Tag Archives: announcement

Videofreex – Networked Conversations

Videofreex social broadcasting pioneers Skip Blumberg, Nancy Cain, and Mary Curtis Ratcliff ::: Monday, March 27, 9:00pm-10:00pm (EDT-US) (UTC-4) ::: live & online & global via Internet chat.

Login & participate:
https://connect.ntu.edu.sg/thirdspacenetwork/
Select “Guest,” type your name, and “Enter Room.”

| About the Videofreex |

While television has traditionally been a passive medium, programmed media received by the masses, the Videofreex turned the paradigm upside down when they rented the Maple Tree Farm and established Lanesville TV in upstate New York in the early 1970s. It was here, in this setting far removed from the urban bustle of the New York City media center, that they began their experimental television project to forge the first pirate tv station in America.

The Videofreex story has legendary roots, when David Cort and Parry Teasdale met at Woodstock, wielding video cameras to document the Festival and the social movement that was exploding at the time. Afterwards they joined forces with Skip Blumberg, Nancy Cain, Bart Friedman, Davidson Gigliotti, Mary Curtis Ratcliff, Carol Vontobel, Ann Woodward, and the late Chuck Kennedy, to form a media collective with a mutual passion for video and its potential for catalyzing political, artistic and social transformation.

The Videofreex in their own funky way, reinvented television, reversing its power as a broadcast medium for engaging community, a creative medium for storytelling, an artisans approach to television, collapsing the space of transmission and reception to connect people locally with stories and collective narrative. The Videofreex foresaw television not as a corporate controlled delivery mechanism for reinforcing consumerism and mainstream popular culture, but rather as an artists’ platform for invention and social interaction.

The Videofreex embraced radical television in their interviews with political activists such as Abbie Hoffman; they captured alternative culture in America during the 1970s when it wasn’t properly covered by mainstream media; they reinvented broadcast journalism with their direct style that challenged packaged, network television news with its slick format; and perhaps most importantly, they saw video as a collaborative, social medium, a people’s media: encouraging viewer participation through the free and immediate exchange of ideas and images.

| About Networked Conversations |

Networked Conversations is a series of live, online interviews hosted by Randall Packer, a presentation of the Third Space Network. The series features media artists, curators, writers, and activists discussing a broad range of topics at the intersection of social, political and aesthetic issues relevant to net culture. Networked Conversations collapses geographical and cultural boundaries via participatory Internet chat, and is free & open & accessible from anywhere in the world.

Upcoming events:

April 24 — Kit Galloway, founder of the
legendary Electronic Café International (ECI)
in Santa Monica, California

May 13 — Annie Abrahams, pioneering Internet
performance artist from Montpellier, France.

For more information, visit:
http://www.thirdspacenetwork.com

The Third Space Network (3SN) is an Internet broadcast channel for live performance and conversation, online and global, hosted by Randall Packer

The Artery Enters into Special Artistic Collaboration with Award Winning Video Artist Ronen Sharabani

snap-to-grid-sharabani

New York, NY, December 6, 2016 – Renowned Art + Technology company The Artery, which is actively expanding its award winning talent base by seeking the most talented digital artists in the world, has established a special artistic collaboration with acclaimed Video Artist Ronen Sharabani, a 2006 Cannes Gold Lion Prize winner. Vico Sharabani, The Artery’s Founder and Creative Director, as well as a brother of Ronen Sharabani, made the announcement.

This new collaboration between The Artery and Sharabani has been designed for two purposes:

  • To develop and present innovative and original Video Content to museums, art galleries, and other special artistic venues around the world; and
  • To integrate Virtual Reality and other new technologies into Ronen Sharabani’s upcoming art exhibits, installations, and live special events around the world.

Regarding this new collaboration with his brother, Vico Sharabani said, “We are extremely excited about our new relationship with Ronen, a digital artist with the highest caliber of talent! Working in tandem with him, this new collaboration will allow us the first time to really ‘show off’ our skills and expertise in the world of Art, as well as our unique and innovative capabilities in the world of Technology. Ronen will be conceiving, producing and presenting never-before-seen artistic installations and experiences all over the world.”

He adds, “We want our clients to know about this new collaboration because it exemplifies how The Artery can bring deep artistic conversation and experience to their advertising projects. This cross pollination of art plus technology is the DNA behind our company. Historically, we’ve delivered feature film level imagery to commercials and music videos, and the latest, interactive technologies to enhance advertising campaigns and experiential experiences. Our art plus technology expertise is what makes our company truly unique, as we bring this approach to all of our projects, large and small.”

Ronen Sharabani said, “My constant urge to create has allowed me to produce a number of well-received exhibits so far, but as a solo artist, there have always been limits to how far I could go by myself. The exciting new collaboration with The Artery allows me to make a major jump to the next level. The Artery is a very high-end post house that compliments my work process as we both combine art and technology in innovative ways. By joining forces, we break the borders and barriers of what has been possible so far within the worlds of digital art and VR. The Artery is truly a unique company, and Vico has always been a person who can stretch the limits of computers and their capabilities. He is a highly improvisational artist, has mastered the blending of Art and Technology, and can create imagery from the 5% of hidden software that you can’t easily get from plug-ins. I am really looking forward to see what the future will bring!”

The Artery’s new relationship with Ronen Sharabani adds to the company’s existing collaborations with other noted video artists whose works have been exhibited widely in galleries and museums in the United States, as well as China. These exhibitions include those seen at the Whitney Museum of Art, Mass Moca, The Contemporary Austin, Zhejiang Art Museum, Hangzhou China, and many more.

ABOUT UPCOMING & RECENT RONEN SHARABANI PROJECTS:

At present, Sharabani is preparing for his next solo art exhibition, which will take place at the Nahum Gutman Museum of Art in Tel Aviv starting on December 20th. Entitled “Snap to Grid,” Sharabani’s new work, which he calls a “Smart Exhibition,” will be comprised of imagery projections against a very large wall at the museum. “Snap to Grid” will include computer renderings and 3D environments which will also be translated to VR. Sharabani and The Artery hope to export this VR experience during early 2017, to a live installation located in New York’s Union Square. As such, people in New York will be able to experience the same imagery simultaneously with people physically located at the Gutman Museum in Tel Aviv.

