Looking forward::: DECEMBER 2015 ARRAYLIST THEME: GAMES! –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

ARRAY [ ] // www.arrayproject.com

We are happy to announce the upcoming ArrayList discussion theme: New Media Foundations: Games! --> starts December 1, 2015

DECEMBER 2015 GUEST THREAD LEADERS::::

Theresa Devine (New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University; Phoenix)
Theresa Devine is an Assistant Professor in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. Theresa received her BFA in Painting and Printmaking at Texas A & M University - Corpus Christi in 1991 and her MFA in Painting at University of Houston in 1994. In her personal artwork she explores the intersection of adversity and play in the media of toys and games. http://theresadevine.com/ As Director of the Studio 4 Gaming Innovation research lab, Theresa focuses on researching games to redefine and explore what they can be and how they can be used to initiate transformation in our society. http://studio4gaminginnovation.com/

j.duran (Public High School Teacher/Private Post Secondary Instructor; Chicago)
j.duran is an artist and pedagogue who creates Rube Goldberg machines out of voltage differences. His process centers in the tension created through simultaneous reduction and abstraction that often manifests itself in creating code. He was granted an MFA in New Media in 2009 after earning a BS in Computer Science in 2001. duran has taught courses in Data Visualization, Interactive Art, and Systems at a public university in Chicago. Currently, j.duran is a Computer Science Teacher and the CTE Chair at a public high school where he teaches classes in games, new media, and computer science. In addition, he also teaches Experimental Games at a private post-secondary institution in Chicago.

Patrick Jagoda (University of Chicago; Chicago)
Patrick Jagoda is an Assistant Professor of English and an affiliate of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago. He specializes in media studies, twentieth and twenty-first century American literature, and digital game theory and design. Alongside this position, he is the co-founder of the Game Changer Chicago Design Lab and serves as a co-editor of the interdisciplinary journal Critical Inquiry. Jagoda is a published author with research and teaching expertise in: New Media; 20th and 21st Century American Fiction, Film, and Television; Critical Theory; American Cultural Studies; Game Studies; Science Studies; and Game Design. He co-edited two special issues: New Media and American Literature for American Literature (2013) and Comics & Media: A Special Issue of Critical Inquiry (2014). Two of his books will be published in 2016: Network Aesthetics, and The Game Worlds of Jason Rohrer (co-authored). Jagoda completed his PhD in the Department of English at Duke University in 2010, along with a graduate certificate in Information Science and Information Studies. http://www.patrickjagoda.com, https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/gamechanger/about/

Alex Myers (Creighton University; Omaha)
My research interests are far ranging and include games, architecture, violence, fear, mysticism, ambiguity, perception, movement, nature, extinction, death, and loss. I'd say that I'm interested in systems, but I think everything human is built upon systems. It's how we think. My methods and materials change to fit the needs of the project, but I spend a lot of time working in 3D environments like Blender and Unity. I have exhibited at NP3 in Groningen, Nikolaj Kunsthallen in Copenhagen, Lab for Electronic Art and Performance, Berlin, Interaccess in Toronto, FACT in Liverpool, and LACDA in Los Angeles, among others. I've twice been awards the Art and Culture Prize of Groningen, The Netherlands. Several years ago I received my MFA(Hons) in Interactive Media & Environments at The Frank Mohr Instituut of the Hanze University of Applied Science in Groningen, The Netherlands. In addition to making all sorts of weird stuff, I am an Assistant Professor of Design at Creighton University in Omaha, NE. I also occasionally mentor at the Kent Bellows Studio and Center for Visual Arts and give talks and workshops about Art Games, Interaction Design, and New Media Art.

Phoenix Perry (Goldsmiths, Founder Code Liberation Foundation, Co-Founder Dozen Eyes; London/NYC)
Phoenix Perry is an experienced developer, accidental public figure and general rebel rabble rouser. She's currently a lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London where she teaches physical computing and games. She builds emergent play environments that encourage group dynamics while engaging in the subtle art of suggesting games can address larger concerns in society. Her research attempts to extend the human senses through augmenting the perception of emotion. As a card carrying member of the gaming feminist killjoy party, she engages in regular acts of mild civil disobedience. You can find her in hacklabs burning herself on soldering irons or coffee shops caffeinating while punching code in chemically induced fits of brilliance before napping. Additionally, she's the property of a grey Egyptian Mau. All appearances and engagements are by the cat's permission only. http://phoenixperry.com, https://github.com/phoenixperry

Scott Richmond (Wayne State University; Detroit)
Scott C. Richmond is Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of English at Wayne State University, where his teaching and research focus on avant-garde cinema and experimental media, film theory and media theory, and phenomenology and critical theory. His work has appeared, among other places, in World Picture, Discourse, and the Journal of Visual Culture. He is co-editor, with Elizabeth Reich, of a special issue of Film Criticism entitled "New Approaches to Cinematic Identification." His first book, Cinema's Bodily Illusions: Flying, Floating, and Hallucinating, is forthcoming in fall 2016 from the University of Minnesota Press. On games and gaming, Scott has published an essay on boredom and gaming, “Vulgar Boredom: What Andy Warhol Can Teach Us about Candy Crush” (in JVC), and has presented widely on first-person gaming. He also regularly teaches both with and about games in humanities classes, especially low-fi, text-based, indie, experimental, and avant-garde games. In these classes, students work with games across many modalities, including analysis, research, theory, design, and making.

Brian Schrank (DePaul University; Chicago)
Brian Schrank is an artist and assistant professor at DePaul University in Chicago who develops games on experimental platforms such as puppets, installations, AR, and VR. His book "Avant-garde Videogames: Playing with Technoculture" places games within the context of art history and the avant-garde. His controversial game "Pedandeck" challenges conventions by prompting people to play the Grammar Nazi or Race Card in their everyday lives. He earned his Ph.D. in digital media and videogames from Georgia Tech. http://www.brianschrank.com


Arraylist series details here: http://arrayproject.com/content/discussion Subscribe here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist The purpose of ArrayList is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). Subscribe to the listserv so that you can read [fly-on-the-wall is a-ok AKA lurking] and/or respond to the written activity, and read the archives. We hope to engage a wide range of critical perspectives so please chime in with thoughts and questions. Sincerely, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY[ ] founders