the polygon models and are unseen in the final render. Workarounds and practices such as these shed light on new notions to promote a further exploration of the 3D software as a tool to create work that appears as an animated charcoal drawing.

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The below image is a simplified description of brush strokes attracted to and colliding with a polygonal sphere.

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Creating the particular look I want to achieve is a process of trial and error involving strokes and curves. The image below shows curves, blue, and strokes, black, white and gray. I apply several strokes to one curve for animating blending strokes.
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Curves allow for several forms of animation and can be quite intuitive. Editing control points, which make up the curve, can generate a predictable animation, which aids in manipulating simulation. I assign strokes to curves and animate both the curves and paintEfx strokes. The stroke follows and attaches itself to a curve, however, it is possible to animate the influence a curve has on the stroke resulting in interesting effects. The image below demonstrates curves deformed by a non-linear bend deformer. The left side of the image is what it looks like in Maya and the right side is the rendered image.

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The second experimental animation I applied my method titled Barker is using the same concept to animate what looks like a charcoal drawing. Below are example frames from the animation showing the lead in brush strokes scattered and then forming into a figure.

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My third animation which I am currently working on titled The Art of Restraint and Cool Excuses will implement the above method.

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Lauren Carr: Previously a Character TD in feature animation for 15 years, now is a 3D Animation  Assistant Professor at Montclair State University.

CALL FOR PAPERS/PRESENTATIONS – NMC at CAA

College Art Association in NYC
Feb 15-18, 2017
Deadline: June 10, 2016

New Media Caucus at CAA
Other Media: Decolonizing practices and cyborg ontologies

CALL FOR PAPERS/PRESENTATIONS

“Rather than going for the new object of study, the new product to consume, one should work on new ways of seeing, of being, or of living in the world.” – Trihn T. Minh-Ha from D-Passage: The Digital Way

“Cyborg writing is about the power to survive, not on the basis of original innocence, but on the basis of seizing the tools to mark the world that marked them as other.” – Donna Haraway from A Cyborg Manifesto

Following Donna Haraway’s epochal work A Cyborg Manifesto in which she imagines the cyborg condition as a site of liberation and decolonized subjectivity, this panel considers diverse approaches of artists, historians, theoretician-practitioners, and media activists that encode strategies of decolonization in their work and practice. Through a critical engagement of code as a (rhetorical) tool to re-inscribe historically marginalized bodies, this panel looks at a broad array of efforts, tactics, and projects that consider the ethos of a cyborg condition imagined by Haraway’s writing. As part of this conversation, we may begin to ask: through what means and technologies are these situations deployed? What are the strategies that allow for decolonized processes that are situated within feminist, queer, and anti-colonial subjectivities? And how do these methods enable, embody, and construct new realities of being?

Recognizing new media’s ability to rupture obsolete systems in the efforts to reconstruct other idealized ontologies, this panel extends the cyborg condition through theoretical approaches and practice in an effort to re-imagine human relation. In particular, this panel seeks to address how new media practice and theory can reconfigure our understandings of marginality as well as offer strategies that enable the repositioning of subjects so as to decolonize their subjectivity.

Artists, historians, theoretician-practitioners, and media activists are all invited to submit their work for consideration for this New Media Caucus panel at the College Art Association in New York February 2017. Interested applicants should submit an abstract, 3-4 samples of their work as a link (if necessary), a CV, and their contact information. Accepted panel participants will need to either register for the CAA conference or buy a one-day pass. Submissions are due June 3, 2017 to Alejandro T. Acierto at acierto [at] uic [dot] edu. Notifications will be sent out around July 1.

The #Additivism #Deluge: A Final Call to Arms

To celebrate one year of #Additivism we have reopened our call to arms for ONE FINAL WEEK. A final chance for theorists, designers, artists, activists and Additivists to submit radical, provocative, and weird projects to The 3D Additivist Cookbook.

For the #Deluge we are interested in simple projects and ideas. Provocations that take advantage of the democratic simplicity of plastic and desktop 3D printers for the purpose of activism, speculation, and disarray,

Therefore, this call to arms has a short deadline too…

The #Additivism #Deluge deadline is Tuesday 1st of June

NOW GO... AND STOP PROGRESS!!!

 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History Contemporary and New Media Art at Alfred University

The School of Art and Design, New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University is seeking a Visiting Assistant Professor in art history to teach the history of contemporary and new media art for the academic year 2016-17. Special attention will be given to candidates who can teach contemporary art from an international perspective. Teaching responsibilities include the equivalent of a 3/3 load: a freshman-level, half-semester course (to be repeated in fall and spring); a required sophomore-level course, Issues and Debates in Contemporary Art; an upper-level course in contemporary art; and a seminar in new media art for senior and graduate students. With the exception of the sophomore requirement, courses in art history are open to all undergraduate students at Alfred University and primarily serve students majoring in studio art (BFA), art history and theory (BS), interdisciplinary art (BA) programs.

The art history curriculum is an integral part of the program at the School of Art and Design. The Division of Art History is one of six divisions in a comprehensive art school with a very active faculty and prolific student body who access renowned facilities for artistic and scholarly research.

Qualifications

Required: PhD or ABD in Art History or related field. Teaching experience is preferred. Appointment begins in August 2016.

Alfred University

The School of Art and Design at Alfred University is an accredited member of NASAD, with 34 full-time faculty serving approximately 500 students. The School is unique among institutions of higher education with an open curriculum, allowing a robust and diverse experience in art history and studio art. Students and faculty alike thrive in an intensive and supportive learning environment. School of Art and Design students are fully integrated into Alfred University’s community of 2,300 students. The New York State College of Ceramics (NYSCC) includes the School of Art and Design, the Inamori School of Engineering, and Scholes Library. The NYSCC was established in 1900 to advance research in art, design, and engineering. That intellectual and creative legacy exists in all of the areas of study in the School of Art and Design.

Alfred University is an equal opportunity employer (EOE) and actively seeks diversity among its employees. Salary is commensurate with experience.

Application Process

Please e-mail, as a single pdf document, a letter of application, current CV, teaching philosophy, and the names and contact information of three references to: humanresources@alfred.edu or mail to: Alfred University Human Resource Office, Greene Hall, One Saxon Drive, Alfred NY 14802.

Review of applications will begin immediately; the position is open until filled.