In late September 2016, The Paul E. Singer Foundation sponsored a collaboration between Start-Up Nation Central and Artis to create an interactive showcase of the innovations in the Israeli art world and art-related technology solutions. The event, which featured a talk and presentation by Ronen Sharabani, was held at Sotheby’s New York, in front of an audience of more than 150 New-York collectors, art curators, and business related executives from the art industry, and was the first in a series of events.

Additionally, Sharabani, in conjunction with technology supplied to him by The Artery, also presented a large projected exhibit at the Contemporary Austin during May 2016. His exhibit was presented in celebration of the Driscoll Villa at Laguna Gloria’s hundred year anniversary. For the event, Sharabani created a site-specific outdoor and indoor video projection, entitled “Matchbox,” featuring Israeli dancer Iyar Elezra of the Batsheva Dance Company, with music by Avi Belleli. Matchbox’s running time was 15 minutes on a loop – the projection ran for two hours. For more info about this exhibition, please see: http://www.thecontemporaryaustin.org/event/ronen-sharabani/

Regarding Sharabani’s “Matchbox” exhibit in Austin, Andrea Mellard, the Director of Public Programs & Community Engagement with the Contemporary Austin Museum, said, “Ronen Sharabani transformed the museum’s well-known architecture using cutting-edge technology. The incredible projections of his project ‘Matchbox’ made familiar details hidden, while his powerful imagery seemed to emerge into three-dimensions. People who know and love the building could not believe their eyes.”

ABOUT RONEN SHARABANI:

Ronen Sharabani, a 2006 winner of the Cannes Gold Lion Prize for “Best Creative Commercial,” lives and works in Tel Aviv, Israel. Ritual, struggle, faith, and politics take center stage in his works, not for didactic purposes, but as the gateway for transformational experiences.

Profoundly influenced by his experiences in his home country of Israel, where his Israeli “survivalist” thinking has colored his artistic perceptions and POV, Sharabani’s films and videos blend movement, performance, architecture, and light into intensely visual and sensory projects. Musical scores, replete with chanting and techno-like sounds, often overlay Sharabani’s moving images, allowing his films to be at once secular and spiritual.

Sharabani’s recent Art Exhibitions include “Matchbox” at Austin’s Driscoll Villa in celebration of the Laguna Gloria’s hundred year anniversary (May 2016); his public installation entitled “Blocks,” a centerpiece at the Musrara Mix Festival in Jerusalem in 2015  and “Chairs,” another of his public installations, which was featured during “White Night” in Tel Aviv in 2014.

During the course of his career, Ronen Sharabani has worked for a number of film, advertising and production companies, including The Artery, McCann-Erickson, Dreamworks, and Gravity VFX/Tel Aviv. Sharabani was Lead Compositor on the 2012 film “A Late Quartet,” and was Flame Compositor on the 2008 film “Ghost Town. He also served as the On-Set Digital FX Supervisor, while working with Rhino FX, on John Sayles’s 2004 feature film, “Silver City.”

In 2015, Sharabani appeared as himself in the short documentary film interview “Art in Clubs.” He earned a Certificate as a graduate of the New York Studio School, which he attended from 1999-2003.

ABOUT THE ARTERY:

Based in New York City, The Artery is a highly regarded Art +Technology company that designs, creates and produces unique and compelling visual content across all screens. The company has established partnerships with iconic brands, ad agencies, and entertainment studios to create high profile and compelling visual content for feature films, TV programs, commercials, music videos and art installations.

Utilizing breakthrough technologies, The Artery’s uniquely talented, curated teams -- which include its Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality unit, led by Creative & Technical Director Ronen Taschum, and its Experiential arm, led by Creative Director Yaron Tsinman -- also create stunning virtual reality content, experiential brand events, and 360-degree experiences for clients around the globe. The Artery offers custom-tailored A-teams and production pipelines, focused solely on efficiently achieving outstanding results.

With its global perspective, top-tier talent, newest technologies and unlimited creative capabilities, The Artery has the proven expertise to efficiently deliver extraordinary content, branding, and multimedia experiences, worldwide.

For Further Information visit The Artery’s Social Media Sites:

ART NEWS FROM SIGGRAPH 2016

HIGHLY INTERACTIVE ART GALLERY PRESENTATION - 'DATA MATERIALITIES'

TO BE SPECIAL FEATURE AT SIGGRAPH 2016 IN ANAHEIM

CHICAGO, June 16, 2016—Highly interactive art exhibits from around the world will be a special feature during SIGGRAPH 2016, the world's leading annual interdisciplinary educational experience showcasing the latest in computer graphics and interactive techniques. With the tagline "Render the Possibilities," SIGGRAPH 2016 will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center, 24–28 July 2016.

This year's Art Gallery, assembled under the banner "Data Materialities," represents a unique collection of 10 highly interactive installations created from 2003–2016.

SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery Chair Jonah Brucker-Cohen said, "We have made a special effort to bring back large-scale, highly immersive displays for the Art Gallery. Our title, 'Data Materialities,' illustrates the fact that in 2016, we are all constantly surrounded by networks, information, and data. Whether these stimuli consist of electromagnetic frequencies or physical wired connections, networks are everywhere, consuming and permeating our offices, homes, schools, and public indoor and outdoor spaces. 'Data Materialities' exposes this plethora of data and transforms it to incarnations of tangibility that not only showcase their complexity, but also allow us to relate to them on a human scale. By injecting humor and kinetic energy to this year's exposition, the Art Gallery will make light of these data platforms and present them on a grand scale to reveal their ubiquity."

Artwork and artists for the SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery Chair are selected by the program chair and not by a jury. This year's Art Gallery will be open to attendees during the following dates and times:

Sun, 24 July | Noon – 5:30 pm
Mon, 25 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Tue, 26 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Wed, 27 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Thu, 28 July | 10 am – 1 pm

"Data Materialities" Art Gallery highlights include:

Submergence | Chris Bennewith, Liam Birtles, Oliver Brown, Gaz Bushell, and Anthony Rowe, Squidsoup
"Submergence" is a large, immersive, walkthrough experience that uses up to 8,064 individual points of suspended light to create feelings of presence and movement within physical space. This video from YouTube user Nick Hunter shows the installation at the Geneva Mapping Festival.

