Tag Archives: exhibition

Call for Entries: The Light Factory 9th Annuale

The Light Factory is pleased to announce its 9th Juried Annuale, a photography competition that will showcase challenging and inventive new work from photographers and artists throughout the international photographic community. From traditional to digital, still and moving, all photographic techniques and approaches are welcome. This can include works that stretch the boundaries of the assumed definitions of photographic-based media. The exhibition will consist of 4-6 photographers, each of whom will be represented by 5-7 images [size permitting].

EXHIBITION DATES Thursday, April 20 – Friday, June 2, 2017
OPENING RECEPTION Thursday, April 20, 2017 / 6:30 – 8:30 PM

ENTRY DEADLINE Friday, February 24, 2017
WINNING ENTRIES DUE TO THE LIGHT FACTORY April 3 – 7, 2017

JUROR
Rick Wester
Rick Wester Fine Art, New York City, NY

ELIGIBILITY
The Light Factory 9th Juried Annuale is open to everyone. Entrants must enter only 5–7 images from a specific series or body of work, however, artists may submit up to two different applications. If you submit an installation, it should include only 5–7 images. Please include a short statement (no more than 150 words) about the work along with a current resume or curriculum vitae.

MEDIA
From traditional to digital, still and moving, all photographic techniques and approaches are welcome. This can include works that stretch the boundaries of the assumed definitions of photography-based media.

ENTRY FEE
$35 non-refundable entry fee per series of 5-7 images. Artists may submit up to two applications.

The Light Factory is a community-based center for photography and film located in Charlotte, NC. The Light Factory is dedicated to enriching lives and transforming communities through thought provoking exhibitions, world-class education and vibrant community engagement. Throughout its 43 years of continuous operation, The Light Factory has featured artists such as Sally Mann, Ansel Adams, Tina Barney, Debbie Luster, Pinky/MM Bass, Keith Carter, Annie Leibovitz, Ralph Gibson, Susan Kae Grant, Edward Weston, Jerry Uelsmann, Richard Renaldi, Bill Viola, Andres Serrano, Mary Ellen Mark, and many more.

Terminal 1.0

My curiosity began with an animated, vintage flashing square cursor next to the title Terminal 1.0. Terminal is an installation project at Western Front in Vancouver, Canada. The installation project examines single-user interfaces, along with how technology influences the adaptation of new artistic forms. My mini blog series will follow the four-part installation project through 2017.

Media Curator, Allison Collins has curated the project so that it occupies two available spaces, one physical and one virtual. In our email exchange Collins described the physical location, “The on-site element of the project repurposes an under-used space in the Western Front building, to deliberately offer an alternative to installing a computer into a traditional exhibition space. It allows for a single user to access an intimate experience of a work created to take place on a machine.”

bp Nichol, First Screening, 1984 Photo credit : Ben Wilson

bp Nichol, First Screening, 1984 Photo credit : Ben Wilson

I asked Collins about her specific curation methods for Terminal. She stated, “The methodology was one of pairing and contrasting the possibilities for accurately conveying artworks within those two spaces.” With these methods she considered what the project addressed, which was the user-experience of the computer. What brought together these two different spaces were both the experience of artists who utilize computers to create and the viewers of the computer-based artist works. This is how her curation methodology necessitates thinking about the virtual and physical spaces as separate experiences.

Collins has navigated the different spaces to inquire with an audience for viewing a specific work on-site and other work online. Since she curated the project in Vancouver and I reside on the East Coast of the United States, my text will present the single-user experience from online viewing. The first installation is entitled Terminal 1.0 Programmed Poetry. It considers language within the broader investigations of the overall installation project. The artist and two poets presented on the webpage utilize text, while the written format was modified from a specific technological time-period. This not only demonstrates the experimental process from the 1960’s era to now, but also offers insight to how artists and poets from the Vancouver area had a role in influencing theses specific processes.

From my singular interface experience, I immediately noticed how the curation of the digital content runs parallel with the context of the selected work. The acts of composing text, distributing and reinterpreting language can be distinguished within the curation process. I have observed this by the multimedia choices of text, audio and video. These multimedia elements refer back to Collins’ curatorial selections, made specifically for the virtual space.

terminal1_screenshot

Screen Shot of Terminal 1.0 Programmed Poetry on Western Front website October 2016

Collins’ text, Media Poetics: The Cut, The Context and The Cute, offers the viewer an opportunity to have a detailed insight that reaches beyond the technical elements of a computer-based work. The inclusion of social and cultural aspects of the artist creative process offers a broader depiction to the progression with technology, along with the impact the medium had for contemporary experimentation. The text depicts this with the work of each poet and artist.