For more information, contact Mary McInnes at mcinnes@alfred.edu

IEEE VIS 2016 Arts Program – Call for Entries, Paper and Exhibition Tracks

The IEEE VIS 2016 Arts Program, or VISAP’16, showcases innovative artwork and research that explores the exciting and increasingly prominent intersections between art, design, and visualization. Through a dedicated papers track and an exhibition that runs concurrently with the IEEE VIS 2016 conference, the Arts Program aims to foster new thinking, discussion, and collaboration between artists, designers, technologists, visualization scientists, and others working at the intersection of these fields. The theme for the Call for Papers and Artworks this year is “Metamorphoses.” We are especially interested in projects and papers that explore the relationships between visualization research and arts and/or design practice, and that introduce creative visual techniques that emphasize transformative aspects of scientific or cultural exploration.

VISAP’16 runs for one week from October 23rd through October 28th during the IEEE VIS 2016 conference in Baltimore, Maryland. Both the artworks and the papers are selected through a rigorous peer review process. Submissions are evaluated on quality and relevance to the IEEE VIS community by a program committee made up of experts in visualization, media arts, and design. In 2015, the acceptance rate for artworks was 14.75% and the acceptance rate for papers was 25%; we expect it to be similarly competitive for the 2016 program.

Submissions to VISAP’16 are due on June 24th at 5pm PDT.

For more information, please visit the VISAP’16 website: http://visap.uic.edu/2016

Leonardo ABstract Services Opportunity

What is LABS? - http://collections.pomona.edu/labs/

LABS is a comprehensive database of abstracts of Phd, Masters and MFA theses in the emerging intersection between art, science and technology. Persons who have received advanced degrees in arts (visual, sound, performing, text), computer sciences, the sciences and/or technology which in some way investigate philosophical, historical, critical or applications of science or technology to the arts are invited to submit an abstract of their thesis for publication consideration in this database.

Deadline : June 30

What is Leonardo/ISAST? - leonardo.info
Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST) is a nonprofit organization that serves the global network of distinguished scholars, artists, scientists, researchers and thinkers through our programs focused on interdisciplinary work, creative output and innovation. From its beginnings, Leonardo/ISAST has served as THE virtual community for purposes of networking, resource-sharing, best practices, research and events in Art/Science/Technology.

Sign Up to Receive Opportunities for Leonardo

Survey on Data Usage in Art History

NMC members,

Please consider taking a short survey that seeks to gauge information about the usage and users of open data and datasets from museums and other cultural heritage institutions. If you’ve worked with museum APIs, SPARQL endpoints, or Github datasets (or other art historical data), this survey is for you! The primary survey groups are those working and researching in art history. However, researchers in all disciplines are encouraged to respond. Please distribute this survey to other interested parties!

The survey is here: http://goo.gl/forms/a1TOlGUEPE

Thanks for your consideration, and if you have any questions, please contact me.

Sarah E. Seymore
Digital Metadata Technician
Digital Scholarship Center
University of Oregon Libraries
sseymore@uoregon.edu

The Digital Scholarship Center (DSC) collaborates with faculty members and students to transform research and scholarly communication using new media and digital technologies. Based on a foundation of access, sharing, and preservation, the DSC provides digital asset management, digital preservation, training, consultations, and tools for digital scholarship.

Call for applications, symposium: Art History in Digital Dimensions

Deadline: May 30, 2016

Supported by the Getty Foundation and the Kress Foundation, the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities of the University of Maryland will host a symposium, "Art History in Digital Dimensions," on October 19-21, 2016. We aim to unite diverse audiences and practitioners in a critical intervention for digital art history, providing a road map for the future. We seek applications for 15 participants, including 5 graduate students, to join 25 invited contributors. Participants will have experience from the academy and/or museum in art-historical research practices that intersect with the digital realm. Full CFP and guidelines at www.dah-dimensions.org.

The symposium, Art History in Digital Dimensions, is a joint enterprise of the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park.

A Normal Future – Interview with NORMALS

Normals is a collective whose work crosses a number of boundaries. Perhaps their work is a proposal that the boundaries we once found useful in defining creative practice don’t work as well in our connected/networked/hybrid cultures. What do the spaces between design, digital studio practice, networked art, and Internet Art look like? What do the spaces between fiction, abstraction, and social media performance look like? What do the spaces between the real, the virtual, and the augmented look like? It isn’t easy to define through traditional categories what artists create in our contemporary visual culture more broadly and definitely challenging with the work of Normals in particular.
I met Normals in 2012 at the 2nd International Computer Art Congress in Paris, where their physical bodies live and work. Since that time they have continued to produce multifaceted speculative works of multiple disciplinary categories. In the past several months, they have been promoting a new work - APPAREL. Our interview focuses on that work but is ongoing.
# Hi Normals - for our readers not familiar with your work, tell us about APPAREL. The work has a number of parts - how do they fit together?
APPAREL is a piece of clothing designed to co-exist in the digital and physical spaces. It comes as a polygonal black cape, and an iOS application allowing the wearer to see the piece’s digital counterpart, in augmented reality. The cape itself is as minimalistic as its digital overlay is complex and refined. The digital model is generated through a text analysis of the wearer's Twitter feed, evolving in real time, and creates a unique piece of clothing, as an info-graphic, an incarnation of the wearer's online personality.
Being a speculative studio working on anticipation, we like to imagine what a world where our “products” are widespread would look like, and for that specific reason we tend to pair our projects with loads of fiction, describing hypothetical users, and their relationship to theses objects in a future where they have become… well… normal. So, for APPAREL, not only did we make a functional product (with the coding help of Julien “V3ga” Gachadoat), but we also imagined a future fashion show, a fashion contest, in which everybody wears an Apparel and competes over their digital personalities.
This has been the subject to a short story, a video depicting one of the contestants (3PLUS3MAKE5), a soundtrack generated from the contestants’ profiles, and a faux-documentary depicting fashion’s transfer over to the digital realm.
The work is speculative, but it is also about things that are currently happening and developing in Arts/Tech environments.  What do you think are some of the more interesting directions in creative culture today?
Everything speculative is about something currently happening! Honestly, there are many interesting aspects to the evolution of arts, tech, and fashion, but we decided to focus on one question that has driven the entire project: “what would our clothes look like if they became digital?” Considering AR as a potential technology to display a data-based esthetic layer over physical things, it seemed obvious that all things esthetic would transit to this reactive and polymorphous layer of contextual information. On the other hand, the physical piece of clothing had to be reduced to a simple protective piece of fabric, a pedestal for its glorious digital overlay.
But to answer your question, we feel anything can be interesting as long as it doesn’t fall into the trap of “fascination.” The role of artists, designers, or “futurists” is to look at what tomorrow might bring without being so fascinated by their subject that they transform critical thinking into wishful thinking without even knowing it. “What will [insert something] look like in the future?” is always a valid question, as long as the answer isn’t “flying cars” or “eternal life.” No one should look at innovation as something purely good or purely bad: whatever’s interesting lies in the middle.
APPAREL had/has a number of contestants - Users creating and sharing their fashion/design - what are some of your favorites?
We love them all! When imagining a product or an object, it’s always extremely fun to imagine the people interacting with it, whether it is as “hackers” of the system, or people full of admiration for the “progress” it stands for, it is one of the main focuses of our practice: imaginary users for speculative objects.
All the characters described in the story are representative of  an “attitude” towards digital fashion: the main character, Abdlcroco, is a competitor who only runs after achievements, while Mangel is seeking for the perfect performance, and 3PLUS3MAKE5 cultivates eye-candies to satisfy her audience’s craving for fun and cute things. Duall is probably the most intriguing character though, being someone who doesn’t care about this fashion contest, but comes to watch it every day, and is, despite his efforts to make people believe he doesn’t care, part of this system too.
A question for one of the contestants - is AbdlCroco available? 
He is.
Screen Shot 2016-04-18 at 10.11.32 AM
AbdlCroco - you used to be one of the top ranked contestants - tell our readers about one of your most highly rated designs - what was it like? What did the crowd think?
What I do is very personal. Whatever I feel like on the moment, I just turn it into a situational dance that spits epileptic graphics right into the viewer’s ‘i’. But if I have to chose one… I’d say back when I was Number Six or something. There was this one time… See, I made these bunky prisms that would go boom-boom-boom in your face as the bass in the soundtrack — the most epic collection of the deepest, darkest, fattest bass samples you could find on the Stream — also went boom-boom-boom. Even the floor looked like it was shaking, with all the lines blinking up and down looted from SK000N’s template — you know the one I’m talking about, right? So I had all this set up, and as I stepped on stage, there was some kind of power shutdown or something, and all the lights went out, and it was so in sync with my show that every frenz thought it was all planned. But truly it wasn’t. Just got lucky. And frenz digged my stuff so hard they remained silent throughout the whole thing, and I even got a standing ovation — well, the “standing” part doesn’t count though, everyone was standing already. But still got an ovation. That one was the best. Got straight to number 4 after that. But that was another time…
AbdlCroco - what do you think of Mangel’s fashion? His work seems to be on top lately - what does the crowd like about Mangel?
Allow me to speak frankly: Mangel’s a joke! Every single day Trudent welcomes a fashion show, with rules, RULES — you are judged on your LOOKS. The performance has now become a part of the show, and I’m okay with that: you should be able to display your outfit in the best manner possible. But what I HATE is frenz who use the performance to go hypno on the audience, to a point where they’re not even looking at the ONLY thing they should be looking at. Mangel’s just a comedian, he acts, makes people laugh, but no one sees that he just copies everyone else, and never comes up with ANYTHING NEW. Yet people like him, so they vote for him, and he remains there, everyday, trolling his way to the top.
 Normals - Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts with us, we look forward to seeing what happens next!