Pixelbots | Paul Beardsley, Disney Research Zürich
Disney Research Zürich created a new kind of display in which pixels, called "Pixelbots," are represented as small colorful mobile robots which create cartoon-like images or animations. Pixelbots can be seen on the Disney Research YouTube channel, where they present a "Story of the Universe" animation, including a fish, a dinosaur, and a human.

The Kinetic Story Teller | Tine Bech, Independent Artist
"The Kinetic Story Teller" installation investigates how art, technology, and playfulness can create new systems of communication by materializing data through kinetic interaction - and offer people new ways of connecting with each other in public spaces. Two beautiful swings light up and display people's social media messages on screens, encouraging participants to connect while they play.

Plinko Poetry | Peiqui Su and Deqing Sun, New York University
A playful, interactive installation, "Plinko Poetry" has its roots in both the famous TV game show "The Price Is Right" and experimental blackout poetry. Every player can be both a winner and a poet. Drawing source text from current @nytimes and @FoxNews tweets, players can absurdly re-contextualize news headlines that are often overloaded with meaning.

For more information on the SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery, please see: s2016.siggraph.org/content/art-gallery.

To register for SIGGRAPH 2016, visit s2016.siggraph.org/registration.

To follow conference news on social media, check us out on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube, Instagram, or the ACM SIGGRAPH blog.

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About SIGGRAPH 2016
The annual SIGGRAPH conference is a five-day interdisciplinary educational experience in the latest computer graphics and interactive techniques, including a three-day commercial exhibition that attracts hundreds of companies from around the world. The conference also hosts the international SIGGRAPH Computer Animation Festival, showcasing works from the world's most innovative and accomplished digital film and video creators. Juried and curated content includes outstanding achievements in time-based art, scientific visualization, visual effects, games, real-time graphics, virtual reality, and narrative shorts. SIGGRAPH 2016 will take place from 24-28 July 2016 in Anaheim, California. Visit the SIGGRAPH 2016 website or follow SIGGRAPH on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or Instagram for more detailed information.

About ACM
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, is the world's largest educational and scientific computing society, uniting educators, researchers, and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources, and address the field's challenges. ACM strengthens the computing profession's collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for lifelong learning, career development, and professional networking.

Media Contact:
Dan Harary
Public Relations Director
+1.310.859.1831
danharary@siggraph.org

Upcoming Events: IMRC at University of Maine

Located on the University of Maine Campus the Innovative Media, Research and Commercialization Center (IMRC Center), at Stewart Commons, is a 15,000+ square foot facility provides comfortable, state of the art prototyping facilities, audio and video production spaces, a resource library, performance and installation spaces, classrooms, and offices. IMRC is outfitted with a variety of tools and equipment, including a full shop, 3D printers and 3D scanner, computer controlled machine tools, a cutting and engraving laser, plastic vacuum former, large format printers, a range of design and production software, electronics workbenches, video and still cameras, audio recording and mixing equipment, and a variety of tools for supporting interactive environments and installations.

Opened in 2013, the IMRC Center is a hub for learning, creating and producing. It is the most recent of the portfolio of the University of Maine’s facilities that support innovation and economic development. The IMRC Center is supported by a range of expert instructors and a community of collaborators. Visit http://www.imrccenter.com/, where you can find information on the facility, programs and events.

The IMRC has several upcoming events:

FREE movie night at IMRC Center: "Fantastic Planet" On Tuesday, April 5 at 7p.m. the IMRC will host a free and public screening of Fantastic Planet as a part of Tuesday’s at the IMRC, the UMaine Intermedia MFA program’s visiting artist lecture series. Fantastic Planet  is a 1973 cutout stop motion science fiction film by French writer and artist René Laloux. The animated epic that is by turns surreal and lovely, fantastic and graceful, can be seen as allegorical of the relationship between various groups of humans, as well as between humans and animals, drawing on the themes of racism and speciesism. Fantastic Planet is recognizable for its dreamy, psychedelic imagery, that is backed by a soundtrack composed by Alain Goraguer.

Experimental Avant-Garde Music Performance at UMaine: Experimental avant-garde musician id m theft able will perform for the UMaine community on Tuesday, April 12 at 7p.m. as a part of Tuesdays at the IMRC. This concert is free and open to the public. id m theft able performs within and without the realms of noise, avant improvisation, sound poetry, and performance using voice, found objects, electronics, and whatever else is available. He has given hundreds of performances across 4 continents in settings ranging from the humblest of squats to the fanciest of festivals. The hear samples of id m theft able’s work, visit https://idmtheftable.bandcamp.com

FREE Brown Bag Workshop Series: The IMRC invites you to participate in a free workshop series utilizing the unique array of technology that the IMRC has to offer to the residents of the state of Maine. The IMRC serves as a technology and start up incubator for our local communities by providing training and and opening up access to cutting edge technology. This workshop series is free and will run on Thursdays and Fridays at 12:00pm from April 7 - April 29th. Feel free to bring your lunch! Topics covered will include 3D scanning and printing, textile art, photo and video, social media, music and sound, video editing and much more. For a complete list of workshops and sign up information, please visit http://www.imrccenter.com/workshops.

 

Symposium: Pioneers on the Prairie: Celebrating Women in New Media Arts

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago will hold a day-long, free public symposium in Chicago that will examine how women artists use new media to merge art forms, address feminist issues, and critique technology. We would be very grateful if you could forward this information to your members or anyone you feel may be interested.

Pioneers on the Prairie: Celebrating Women in New Media Arts looks at the achievements and strategies of women working in new media in the Midwest from the 1980s onward and will bring together more than a dozen artists from the field to share their stories and ideas. This event is centered around the upcoming release of the book Women in New Media Arts: Perspectives on Innovative Collaboration (University of Illinois Press; edited by Donna Cox, Janine Fron, and Ellen Sandor.) The day will consist of a number of hour-long panels, so attendees can choose to come for a selection of sessions or for the whole time.

Symposium participants include Brenda Laurel, Ellen Sandor, Claudia Hart, Tiffany Holmes, Joan Truckenbrod, Carolina Cruz-Neira, Colleen Bushell, Jane Veeder, Copper Giloth, Barbara Sykes, Maxine Brown, Dana Plepys, Mary Rasmussen, Nan Goggin, Annette Barbier, Abina Manning, Margaret Dolinsky, Stephanie Rothenberg, Terri Kapsalis, Sabrina Raaf, Lee Blalock, Faith Wilding, Jessica Westbrook, and Marlena Novak.