Call – Fullbright Scholars Program 2017-2018

The Fulbright Scholar Program offers teaching, research or combination teaching and research awards in over 125 countries for the 2017-2018 academic year. Opportunities are available for college and university faculty and administrators as well as for professionals, artists, journalists, independent scholars and many others.  

Opportunities that may be of particular interest include:

  • Norway: Digital Culture – A teaching and research award which allows the selected candidate to take part in the activities of the Digital Culture program and the Digital Culture and Electronic Literature research groups in the Department of Linguistic, Literary and Aesthetic Studies at the University of Bergen. The scholar will teach three courses in digital culture and digital media aesthetics and evaluate student work.
  • Latvia: Multiple Disciplines – Liepaja University has requested a specialist in new media arts. The selected scholar will teach undergraduate and graduate courses in one or more of their area of specialization. Interested applicants should contact the host institution for further information and to discuss their background and teaching.
  • Bulgaria: Communications, Journalism, Media – The selected scholar will teach undergraduate or graduate courses or both, consult on curriculum development and assist with student advising. Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines with preference for scholars in digital technologies in the media and electronic media.

For further awards in the field, please visit our updated Communications, American Studies and Fine Arts discipline pages. There you will find award highlights and examples of successful projects in the discipline, and scholar testimonials which highlight the outcomes and benefits associated with completing a Fulbright Scholar grant.

For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow this link: http://cies.org/program/core-fulbright-us-scholar-program. You may also wish to register for one of our webinars or join our online community, My Fulbright, a resource center for applicants interested in the program.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and the current competition will close on August 1, 2016.

Please contact Bill McShane at wmcshane@iie.org for additional information.

The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is the U.S. government’s flagship international exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world.

Call For Artists: Black Box Arts & Technology Festival, Seattle

*Open Call for Artists: Black Box 3.0*

Eligibility: International
Location: Seattle, Online
Application Deadline: May 31, 2016 at 5PM PST

Festival Dates: September 21 - October 2, 2016
Hashtag: #BlackBoxing
Shareable URL: bit.ly/blackboxing

Artists from around the world working in any medium are invited to submit work to Black Box 3.0. A multi-platform program of significant scope, Black Box is an annual international arts and technology festival produced by Aktionsart in Seattle. The festival explores how technology is transforming the arts, culture, and public life.

Black Box is a platform for the most talented and innovative artists, filmmakers, designers, curators, technologists, hackers, and makers in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. The festival features new work by international contemporary artists who are collected by major museums and routinely featured on the international art circuit. It is also an essential voice for emerging talent. Black Box is open to all arts disciplines and mediums, including visual art, performance, design, fashion, music, folk and traditional arts, literature, media, film, research, theater, and more.

Core programming is nomadic and experiential, presenting projects in unexpected spaces throughout the city. The tightly curated festival includes exhibitions, screenings, discussions, workshops, installations, performances, and hybrid formats. An online channel - which received over 25,000 visits in 2015 - premieres and distributes festival content to audiences in Seattle and beyond.

Black Box collaborates closely with a selective partner network of Seattle’s most adventurous institutions. Past partners include Seattle Art Museum, Seattle International Film Festival, University of Washington, Seattle Center, and Cornish College of the Arts. In 2015, Black Box exhibited over eighty artists including new work from Pierre Huyghe, Ed Atkins, Sue de Beer, Phil Collins, Josh Kline, Gillian Wearing, Roman Signer, Zach Blas, Petra Cortright, Lisa Tan, Stan Douglas, Knut Asdam, Kalup Linzy, Robin Rhode, Ellie Ga, and Julien Prévieux.

There is no overarching festival theme beyond the umbrella of “arts and technology”, which is intentionally open. Attention will be closely paid to intellectually rigorous and socially urgent ideas, emerging technologies, and experimental projects that present new modes of creating and thinking. We are interested in works that respond to the following themes, tools or mediums: augmented and virtual reality, gaming, expanded and immersive cinema, social media, architectural mapping, generative software, systems, mobility and mobile apps, wearables, digital labor, interactivity, data visualization, experimental and interactive documentary, surveillance, biotech, holography, space exploration, 3D printing, robotics, production and distribution tools/platforms, artificial intelligence, machine learning, hypercompliance, deep web, blockchain, digital culture, sustainability, innovation, disnovation, transmedia, utopia.

Technology disrupts the arts, but how do the arts disrupt technology? What is the role of artist and creator in an increasingly mechanized world? How can artists leverage new tools to produce, distribute, create access, and build audiences for their work? How does technological innovation and disnovation shape public life?

APPLY: www.aktionsart.org/submissions


Aktionsart is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit laboratory based in Seattle that cultivates entrepreneurial actions in the arts and technology. Our mission is to engage technology, design and contemporary culture to produce ambitious art projects in public and private space. We support artists who use technology for positive cultural impact and social innovation.

www.aktionsart.org
www.twitter.com/aktionsart

 

Call For Papers SECAC: Vision Machines and Pre-Cinematic Optical Devices: Panoramas, Stereoscopes and Places of Otherness

Vision Machines and Pre-Cinematic Optical Devices: Panoramas, Stereoscopes and Places of Otherness Since the 18th century, optical devices and immersive technologies have been used in the form of panoramas and later the stereoscope, in order to transport the viewer into foreign lands or historical times, often seen as places of otherness. Viewers experienced a form of virtual travel, through the act of seeing panorama in a public place or a stereoscope in their living room. Some argue that these devices contributed to a new kind of observer in the 1840s (Crary), or that they are responsible for the rupture of established ideas of separated subject and object relations, as pre-cinematic devices. Today cardboard stereoscopes from google enable us to map things in virtual space, or walk the streets of Mumbai using our phones as VR viewers. What role did these devices play in society, art and culture in the past and how may they impinge today on perceptions of place making, mapping, the body, or underrepresented urban environments in their contemporary manifestations (as art practice or scholarship), for example? We are interested in proposals from artists, theorists and art historians, whose work engages these devices in their various forms. These can encompass the panorama, phenakistiscope, zoetrope, stereoscope or virtual reality.

Session Chairs: Simonetta Moro, Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts, and Rebecca Hackemann, University of the Arts London. Kansas State University.

Contact: smoro@idsva.org

More Info: https://secac.memberclicks.net/assets/documents/secac/conference/secac-2016-call-for-papers.pdf

The 2016 SECAC Conference will be held in Roanoke, VA, hosted by Virginia Tech and Hollins University (http://www.secacart.org/conference). Sessions will include panels by artists and art historians on a variety of topics.

Call for Papers SECAC: Ecology Communication in Art and Education

Today, we live in a time of increasing pressures on the environment from climate change and
other sources. As the current state of political discourse sometimes demonstrates, this makes it
critical to use various media to inform and engage the public on the challenges we face. In this
panel, the participants will discuss projects that explore how art communicates vital
information about ecology and science. From landscape painters to land artists, there is a long
tradition of art dealing with the environment and man's impact on it. This panel will explore
how new artistic practices and interdisciplinary efforts are meeting the greater challenges we
face today.

This session will focus on the critical role that art can play in communicating scientific and
ecological challenges. The panel will present examples demonstrating a broad spectrum of
ways to approach this challenge. These include the communication of science through visually
representative means, scientifically rigorous investigations whose outcomes are both artist and
scientific, and collaborations between artists and scientists. The panel addresses both artistic
works and educational efforts.

Deadline: April 20th

Session Chairs: Sara Gevurtz, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Thomas Asmuth, University of West Florida

Contact: skgevurtz@vcu.edu

The 2016 SECAC Conference will be held in Roanoke, VA, hosted by Virginia Tech and Hollins University (http://www.secacart.org/conference). Sessions will include panels by artists and art historians on a variety of topics.

Call for Applications – Summer 2016 Programs at School of Machines, Making, and Make-Believe

The School of Machines, Making, and Make-Believe is thrilled to announce our open call for applications! Our four-week intensive summer programs will focus on three main areas: computer vision, machine learning for artists, and virtual reality. http://schoolofma.org/programs/

Leading figures in the fields of new-media art and technology will unite in Berlin to lead the full-time programs, which have in the past drawn attendees from as far away as Brazil, Mexico, India, and the US, as well as from several countries throughout Europe.

Visit our website to learn more and submit an application: http://schoolofma.org.

In addition, we're excited to offer two scholarships per program to cover tuition cost for refugee applicants with some experience in the areas of art and technology. If you know persons who may be interested in applying, please forward this email!

TOPICS | PROGRAM DATES::
See Or Be Seen (topic: Computer Vision): 6 June - 1 July
The Neural Aesthetic (topic: AI & Machine Learning for Artists): 4 July - 29 July
Virtual Fictions: (topic: Storytelling & Virtual Reality): 1 August - 26 August

Second Early application deadline: 2 May
Regular application deadline: Program Begin

Twitter | https://twitter.com/schoolofmaaa
Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/schoolofmachines

School of Machines, Making & Make Believe is a uniquely curated School born in Berlin, Germany in 2014, keen on inventing one-of-a-kind hands-on learning experiences in the areas of art, technology, design, and human connection. We embrace art, creativity and exploring the latest technology and ourselves with humility and curiosity.

We teach tangible skills like how to code, work with electronics and use digital fabrication tools while exploring concepts, narrative and play. Our goal is to help people take the fantastical ideas inside their heads out into the physical realm to further their artistic practice or to help wrestle out the confidence to begin one. We teach technology to artists and design, creativity, and art to the technology community.

 

CFP, Conference Session: New Aesthetics and the Postdigital, Their Effect on Contemporary Art

CFP: New Aesthetics and the Postdigital, Their Effect on Contemporary Art. Since its introduction at SXSW in 2012, "New Aesthetics" has been increasingly recognized as an important perspective in the discussions of digital and postdigital art as well as a driving force in art practice. At a time when contemporary art production is commonly facilitated by digital technology, New Aesthetics is a frame of reference and an attitude revealing the pervasiveness of digital objects’ presence in our everyday lives as well as the deeply rooted and persistent, autonomous agency of computational algorithms in many forms of contemporary art. Regardless of the inadequacy of its coinage, proposals addressing the variety of issues suggested by New Aesthetics, New Aesthetic artistic practice and objects, and New Aesthetic’s relationship to the notion of postdigital are welcome.