More information can be found about the event here, as well as in a feature article from E+D Magazine.

General information:
Friday, March 18, 2016
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
SAIC Ballroom
112 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60603

Free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served in the morning.

FEBRUARY 2016 ARRAYLIST THEME: Performance [experimental, durational, networked] –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

We are happy to announce the upcoming ArrayList discussion theme:
Performance [experimental, durational, networked]
starts February 1, 2016

ArrayList series details here: http://arrayproject.com/content/discussion

Subscribe here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist

The purpose of the ArrayList year-long series is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). For those new to the listserv format, a listserv is an archived asynchronous thread of email conversation. Subscribe to the listserv so that you can read [fly-on-the-wall is a-ok AKA lurking] and/or respond to the written activity, and read the archives. As always we hope to engage a wide range of critical perspectives so please chime in with thoughts and questions. Sincerely, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY[ ] founders

Performance [experimental, durational, networked]:
with guest thread leaders: Thomas Albrech, Amy Alexander, L[3]^2 (Lee Blalock), Ricardo Dominguez, Kirsten Leenaars, Ellen Mueller, Heather Warren-Crow, Jorge Rojas, Angela Washko

Thomas Albrecht (State University of New York at New Paltz)
Thomas Albrecht’s performance projects have explored ritual and language in public spaces, galleries, and museums, prodding cultural beliefs and individual doubts. Current interests involve duration and elements of Absurdist Theatre, laying bare contingency in human constructions and slippage between truth and fiction. Albrecht has performed throughout the United States and internationally, notably at Grace Exhibition Space, Defibrillator Performance Art Gallery, Panoply Performance Laboratory, Dimanche Rouge Paris, the Queens Museum, and during festivals such as the Brooklyn International Performing Arts Festival, Month of Performance Art Berlin, and Performatorio, IV Muestra de Arte Duracional in the Dominican Republic. He received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, a Master of Arts in Religion from Yale University where he served as the Menil Scholar in residence, and his MFA from the University of Washington. He serves as Assistant Dean in the School of Fine & Performing Arts, and Associate Professor in the Art Department at the State University of New York at New Paltz.

Amy Alexander (University of California, San Diego)
Amy Alexander is a digital media, audiovisual and performance artist who has also worked in film, video, music, tactical media and information technology. She has been making films since 1990 and creating art through programming since 1994. Much of Alexander’s work is performance-­based, often working at intersections of cinema, performing arts, humor, politics, and popular culture. Her current research and practice focuses on expanded approaches to the moving image that reflect contemporary cultural and technological shifts. Alexander has performed and exhibited internationally in clubs and on the street as well as in festivals, museums and on the Internet. She has written and lectured on software art, software as culture, and audiovisual performance, and she has served as a reviewer for festivals and commissions for digital media art, video, and computer music. She was a founding organizer of the runme.org software repository, and she has done residencies at The Media Centre in Huddersfield, UK, and the iota Center in Los Angeles. She is an Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego. More information at: http://amy-alexander.com

L[3]^2 (Lee Blalock) (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
Lee Blalock is an artist who considers what it may mean to live in a future somewhere between here and nowhere. Her research began when she was a kid and would visit her father at his job as a computer programmer / operator. Rules and systems are inherent to her process, while her imagination leans toward the N3w Hum4n. Lee uses her work to create new origin stories, visual or written, which are influenced by a life long interest in speculative fiction and science fiction. Having moved fluidly from an undergraduate STEM education to a career in design and production, she eventually found that all of her conceptual and technical interests converge in the fine arts. The artist makes work using text, performance, computational video and sound, electronics and drawing. Many ideas behind Lee's work attempts to describe the future human, replacing the failed language around identity with the self-constructed and amplified self. This new body (or "NeueBody") often takes the form of abstraction and presents a mix of algorithmic and heuristic behavior. In all cases, Lee's work represents the physical, computational, or behavioral body and uses repetition as a strategy to move past the automatic and into something transformative. As an arts educator, Lee's research is specific to topics referring to the posthuman, systems and cybernetics. She received her Bachelor of Science (Chemistry and Math) from Spelman College and an Associates of Arts (Design) from Bauder College. In 2011, Lee received her Master of Fine Arts from The School of the Art Institute, where she currently teaches in multiple departments. Lee writes and performs under the alphanumeric moniker of L[e]^2. She can be found walking a tightrope in the center of a holographic sphere.

Ricardo Dominguez (University of California, San Diego)
Ricardo Dominguez is a co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group who developed virtual sit-in technologies in solidarity with the Zapatistas communities in Chiapas, Mexico, in 1998. His recent Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab project ( http://bang.transreal.org/) with Brett Stalbaum, Micha Cardenas, Amy Sara Carroll, and Elle Mehrmand, the Transborder Immigrant Tool (a GPS cell phone safety net tool for crossing the Mexico/US border) was the winner of “Transnational Communities Award” (2008), an award funded by Cultural Contact, Endowment for Culture Mexico–US and handed out by the US Embassy in Mexico. It also was funded by CALIT2 and the UCSD Center for the Humanities. The Transborder Immigrant Tool has been exhibited at the 2010 California Biennial (OCMA), Toronto Free Gallery, Canada (2011), The Van Abbemuseum, Netherlands (2013), ZKM, Germany (2013), as well as a number of other national and international venues. The project was also under investigation by the US Congress in 2009-2010 and was reviewed by Glenn Beck in 2010 as a gesture that potentially “dissolved” the U.S. border with its poetry. Dominguez is an associate professor at the University of California, San Diego, in the Visual Arts Department, a Hellman Fellow, and Principal/Principle Investigator at CALIT2 and the Performative Nano-Robotics Lab at SME, UCSD. He also is co-founder of *particle group*, with artists Diane Ludin, Nina Waisman, Amy Sara Carroll, whose art project about nano-toxicology entitled *Particles of Interest: Tales of the Matter Market* has been presented at the House of World Cultures, Berlin (2007), the San Diego Museum of Art (2008), Oi Futuro, Brazil (2008), CAL NanoSystems Institute, UCLA (2009), Medialab-Prado, Madrid (2009), E-Poetry Festival, Barcelona, Spain (2009), Nanosférica, NYU (2010), and SOMA, Mexico City, Mexico (2012): http://hemisphericinstitute.org/hemi/en/particle-group-intro.