Session Chair: Scott Contreras-Koterbay, East Tennessee State University (koterbay@etsu.edu or scottkoterbay@gmail.com)

The 2016 SECAC Conference will be held in Roanoke, VA, hosted by Virginia Tech and Hollins University (http://www.secacart.org/conference). Sessions are include presentations by studio artists, art historians and a mix of these and other professionals.

Upcoming Events: IMRC at University of Maine

Located on the University of Maine Campus the Innovative Media, Research and Commercialization Center (IMRC Center), at Stewart Commons, is a 15,000+ square foot facility provides comfortable, state of the art prototyping facilities, audio and video production spaces, a resource library, performance and installation spaces, classrooms, and offices. IMRC is outfitted with a variety of tools and equipment, including a full shop, 3D printers and 3D scanner, computer controlled machine tools, a cutting and engraving laser, plastic vacuum former, large format printers, a range of design and production software, electronics workbenches, video and still cameras, audio recording and mixing equipment, and a variety of tools for supporting interactive environments and installations.

Opened in 2013, the IMRC Center is a hub for learning, creating and producing. It is the most recent of the portfolio of the University of Maine’s facilities that support innovation and economic development. The IMRC Center is supported by a range of expert instructors and a community of collaborators. Visit http://www.imrccenter.com/, where you can find information on the facility, programs and events.

The IMRC has several upcoming events:

FREE movie night at IMRC Center: "Fantastic Planet" On Tuesday, April 5 at 7p.m. the IMRC will host a free and public screening of Fantastic Planet as a part of Tuesday’s at the IMRC, the UMaine Intermedia MFA program’s visiting artist lecture series. Fantastic Planet  is a 1973 cutout stop motion science fiction film by French writer and artist René Laloux. The animated epic that is by turns surreal and lovely, fantastic and graceful, can be seen as allegorical of the relationship between various groups of humans, as well as between humans and animals, drawing on the themes of racism and speciesism. Fantastic Planet is recognizable for its dreamy, psychedelic imagery, that is backed by a soundtrack composed by Alain Goraguer.

Experimental Avant-Garde Music Performance at UMaine: Experimental avant-garde musician id m theft able will perform for the UMaine community on Tuesday, April 12 at 7p.m. as a part of Tuesdays at the IMRC. This concert is free and open to the public. id m theft able performs within and without the realms of noise, avant improvisation, sound poetry, and performance using voice, found objects, electronics, and whatever else is available. He has given hundreds of performances across 4 continents in settings ranging from the humblest of squats to the fanciest of festivals. The hear samples of id m theft able’s work, visit https://idmtheftable.bandcamp.com

FREE Brown Bag Workshop Series: The IMRC invites you to participate in a free workshop series utilizing the unique array of technology that the IMRC has to offer to the residents of the state of Maine. The IMRC serves as a technology and start up incubator for our local communities by providing training and and opening up access to cutting edge technology. This workshop series is free and will run on Thursdays and Fridays at 12:00pm from April 7 - April 29th. Feel free to bring your lunch! Topics covered will include 3D scanning and printing, textile art, photo and video, social media, music and sound, video editing and much more. For a complete list of workshops and sign up information, please visit http://www.imrccenter.com/workshops.

 

Chronodrift

From handbound woodblock printed zines to rendered CAD drawings, Chronodrift will showcase over 150 examples of print media at The Lumber Room in Portland, Oregon, opening on April 1st. The exhibition will include work by Alfred University Expanded Media alumni, such as Ying Miao’s Self Cleaner, a union of a woman and an industrial vacuum superimposed on a high-res scan of dryer lint and Ark3: Fly Signals - Anatomical Quivering - Spirit Guides, an archival pigment print of a fly-man in a video studio by Darrin Martin and Torsten Zenas Burns. Faculty work will include Joseph Scheer’s investigation into moth species through high-resolution digital prints at a 60” scale and Kathryn Vajda’s Snow City at Dawn, inkjet prints of built landscapes presenting changing climate ecosystems through a science-fiction lens.

Ying Miao Self - Cleaner 32 x 44” Digital Print 2008

Ying Miao
Self - Cleaner
32 x 44”
Digital Print

Assistant, Associate or Professor of Graphic Design/Visual Communication in The College of Arts and Creative Enterprises-Zayed University-UAE

The Opportunity

The College of Arts and Creative Enterprises seeks a qualified candidate to fill a full-time faculty position in the area of Graphic and Interactive Design and to teach in the BFA programs in Graphic Design with a full-time faculty appointment in the Abu Dhabi or Dubai campus starting August 2016. Candidates with an interdisciplinary practice/approach are encouraged to apply.

The Requirements

Applicants must have earned a Doctorate or Master of Fine Arts degree (or equivalent), preferably in the field of Graphic Design or Visual Communications, and demonstrate a record of professional activity and accomplishments especially in screen-based distribution, and/or active research in the field of communication design. The successful applicant should have a minimum of two (2) years’ college-level teaching experience with some experience of curriculum development, and will be expected to teach both introductory (Foundation) and advanced level courses. Experience with graduate programs would be an asset.

Our particular aim with this appointment is to develop and strengthen the delivery of graphic/interactive design across the major. As a result we would particularly like to encourage established creative with experience in creating interactive media for professional clients with a thorough knowledge of graphic/interaction design; interactive media; and new technologies for various platforms, including desktop, web, social networking, and design for social change.

The successful candidate should demonstrate versatility, forward thinking, and advanced working knowledge of the leading technology software (Adobe Creative Suite/Cloud) appropriate to Graphic Design, Interactive Design and Multimedia Design. Additionally, the position requires an awareness of current issues in Design education, and a working knowledge and insight into the innovative application of media tools. The candidate’s approach and experience in engaging students in new media tools and digital skills should be evident within their teaching portfolio – statement of teaching philosophy, syllabi and samples of student work. Proficiency with typography and Arabic typographic is considered an asset Candidates must understand and support the integrated nature of the curriculum and must be able to contribute to art and design excellence, both academic and professional, within the college. Applicants should also be willing to collaborate with other colleges within the University and demonstrate a commitment to education and to scholarly and professional work.

Successful candidates will also demonstrate:

  • A proven record of excellence at baccalaureate-level teaching.
  • Dedication to curricular innovation.
  • Commitment to a sustained pace of scholarship and/or creative activities.
  • A record of professional accomplishment appropriate to their rank.
  • Substantial level of computer literacy and a good proficiency of usage of IT in education.
  • Willingness to provide service to the University, the College and the community.

The Benefits

The University’s benefits package is highly attractive, with competitive salaries free of tax in the U.A.E., housing, a furniture allowance, annual vacation airline tickets for the employee and immediate family, educational subsidies for children and healthcare is provided to the employee and sponsored family members.