Kirsten Leenaars (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
Kirsten Leenaars’ creates participatory video and performance based work. In her practice Leenaars engages with specific people and communities. Her work oscillates between fiction and documentation, reinterprets personal stories and reimagines everyday realities through staging, improvisation and iteration. She examines the very nature of our own constructed realities, the stories we tell our selves and the ones we identify with and explores the way we relate to others. Recent projects include producing a series of 3 performances Notes on Empty Chairs, about loss, community and empathy for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago; creating the video #thisistomorrow with Washington DC based performers in response to the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner; and producing the science fiction film: The Invasion of the Hairy Blobs, currently edited at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, amongst others at: Museo Universitaro del Chopo, Mexico City, DCAC, Washington DC, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Glass Curtain Gallery, Threewalls, Gallery 400, 6018 North, and Elaine L. Jacob Gallery, Detroit, Printed Matter, New York, the Wexner Center, Columbus, and at the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, Kunst Fabrik, Munchen, and Bethanien Haus, Berlin. She has been rewarded grants from the Mondrian Foundation, The Propeller Fund, the department of Culturall Affairs, Chicago, the Dutch Art Foundation and multiple cultural grants from the Dutch Consulate in New York.

Ellen Mueller (West Virginia Wesleyan College)
Exhibiting works nationally and internationally, Ellen Mueller explores hyperactive news media and corporate management systems via work in a variety of media including, but not limited to, performance, 3D printing, and drawing. Recent residencies include Ox-Bow, Virginia Center for Creative Art where she was a Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation Creative Fellow, Nes Artist Residency (Iceland), Coast Time (May 2016), and Signal Culture (August 2016). Mueller currently lives and works in Buckhannon WV as an Assistant Professor of Art at West Virginia Wesleyan College. She received her MFA in Studio Art from University of South Florida. She completed a BA in Theatre and Art, and a BS in Design Technology from Bemidji State University. Additionally, she has obtained performance training at Dell'Arte International and the Brave New Institute (now known as the Brave New Workshop Student Union). Mueller is contracted with Oxford University Press to publish a foundational art textbook entitled "Elements and Principles of 4D Art and Design", due out February 2016.

Heather Warren-Crow (Texas Tech University)
Heather Warren-Crow, assistant professor of interdisciplinary arts and affiliated faculty in women's studies, is a scholar of media and performance as well as an artist. Her interdisciplinary scholarship centers on the aesthetics of subjectivity in the 19th-21st centuries. She has given sustained attention to the body in analog and digital animation, discourses of adolescence in fine art and popular media, the art of affective labor, and the agency of objects, images, and sounds. Dr. Warren-Crow's first book, Girlhood and the Plastic Image, was recently published by Dartmouth College Press. Dr. Warren-Crow's teaching interests span music, theatre, dance, film, and visual art. She has areas of expertise in intermedia (especially performance art, sound art, and screendance); puppetry, movement-based, and multimedia performance; theatrical design; video and internet art; photography theory; performance studies; cinema and media studies; girlhood studies; gender studies; and vocal aesthetics.

Jorge Rojas (Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City)
Born in Morelos, Mexico, Jorge Rojas is a multidisciplinary artist, curator, and art educator. He studied Art at the University of Utah and at Bellas Artes in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. His work and curatorial projects have been exhibited across the US and internationally, including Museo del Barrio, Queens Museum of Art, White Box, and Grace Exhibition Space in New York; Museum of Latin American Art, The Mexican Museum, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, and MACLA in California; Project Row Houses and New World Museum in Houston; Diaspora Vibe Gallery in Miami; Utah Museum of Fine Arts and Utah Museum of Contemporary Art in Salt Lake City; Ex Convento del Carmen in Guadalajara; and FOFA Gallery in Montreal. He has received grants and fellowships from National Performance Network, Experimental Television Center, and Vermont Studio Center. He is the Founding Director of Low Lives, an international, multi-venue live streaming performance festival that was founded in 2009. Rojas is director of education and engagement at the UMFA in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Angela Washko (Carnegie Mellon University)
Angela Washko is an artist, writer and facilitator devoted to creating new forums for discussions of feminism in the spaces most hostile toward it. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Since 2012, Washko has operated as The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft - an ongoing intervention on communal language formation inside the most popular massively multi-player online role playing game of all time. A recent recipient of The Frank-Ratchye Fund for Art at the Frontier Grant from the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, a Franklin Furnace Performance Fund Grant, a Creative Time Report commission, a Rhizome Internet Art Microgrant, a Danish International Visiting Artist Grant and the Terminal Award, Washko’s practice has been highlighted in Art in America, Frieze Magazine, Time Magazine, The Guardian (UK), ArtForum, ARTnews, VICE, Hyperallergic, Rhizome, the New York Times, The Creator’s Project, Dazed and Confused Magazine, Digicult, ArtInfo, Bad At Sports and more. Her projects have been presented nationally and internationally at venues including Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art (Helsinki, Finland), Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, Moving Image Art Fair (London and NYC), the Rotterdam International Film Festival, Institute for Contemporary Art Boston and Bitforms Gallery in NYC. Washko’s work is featured in the recently published book “Mass Effect: Art and the Internet in the 21st Century” from The New Museum and MIT Press.

Looking forward::: DECEMBER 2015 ARRAYLIST THEME: GAMES! –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

ARRAY [ ] // www.arrayproject.com

We are happy to announce the upcoming ArrayList discussion theme: New Media Foundations: Games! --> starts December 1, 2015

DECEMBER 2015 GUEST THREAD LEADERS::::

Theresa Devine (New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University; Phoenix)
Theresa Devine is an Assistant Professor in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. Theresa received her BFA in Painting and Printmaking at Texas A & M University - Corpus Christi in 1991 and her MFA in Painting at University of Houston in 1994. In her personal artwork she explores the intersection of adversity and play in the media of toys and games. http://theresadevine.com/ As Director of the Studio 4 Gaming Innovation research lab, Theresa focuses on researching games to redefine and explore what they can be and how they can be used to initiate transformation in our society. http://studio4gaminginnovation.com/

j.duran (Public High School Teacher/Private Post Secondary Instructor; Chicago)
j.duran is an artist and pedagogue who creates Rube Goldberg machines out of voltage differences. His process centers in the tension created through simultaneous reduction and abstraction that often manifests itself in creating code. He was granted an MFA in New Media in 2009 after earning a BS in Computer Science in 2001. duran has taught courses in Data Visualization, Interactive Art, and Systems at a public university in Chicago. Currently, j.duran is a Computer Science Teacher and the CTE Chair at a public high school where he teaches classes in games, new media, and computer science. In addition, he also teaches Experimental Games at a private post-secondary institution in Chicago.

Patrick Jagoda (University of Chicago; Chicago)
Patrick Jagoda is an Assistant Professor of English and an affiliate of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago. He specializes in media studies, twentieth and twenty-first century American literature, and digital game theory and design. Alongside this position, he is the co-founder of the Game Changer Chicago Design Lab and serves as a co-editor of the interdisciplinary journal Critical Inquiry. Jagoda is a published author with research and teaching expertise in: New Media; 20th and 21st Century American Fiction, Film, and Television; Critical Theory; American Cultural Studies; Game Studies; Science Studies; and Game Design. He co-edited two special issues: New Media and American Literature for American Literature (2013) and Comics & Media: A Special Issue of Critical Inquiry (2014). Two of his books will be published in 2016: Network Aesthetics, and The Game Worlds of Jason Rohrer (co-authored). Jagoda completed his PhD in the Department of English at Duke University in 2010, along with a graduate certificate in Information Science and Information Studies. http://www.patrickjagoda.com, https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/gamechanger/about/

Alex Myers (Creighton University; Omaha)
My research interests are far ranging and include games, architecture, violence, fear, mysticism, ambiguity, perception, movement, nature, extinction, death, and loss. I'd say that I'm interested in systems, but I think everything human is built upon systems. It's how we think. My methods and materials change to fit the needs of the project, but I spend a lot of time working in 3D environments like Blender and Unity. I have exhibited at NP3 in Groningen, Nikolaj Kunsthallen in Copenhagen, Lab for Electronic Art and Performance, Berlin, Interaccess in Toronto, FACT in Liverpool, and LACDA in Los Angeles, among others. I've twice been awards the Art and Culture Prize of Groningen, The Netherlands. Several years ago I received my MFA(Hons) in Interactive Media & Environments at The Frank Mohr Instituut of the Hanze University of Applied Science in Groningen, The Netherlands. In addition to making all sorts of weird stuff, I am an Assistant Professor of Design at Creighton University in Omaha, NE. I also occasionally mentor at the Kent Bellows Studio and Center for Visual Arts and give talks and workshops about Art Games, Interaction Design, and New Media Art.

Phoenix Perry (Goldsmiths, Founder Code Liberation Foundation, Co-Founder Dozen Eyes; London/NYC)
Phoenix Perry is an experienced developer, accidental public figure and general rebel rabble rouser. She's currently a lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London where she teaches physical computing and games. She builds emergent play environments that encourage group dynamics while engaging in the subtle art of suggesting games can address larger concerns in society. Her research attempts to extend the human senses through augmenting the perception of emotion. As a card carrying member of the gaming feminist killjoy party, she engages in regular acts of mild civil disobedience. You can find her in hacklabs burning herself on soldering irons or coffee shops caffeinating while punching code in chemically induced fits of brilliance before napping. Additionally, she's the property of a grey Egyptian Mau. All appearances and engagements are by the cat's permission only. http://phoenixperry.com, https://github.com/phoenixperry

Scott Richmond (Wayne State University; Detroit)
Scott C. Richmond is Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of English at Wayne State University, where his teaching and research focus on avant-garde cinema and experimental media, film theory and media theory, and phenomenology and critical theory. His work has appeared, among other places, in World Picture, Discourse, and the Journal of Visual Culture. He is co-editor, with Elizabeth Reich, of a special issue of Film Criticism entitled "New Approaches to Cinematic Identification." His first book, Cinema's Bodily Illusions: Flying, Floating, and Hallucinating, is forthcoming in fall 2016 from the University of Minnesota Press. On games and gaming, Scott has published an essay on boredom and gaming, “Vulgar Boredom: What Andy Warhol Can Teach Us about Candy Crush” (in JVC), and has presented widely on first-person gaming. He also regularly teaches both with and about games in humanities classes, especially low-fi, text-based, indie, experimental, and avant-garde games. In these classes, students work with games across many modalities, including analysis, research, theory, design, and making.

Brian Schrank (DePaul University; Chicago)
Brian Schrank is an artist and assistant professor at DePaul University in Chicago who develops games on experimental platforms such as puppets, installations, AR, and VR. His book "Avant-garde Videogames: Playing with Technoculture" places games within the context of art history and the avant-garde. His controversial game "Pedandeck" challenges conventions by prompting people to play the Grammar Nazi or Race Card in their everyday lives. He earned his Ph.D. in digital media and videogames from Georgia Tech. http://www.brianschrank.com


Arraylist series details here: http://arrayproject.com/content/discussion Subscribe here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist The purpose of ArrayList is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). Subscribe to the listserv so that you can read [fly-on-the-wall is a-ok AKA lurking] and/or respond to the written activity, and read the archives. We hope to engage a wide range of critical perspectives so please chime in with thoughts and questions. Sincerely, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY[ ] founders

 

Upcoming Deadlines and Announcements

Just getting a few reminders in the pipeline for you!

Our posted announcements with November Deadlines are tagged on our site here.

In particular, the Media-N Journal has a call out for proposals for the Spring 2016 issue. More info in this post, and upcoming on the Media-N Journal website.