To Apply

Please visit our web site www.zu.ac.ae click on ‘Employment’ to be directed to the recruitment website. In addition to completing the online application form, please include the following:

  • Cover letter
  • Current Curricular Vitae
  • Statement of undergraduate teaching philosophy
  • Statement of scholarly and creative interests
  • Sample syllabi
  • The names and contact details of three professional references
  • Portfolio (10-15 samples) of professional/research work and (10-15 samples) of student work should be provided on a CD/DVD, a PDF, or provide a dedicated and reliable website to view the work. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the positions are filled.

The University

Zayed University, a premier university in the United Arab Emirates, is an innovative institution based on an international model of higher education. With approximately 550 full-time faculty serving approximately 9500 undergraduate and 1000 graduate students on its campuses in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, the University prepares graduates to become leaders in government, business, civil society, and family life. The University expects its graduates to be competent in English and Arabic, proficient in the use of computing technology, and strong in quantitative and research skills. English is the primary language of instruction and administration.

Zayed University is fully accredited in the UAE and by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education in the US.

The United Arab Emirates is a progressive country known for its high standard of living and it’s safe and family-friendly environment.

KairUs at CAA, D.C. and Megacorp. in NYC

The opportunity to present our work at the New Media Caucus panel Ecologies of Creative Activism at the CAA conference gave us the occasion for a trip overseas to visit Washington D.C and New York. We worked out our jet-lag before the conference by visiting most of the Smithsonian museums. Museums are often a great source for inspiration specially when they connect with a current research topic. This was the case with the National Museum of Natural History where we spent several hours during two days in the Gems and Minerals gallery following our research at the Department of Mineral Sciences. Due to the ‘Behind the Smart World’ research lab that we have been curating the last year, we have gained an interest in understanding how rare earth minerals are used in electronics. In the gallery, it was interesting to see how not only rare earth elements but also other elements extracted from minerals are really the building blocks for magnets, displays, and electronics in all of our information technology gadgets. Our ability to communicate and create as much of our other needs in life really depends upon mining. These extremely beautiful crystal-formed chemical elements are refined for use in everything from our kitchenwear to pesticides and of course in our computers, phones, TV-screens, etc. What is problematic with mining is that it has severe ecological impact and refining minerals is a very toxic business. At the New Media Caucus panel we met Andrea Steves & Timothy Furstnau who work together as the Fictilis group. They have been working around the topic of waste and e-waste as well and in later discussions we all agreed on that when we talk about electronic waste we also have to think about the waste produced in the production of our electronics which is a much bigger, but less visible part of electronic waste.

Gems and Minerals gallery at National Museum of Natural History:

 

Food, agriculture, animal-farming, waste and online anti-fraud activism were the main topics of the ‘Ecologies of Creative Activism’ panel chaired by Stacey Storms. The topics differed a lot, but what was common in all of our practices was an element of collaboration an co-creation. As artists and artist groups, all of us found it important that the works, in one way or another, are connected to a community. No matter if it is a connection to other goat farmers, or understanding motives and learning strategies of activists who use creative strategies to prevent cyber-crime, or locals who are interested where our crap ends up it is flushed down the toilet. All presented projects with elements of gathering and sharing knowledge together with others.

IMG_1848

New Media Caucus panel Ecologies of Creative Activism at the CAA conference

In addition to the panel we also had a chance to present our latest work Megacorp., at the New Media Caucus Showcase. This was an evening event at the beautiful auditorium of Corcoran School of the Arts + Design at the George Washington University. Here, fifteen artist or artist groups each had six minutes of time to present their work. Of course, the themes and topics varied enormously and presentation styles ranged from classical slide presentations to audiovisual manifestos and dance performances, yet the format worked well with the networking reception that took place afterwards. We returned some days later to the Corcoran School of the Arts + Design for the opening of the ‘Wildcat Hauling’exhibition by Fictilis. The Wildcat Hauling project is interesting and it showed us that the problem of dumping electronic waste is not just a problem of developing countries like we experienced during a research trip to Ghana. It also happens in poor neighborhoods of developed countries, places that are often designed to be as hidden as other far away places where our trash ends up out of our sight.

New Media Caucus Showcase:

Wildcat Hauling exhibition by Fictilis:

 

After the New Media Caucus showcase and panel participation, we spent five days in New York City where we continued our “passive reconnaissance” observations of fraudulent Megacorp. businesses. The Megacorp. is a corporate conglomerate inspired by its equally powerful counterparts in science fiction. The artwork is based on a collection of fraudulent websites that we scraped from the Internet and analyzed in an artistic installation. Part of the research is to visit the addresses where the companies claim to have their headquarters and look for traces of the fraudsters. This way we could document 12 additional business locations that will become part of a video work.

megacorp_nyc

 

Visiting all of these addresses was another way of exploring the city. It took most of our days in New York to travel from one location to another, but we had time for some exhibitions in between. One of the most contemporary exhibitions was the #makeamericagreatagain at Whitebox gallery. This group exhibition, curated by Raul Zamudio, Juan Puntes and Co-curated by Blanca de la Torre, coexists with the Democratic and Republican primaries, which had just started during our visit. The exhibition title is extracted from Donald Trump’s campaign slogan and it critically examines the fear-arousing rhetoric in the American social and political landscape. The hash tagged title of the exhibition also aims to encourage visitors to share images and comments from the exhibition as an intervention that interferes with existing social media sites created for Trump’s campaign. Some of the artworks, such as the Donald Trump piñata by artist Pablo Helguera, were rather direct comments on the primaries. Other works, such as Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese video work of a melting ice sculpture of the phrase ‘middle class’, reflect more deeply upon the fears of a disappearing middle class. According to social scientists, one of the reasons for Trump’s success lies in the fears of a white middle class losing their privilege. The article, The Rise of American Authoritarianism, presents an angle on the current political landscape in USA, but it is easy to draw parallels to existing political movements in Europe as well. Both the exhibition and the article reflect upon the fear that current politics is generating in the American public. For example, artist Farideh Sakhaeifar approaches the theme of war from a curious perspective in her work, “Acquired from the above by the present owner”, in which she documents how U.S. and British Army gear that have been smuggled from Iraq and Afghanistan, are sold on the black market in Iran. By purchasing these items and interviewing Iranian families that sell illegal military accessories, Sakhaeifar offers alternative stories to these items connected to war. Also included was Joseph De Lappe’s participatory project that is a commentary on American war policies, particularly the use of drones. In his work, “In drones we trust”, he makes drone stamps and green ink available and encourages visitors to make drones also visible on the dollar bills (best suited on the 20 dollar bill). The exhibition blends activism, social awareness and art through interference on social media, and is hopefully generating some new questions in the minds of the general public as well.