At Bard there is going to be a talk on film preservation:

Thursday, November 5
Paik on Film: Discovering, Archiving, and Preserving Fluxus

Lori Zippay, Electronic Arts Intermix Executive Director

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm 

$15.00 General Admission 
FREE for students with valid ID
Bard Graduate Center
38 West 86 Street
Register: 212.501.3011programs@bgc.bard.edu

Lori Zippay, Electronic Arts Intermix Executive Director, talks on film preservation in relation to moving image works. She introduces a selection of films, including Button Happening, Digital Experiment at Bell Labs, Vide-Film Concert, and Rare Performance Documents, from the EAI collection For more information and to register click here.  [http://www.bgc.bard.edu/news/events/paik-on-film.html

 

IEEE VIS Art Exhibition VISAP’15

Data Improvisations
VISAP’15, the IEEE VIS Arts Program Exhibition

Exhibition - October 19 – 30
Opening – October 27, 7-9 pm
LeRoy Neiman Center, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
37 S Wabash Ave.
Chicago, Illinois

http://visap.uic.edu/2015/

Please join us for the Art Exhibition Opening on October 27th 7-9pm
at the LeRoy Neiman Gallery, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 37 S. Wabash St. The Exhibition is free and open to the public.

Data Improvisations showcases projects at the intersection of new media arts and data visualization. Twelve featured artists explore new ways of perceiving and interacting with complex data and examine the accelerating quantification of contemporary life.

Featured artists: Donna Cox, Eduardo Kac, Daniel Sandin, Jo Wood, Rebecca Ruige Xu & Sean Hongsheng Zhai, Emilio Vavarella, Benedikt Gross & Joey Lee, Scott Kildall, Ben Ridgway, Kevin Badni, Haru Ji & Graham Wakefield, and Charlie Roberts.

Data Improvisations is organized by Angus Forbes, Daria Tsoupikova, and Fanny Chevalier, with support from IEEE VIS 2015, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Shapiro Center for Research and Collaboration.

Other Art events during the exhibition include the art panel, art paper presentations, performances and artist talks. The full schedule of the events is available on the VISAP'15 website: http://visap.uic.edu/2015/schedule.html

http://visap.uic.edu

http://ieeevis.org


 

The IEEE VIS 2015 Arts Program, or VISAP'15, showcases innovative artwork and research that explores the exciting and increasingly prominent intersections between art and visualization. Through a dedicated papers track and an exhibition that run concurrently with the IEEE 2015 VIS conference, the Arts Program aims to foster new thinking, discussion, and collaboration between artists, designers, technologists, visualization scientists, and others working at the intersection of these fields.

Stimulus Response Affect: New Media Art in the Greater Lakes Region – prologue

SRA_FullColor Version_outlines-2

We are delighted to announce the opening of the exhibition Stimulus Response Affect, which explores varied ways artists engage the human body through sensorial, perceptual, chronological and spatial shifts, using sound and kinetic sculpture, interactive video, participatory games, augmented reality, social media and programmed software.

The Oakland University Art Gallery is hosting this event, co-curated by Colleen Ludwig and Vagner M. Whitehead. From October 16, 2015 to November 22, 2015, eleven works by fourteen artists from around the Great Lakes, in the U.S. and Canada.

These dynamic artworks activate the viewer as a participant, raising questions about self, relationships, surroundings and society, and provide the unique opportunity to experience and actively (re)consider the relevance and implications of innovative interactive contemporary art. With this in mind, we also invite you to attend a special symposium in conjunction with the exhibition the day after the opening.

The exhibition opens on October 16, from 6 to 8 pm.

On October 17, from 9 to 5 pm, featured artists will engage with the public in a four session symposium.

Play, Response and Learning

- Cristobal Mendoza and Annica Cuppetelli

- Bradley Tober

- Brian Patrick Franklin and Chris Wille

Text, Error Message, Codification, Reverb

- Sophia Brueckner

- Andrea Roberts

- Meg Mitchell

Malleable Architecture, Space and Time

- Brian Schrank

- Aaron Higgins

Augmented Reality, Conflict and Participation

- Channel TWo (Adam Trowbridge and Jessica Westbrook)

- Byron Rich and John Wenskovitch

- Ben Grosser (via Skype)

The SRA symposium will be live-streamed at the Hub in an upcoming post; we invite you to return and participate from afar.

After_the_Gods_screenshot_03

Exhibition Announcement – Revisions—Zen for Film

Revisions—Zen for Film
On view September 18, 2015–January 10, 2016

How do works of art endure over time in the face of aging materials and changing interpretations of their meaning? How do decay, technological obsolescence, and the blending of old and new media affect what an artwork is and can become? And how can changeable artworks encourage us to rethink our assumptions of a work of art as fixed and static? Revisions—Zen for Film, an exhibition on view in Bard Graduate Center’s Focus Gallery from September 18, 2015 through January 10, 2016 explores these questions through Zen for Film (1962-64), one of the most evocative films created by the Korean-American artist Nam June Paik (1932–2006).

The exhibition was curated by Hanna Hölling, Andrew W. Mellon Visiting Professor, Cultures of Conservation, at Bard Graduate Center.

Bard Graduate Center Gallery
18 West 86 Street,
New York, NY 10024


Bard Graduate Center is a graduate research institute in New York City. Our gallery exhibitions and publications, MA and PhD programs, and research initiatives explore new ways of thinking about decorative arts, design history, and material culture. Founded in 1993, we are an academic unit of Bard College.

Hub – The New Media Caucus Blog

Hub - the New Media Caucus blogHello World!

A hub is a point of convergence - for networks, devices, physical or virtual objects, and for people. It is our goal to use this space to bring together, and to distribute.

 The New Media Caucus has been working behind the scenes to create a space on our website for members to share content - through a new blog we are calling: Hub ! Over the next several months we will begin to roll out this portion of our website - see you back here soon!

JULY 2015 THEME: CODE on ARRAYLIST LISTSERV –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

Announcing the upcoming July 2015 ArrayList discussion theme: New Media Foundations: Code!