#makeamericagreatagain at Whitebox:

 

We found another exhibition with a compelling subject at Apexart. The “Setting out” exhibition, organized by Shona Kitchen, Aly Ogasian and Jennifer Dalton Vincent, “seeks to untangle the terms that motivate and define contemporary expeditions”. This exhibition does not focus on artists or artworks in itself, but blends together artists’ expeditions with archival materials from the Museum of Natural History. No matter if the explorer is an artist or a scientist, the numerous items, images, books, maps and tools collected on tables and walls speak about human curiosity to see beyond each horizon. It is hard to understand the meaning of each item on display, or even how they connect, but the overall feeling about the exhibition portrays the process of artistic research, in which topics are approached without quite knowing what one is doing, but the often playful strategies result in new understandings. In some of the projects, science and fiction merge, such as in Agnes Meyer-Brandis’ Moon Goose Analogue. This fascinating coexistent of science and imagination was also presented in a small exhibition called “Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction 1780-1910” at the National Museum of American History. This exhibition presented a time in history when new technologies, exhibitions to the arctic or undersea, new knowledge about the universe, or discovery of dinosaur fossils were inspiring the emerging genre of science fiction. In combination, these two exhibitions showed why the union of art and science often results in amazing discoveries.

“Setting out” at Apexart and “Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction 1780-1910” at the National Museum of American History:

 

NMC-Hub blog post by KairUs (Linda Kronman and Andreas Zingerle, kairus.org)

Call for Panel Proposals – CAA New York 2017

The New Media Caucus invites panel proposals for a 1.5-hour affiliated panel session to be held during the 2017 College Art Association annual conference in New York.

Proposals must address issues related to new media. Panel chairs will submit the proposal and organize the session, including its call for submissions. The NMC Exhibitions & Events Committee will assist with providing liaison to CAA, administration, publicity, etc.

PROPOSALS MUST INCLUDE:

  • completed Proposal Application Form – DOWNLOAD HERE
  • 3-page CV, submitted as PDF
  • 300 – 600 word abstract addressing:

concept for the panel
areas of investigation
questions the panel will raise
specific topic areas presenters might address

PUBLISHING REQUIREMENT: Media-N Journal of the New Media Caucus will publish a conference edition after the CAA conference, showcasing conference proceedings sponsored by the NMC. To this end, Individuals are required to submit materials for the journal edition. Media-N offers flexibility regarding how to achieve the publishing requirement. Once invitations are accepted, the Editor-in-Chief of Media-N will contact the chair(s) to further discuss and plan for the publishing requirement. All materials for publication must be completed by mid-April after the conference.

NOTES:

  • two people may apply as co-chairs.
  • multiple proposals are not accepted.
  • panel chairs (and panelists) must be NMC members. 
There are no membership fees. JOIN NMC
  • panel chairs (and panelists) do not need to be CAA members.
  • NMC does not fund conference fees, transportation, or hotels for chairs or panelists.
  • Panel participants must either register for the CAA conference or buy a one-day pass.
  • Chairing or presenting during a 1.5 hour session does not disqualify you from chairing a panel or serving as a panelist in a general CAA session.

TIMELINE:
Peer review will occur shortly after the deadline. 
Notification of acceptance will be by April 18.

DEADLINE:
 April 7, 2016. Email submissions to Tohm Judson at tohm@tohmjudson.com

Games++

games++ is a free 12-hour game development event where participants build games from scratch over 10 hours, then put down their mice and pencils so the public can play their creations. Individuals and teams of all ages and experience are welcome - last year we had over 120 participants and hope you will join us!

Designed as a collaborative, communal making experience, games++ incrementally adds to the pool of amazing, experimental, unique, one-off games in the world.

http://gamesplusplus.org/

 

CFP – Digital Humanities – MMLA – Due April 5th

The Digital Humanities section of the Midwest Modern Language Association is accepting proposals for scholarly and literary presentations that examine, complicate, or challenge concepts of borders and bordering as imagined across multiple modes of digital production. The MMLA conference will take place in St. Louis, Missouri, November 10-13, 2016.

We invite proposals that broadly interpret the conference theme, “Border States,” through multiple disciplinary lenses, such as computational text analysis, critical/creative media, game studies, data mining/archiving, and digital pedagogy. We are especially interested in presentations that explore the impact of digital media on literary production.

Please send a 200-300-word abstract and a brief bio to the section co-chairs, Melinda Weinstein (mweinstei@ltu.edu.) and Francesco Levato (falevat@ilstu.edu), by April 5th, 2016. Include in your abstract your name, institutional affiliation, e-mail address and paper title.

http://www.luc.edu/mmla/convention/2016permanentsectioncallforpapers/

The Midwest Modern Language Association is a non-profit organization of teachers and scholars of literature, language, and culture. A regional affiliate of the Modern Language Association, the MMLA provides a forum for disseminating scholarship and improving teaching in the fields of literary and cultural criticism.

Modular Software: Creating Performative Tools for Artists

Over the past two years, I have become increasingly interested in the rich potential of working with hybrid analog and digital systems for real time performative processing. There is an interesting tension that occurs when combining the precision of digital with the unpredictability of analog. I used a hybrid setup for my recent performance Multiplying Muybridge where I used an analog synthesizer to create live sound that was manipulated by a theremin-like depth sensor that outputs control voltage to the system. This instrument, along with a handful of oscillators, are digitized in MIDI and used to generate patterns in Processing. Those patterns are then sent to Max via Syphon to chromakey 6 separate videos into the patterns. Each of the three patterns can be controlled via a USB MIDI controller, two knobs for each X and Y direction. I use OSC (Open Sound Control) to pass that from MAX to Processing.

Why describe this in such detail? I am interested in the notion of open modular systems of making hybrid works. Philosophically, this tool creation and workflow is inspired by the design sensibilities of analog video synthesizers created in the 1970’s by toolmakers such as Dan Sandin, Bill Hearn and Dave Jones. The relationship that these systems had with control voltage interfaces for maximum variability stands in stark contrast to many of the professional software packages used today.

In December 2015, my friend and fellow artist Jason Bernagozzi, started a collaboration to develop software tools for time-based media artists as a way to support the fundraising efforts of Signal Culture. We wanted to make software inspired by the open systems of these early video pioneers and philosophically grounded in modularity. We are interested in creating tools that are real time, performative, modular, and exploratory. The first app Jason and I wanted to work on was a process inspired by the classic Frame Buffer created by legendary toolmaker Dave Jones of Dave Jones Design, who has made significant contributions to the history of video art. The Frame Buffer application saves a series of video frames into memory that repeat over one another within the keyed areas of either a lumakey or a chromakey. The process is simple, however, what we wanted to focus on was how to make the application able to be controlled by a wide range of sources.

The first thing we created was the capability to ingest a wide range of video sources, such as web cameras, external cameras (via fierwire or thunderbolt), QuickTime movie files, and to or from syphon. We designed it to cover a wide range of possible resolutions from Classic Frame Buffer 256 x 256 all the way to 1920 x 1080 HD. You can also control the frame rate of the video output, which can be sent out to external devices, recorded to a QuickTime, syphoned out to another software application, or be full-screened to be used for a performance. As far as the process itself, we wanted it to be intuitive for the user, which makes for a difficult balance of fine tuning and narrowing down parameter ranges without making it so limiting that it acts like a filter you would apply in a nonlinear editing or compositing program.

There are seven parameters that can be explored in the app. Being concerned with performability, we made it so all the parameters could be controlled via MIDI or OSC. The user could have an analog synth control the parameters, hook in a CV->MIDI interface or use an OSC touch interface on your phone control the app, making it able to run video and control between several software packages such as Ableton Live, VDMX, Processing, etc all in real time.

We released the Frame Buffer app in January 2016 as a part of Signal Culture’s sustainability fundraising campaign. Signal Culture is a nonprofit experimental media art organization offering residencies, resources, and exhibition opportunities. The Frame Buffer is the first of six applications we have planed for 2016. Check out the Signal Culture App club for more details. The exciting part of making these tools is seeing what artists make with them. I want to share two works by artists that have used the Frame Buffer in their new works, “Negative Vibes/////Rough Idol” by Patrick James Cain, a sound and video artist residing in Washington D.C., and “Mix Buffer” by Alan Powell, a Video Artist and Associate Professor at Arcadia University.

“Negative Vibes/////Rough Idol”, Patrick James Cain, 2016 Image courtesy of the Artist

Negative Vibes/////Rough Idol”, Patrick James Cain, 2016. Image courtesy of the Artist

“Mix Buffer”, Alan Powell, 2016 Image courtesy of the Artist

Mix Buffer”, Alan Powell, 2016. Image courtesy of the Artist

Jason and I are now finalizing our second app titled Maelstrom, which was based on a process I developed for a 2012 project “Life in the Maelstrom”. Maelstrom combines real time lumakeying and pixel sorting paired with digital feedback to create repetitions into infinity. The app allows the user to control the direction of the feedback, zoom in and out, and rotate the angle of each repetition in space. During the development process of Maelstrom, I created a new performance titled “Synaptic Transmissions.” Working with the app in relation to audio visual performance led us to new ideas for future apps, in particular methods that would help create audiovisual sync. A simple example of this would be to use frame difference and Image brightness average for MIDI or OSC output.

We are not alone in developing creative tools for artists. There is an exciting renaissance of artists and toolmakers sharing and creating tools. Our goals are pedagogical in nature, to think about process versus effects. An effect is meant as an illusion, a real time process however can be used to articulate new visual and aural metaphors that come out of discovery and a relationship between the artist and their tools. In many ways this connects real time media production to music. It is not the inherent sound of the instrument that is significant, it is the choices the artist makes that creates the melody.

By: Eric Souther, New Media Artist, Assistant Professor of New Media at Indiana University South Bend

 

Media-N Fall 2016 Issue CFP

Uncovering News: Reporting and Forms of New Media Art

Media-N -2016 fall issue: V. 12 N. 3

Guest Editors

Abigail Susik, Willamette University

Grant Taylor, Lebanon Valley College

Editor-In-Chief

Kevin Hamilton

Media-N, the Journal of the New Media Caucus, invites submissions for an issue about new media art and its relation to news, reportage, and journalism. Relevant subjects could include: media artworks that address news as subject or form; the influence of new media art on journalism; or critical/historical analysis of the reporting of new media art in popular or disciplinary press venues.

Media artists have mined news and journalism as raw material, as distribution form, and as a rhetorical act of reportage. Artists such as Paper Tiger Television or Negativland drew from television news broadcasts in their critical cut-ups. Feminist and aboriginal video art collectives such as Amelia Productions emerged in Vancouver out of counter-news video documentary efforts. Among contemporary tactical media artists such as the Yes Men or Critical Art Ensemble, mainstream news serves as distribution method or site of intervention. Still others have sought to critique the reliable reporter position of modern journalism, or to create new alternative networks for counter-hegemonic news production.

Media art has also benefitted from many a new platform for reporting and distribution of news about new works and ideas. Email listservs, mailed newsletters, faxes, episodic video, magazines, radio, or social media, have not only served as channels for sharing new works, but as forms of expression and community. Net artists learned about other net.art through the Thing, Rhizome, or even the Well before deploying their own web artworks back into those spaces. Sound artists tuned in to programs on ResonanceFM or San Francisco’s KQED before sending in their own works for broadcast, or gaining a show of their own.

Submissions for this special issue on new media art and news, reportage, and journalism might address the following questions:

  • How do new media artworks engage with journalism, information leaks, and information dissemination?
  • How and why has mainstream news covered media art as a story?
  • How are new media forms and aesthetics, from locative media to visualization or even physical computing, altering the work of journalists?
  • What is the status of new media arts reporting and criticism today? How do modes of communication, transmission and reception inform new media art?
  • How is the field of new media art as a whole affected by reporting, reviews and criticism of developing trends, and what is the significance of the modalities in which this dialogue takes shape?
  • How will we write about art and technology in the future, given new and emerging publishing platforms?
  • How has new media art as a field been particularly influenced by news and reportage as a primary disciplinary component in the work of dissemination, critique, and knowledge construction?

 

Media-N is an English language journal, and all submissions must be received in English adhering to the standards set by the 16th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.

(http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/)

Media-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus (ISSN: 1942-017X) is a scholarly, invitational, and double blind peer-reviewed journal. It is open to submissions in the form of theoretical papers, reports, and reviews on new media artworks. The journal provides a forum for national and international New Media Caucus members and non-members featuring their scholarly research, artworks and projects.

TIMELINE:

June 15, 2016: Deadline for submission of abstracts/proposals.

July 15, 2016: Notification of acceptance.

September 15, 2016: Deadline for submission of final papers.

ABSTRACT GUIDELINES:

Please send your submission proposal by email adhering to the following:

Proposal Title, and a 300-500 word Proposal Description. Include your Email(s), your Title(s)/Affiliation(s) (the institution/organization you work with ­ if applicable, or independent scholar/practitioner).

On a separate document, send a Resume (no longer than 3 pages).

NOTE: Materials should be submitted in English, as Microsoft Word documents (.doc or .docx).

SEND THE SUBMISSION TO:

Email to: asusik@willamette.edu - AND – taylor@lvc.edu