Sign up/join in here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist

The purpose of ArrayList is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). Thanks, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, and Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY founders

JULY 2015 GUEST THREAD LEADERS

Ubi de Feo:
very curious person, creative technologist
"I was born in 1974 and I believe I belong to one of the most lucky, unique generations ever lived: I am part of a demographic which grew up without Internet, slowly saw it appearing on computer screens, and gradually transitioned into a world where the net is now in our pockets, on our wrists, in our fridge and many more connected devices. I started taking stuff apart when I was 6, and this desire to discover the inner workings of objects has guided me my whole life through hacking computers, engines, code and electronics. Armed with this curiosity I became interested in many aspects of computing and technology, as well as many things technical. ... I currently teach programming, electronics and other things to whoever wants to learn, often developing my own methods to explain really complicated things in a more tangible, down-to-earth fashion. I do not try to teach things I don't thoroughly understand, which often leads me to learn completely new subjects in order to be able to explain them to myself and others. In my off-time, when I shower or do the dishes, I think about ways to improve things or invent new ones. I began experimenting with mobile devices in 2001, and internet connected objects in 2007." more: http://ubidefeo.com, https://github.com/ubidefeo

Evelyn Eastmond:
Viewpoints Research Institute, Digital+Media, RISD
Evelyn Eastmond is an artist and software researcher. She received her BS and MEng degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT and an MFA in Digital + Media from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2003, she joined the Lifelong Kindergarten Group's Scratch project at the MIT Media Lab, where she worked for seven years as a software engineer, user experience designer, and workshop facilitator. Before leaving MIT for RISD in 2010, she developed DesignBlocks, a spinoff of Scratch focused on interactive computer graphics. At RISD, Evelyn became interested in the languages of traditional painting and drawing and their loose relation to the languages of computing. Evelyn is currently interested in the role of computation in contemporary arts, media and culture and in how the design of programming languages and learning environments affects the stories people can tell with them. She recently completed a residency at the Gushul Studio in Alberta, Canada. She has shown work in Providence and Boston, and has lectured and taught new media workshops and courses internationally. more info: https://github.com/evhan55

Ira Greenberg:
Director, Center of Creative Computation and Professor, Computer Science and Engineering Southern Methodist University
With an eclectic background combining studio arts and computer science, Ira Greenberg has been a painter, 2D and 3D animator, print designer, web and interactive designer/developer, programmer, art director, creative director, managing director, art and computer science professor and author. He wrote the first major language reference on the Processing programming language, Processing: Creative Coding and Computational Art, (Berkeley, CA: friends of ED, 2007). Greenberg holds a B.F.A. from Cornell University and an M.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. Greenberg’s research and teaching interests include aesthetics and computation, expressive programming, emergent forms, net-based art, artificial intelligence (and stupidity), physical computing and computer art pedagogy (and anything else that tickles his fancy). He is currently building a new 3D Graphics Library, called Protobyte, for developing artificial life forms. more info: http://iragreenberg.com, https://www.smu.edu/Meadows/AreasOfStudy/CreativeComputation/Faculty/GreenbergIra

Rebecca Miller-Webster
Software Engineer and Managing Director thoughtbot Chicago, Write+Speak+code Conference Organizer, Educator
Rebecca Miller-Webster is a software engineer, conference organizer, and teacher. She is the founder of Write/Speak/Code and Managing Director for thoughtbot Chicago. Rebecca has been developing software professionally for over 10 years and previously organized GORUCO. She was the founding teacher at Dev Bootcamp NYC and has taught hundreds of students software development as well as led workshops on public speaking, leadership, and oppression. Rebecca holds an Masters in Computer Science and a BA in Women and Gender Studies from Washington University in St. Louis and was named one of 7 Brilliant Women in Tech by Craig Nemark, founder of Craigslist. She loves cupcakes, sea mammals, and prosecco. Rebecca lives in Oak Park, IL with her husband, black pug, and rescued havenese. And she changes her hair. A lot. more: http://www.rebeccamiller-webster.com, https://github.com/rmw

Daniel Shiffman:
Assistant Arts Professor, Interactive Telecommunications Program, NYU Tisch School of the Arts
Daniel Shiffman works as an Associate Arts Professor at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. Originally from Baltimore, Daniel received a BA in Mathematics and Philosophy from Yale University and a Master's Degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Program. He works on developing tutorials, examples, and libraries for Processing, the open source programming language and environment created by Casey Reas and Ben Fry. He is the author of Learning Processing: A Beginner's Guide to Programming Images, Animation, and Interaction and The Nature of Code (self-published via Kickstarter), an open source book about simulating natural phenomenon in Processing. more: http://shiffman.net

 

CURRENTS 2015: 6th Santa Fe International New Media Festival

CURRENTS brings together New Media artists in an atmosphere that fosters open exchange and professional networking. CURRENTS serves as a platform for artistic experimentation and generates exploration into all forms of new media art, while providing the public with an opportunity to experience an outstanding selection of innovative work. Committed to making this extraordinary work available to everyone, the CURRENTS Festivals are free to the public.

Friday, June 12 through Sunday, June 28 (closed Mondays and Tuesdays) 2015


Parallel Studios ( a 501(c)(3) non-profit ) has been producing, curating and designing small and large scale currents video exhibitions in Santa Fe since 2002. In 2010 we launched CURRENTS: Santa Fe International New Media Festival as an annual, citywide event. The Festival brings together the work of established, unrecognized and emerging New Media artists, from New Mexico, the US and the world, for events showcasing interactive and fine art video installations, multimedia performances, single channel video, animation, digital dome programs, experimental documentary,web based/app art forms, architectural mapping, the oculus rift, robotics and 3D printing. Parallel Studios reaches out to local high and middle school students through its Youth Media Makers Program. All events and programs are free.

 

 

UCSC’s DANM 2015 MFA Exhibition “NEW ALCHEMY”

April 23 - 26 (12-5)
Reception: Saturday April 25 (5-8pm)
Digital Arts Research Center (DARC), UCSC
 
In the Digital Arts and New Media MFA Program (DANM) at UC Santa Cruz, two years of intensive study culminate in the development of individual projects, which premiere in an annual MFA exhibition. In honor of the golden anniversary of UC Santa Cruz and the tenth anniversary of the DANM program, twelve emerging artists have come together to present New Alchemy, a group exhibition exploring various processes of transformation through interactive, digital, mixed-media, and performative work. danm.ucsc.edu/mfa15
 
The exhibition is the centerpiece of a day-long festival celebrating DANM’s first decade, on April 25, 2015. This free event includes outdoor exhibits and interactive demos, the annual DANM MFA art exhibition, alumni slideshows, research lab open houses, and a masquerade ball. It’s a day of DIY making, projection mapping, repurposed military vehicles, free food, fine art, vacuform masks, kids crafts and more – It's pan-DANM-onium!