Programmed Poetry regards the human element from the creative process with technology. In 1966 Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) was formed and was based in New York City. The first large project that E.A.T. is known for is Nine Evenings. The electrical engineer at the forefront of the movement E.A.T., Billy Kluver acknowledges, from a 1995 interview with Garnet Hertz, that from his experience with E.A.T. he recognized that involvement of artists with technology has introduced a more humanizing element with the collaborative projects. Kluver’s assessment is derived from his matching of artist’s projects with knowledge from engineers. Part of his evaluation suggests that the artists brought situations to the standards of technology that were not in an engineer’s everyday routine concerning rational problems. Kluver believes the questions raised by artists concerning the use of technology brought the engineers and the technology from that time-period closer to humanity.

Programmed Poetry examines single-user interfaces from poets and artists and their own technological knowledge rather than a specific collaboration between artist and engineer. Poet, bpNichol transformed language and the viewer’s engagement with basic code. In the early 1980’s, a period of technological evolution where computers became affordable and portable, the Apple IIe was accessible on a consumer scale. bpNichol utilized the Apple BASIC programming language to animate, communicate and distribute his twelve kinetic poems, First Screening. He extends the context of code by embedding the virtual accessibility of two of the twelve poems on a 5.25 inch floppy disc that was in an edition of 100. The viewer would have needed to be code savvy to activate the text-based digital animation with the BASIC command (RUN 1748-). Reading Collins’ text reveals the human element of bpNichol’s creative process with code, which was by placing puns and language tricks to play on the commands of the program for the curious viewer. She does acknowledge bpNichol’s perspective of handling code as a space for the invitation of user interaction.

Crossing disciplinary boundaries in the 21st Century is artist and poet Tiziana La Melia. Viewing the Eyelash and the Monochrome images on the webpage, I relate back to the concept of “the cut” with the direct collage composition of each print. The two spaces La Melia is inquiring with are from the software of Word’s virtual page and the visual art space of the image plane. The Eyelash and the Monochrome image titles that begin with (Spread 1) (Spread 2) persuade my thinking of how many variations there could be of these prints. Collins’ text and the image titles inform me that La Melia’s working progress has direct links to the computer. It comes from the input of composing text and output of printed objects. In a broader context, La Melia’s project resonates with the current single-user interface by creating the unlimited ability to reinterpret content and the various transmission methods.

screenshotterminal_lemelia

Screen Shot from Terminal 1.0 Programmed Poetry of Tiziana La Melia, The Eyelash and the Monochrome on Western Front website October 2016

My intimate viewing via the Internet had the curation structure and multimedia elements aiding in my interpretation of the time-periods and specific works. The obvious limit is being absent from the physical object or moment of experiencing the physical site of Terminal 1.0. Even though I haven’t physically seen bpNichol’s First Screening run on an Apple IIe, or stood in front of Tiziana La Melia prints, I was able to mentally engage with the physical aspects of these works by invitation of Collins’ text. I do not see that I am completely missing out on the physical site, because Programmed Poetry occupies two available spaces and I experienced the work in the virtual space. The virtual space, similar to the context of the works and the curation of Programmed Poetry, has transformed the language of experiencing installation projects.

 

REFERENCES

Collins, A. (2016) Media Poetics: The Cut, The Context and The Cute [Internet], Vancouver, Canada. Available from: http://terminal.front.bc.ca/ [Accessed September 10, 2016].

Hertz, G. (1995) The Godfather of Technology and Art: An interview with Billy Kluver [Internet], Vancouver, Canada. Available from: http://www.conceptlab.com/interviews/kluver.html [Accessed July 10, 2013].

By: Carrie Ida Edinger

Carrie’s interest with new media is in interdisciplinary methods and the use of the Internet as a presentation site for evolving contemporary projects.

The Body Electric – an Invitational Exhibition at UW Whitewater

Installation View, The Body Electric

Installation View, The Body Electric

Over the past several years I have been managing the University of Wisconsin - Whitewater Motion Capture Studio. Our space is relatively small and we use a markerless system manufactured by Organic Motion. I was drawn to the use of MOCAP in animation because it offered a different way to make things move on the screen in relation to human movement. As I learned more about what MOCAP data looks like, I started to see potential for its use beyond conventional approaches that create figurative remediated versions of captured movements. This lead me to begin using samples from our studio to animate things like cloth simulations or typographic characters.

I began formalizing some of these interests through research and then started to write about my experiences. I noticed more instances of artists and musicians working with movement data in creative and expressive directions. Along with two of my colleagues at UWW, Jeff Herriott  and Nick Hwang, I put together an invitational exhibition and music performance event at the Crossman Gallery on our campus. The show, "The Body Electric", opened on October 13 and will run until November 12 with the performances occurring in the evening of October 20.

Anna Weisling, 3D prints from MOCAP

Anna Weisling, 3D prints from MOCAP

Giselle Zatonyl "Experimental Life Institute of Kepler 45 ( station 7, test 3)"

Giselle Zatonyl "Experimental Life Institute of Kepler 45 ( station 7, test 3)"

The poem “I Sing The Body Electric”, written by Walt Whitman and published in 1885, addresses a body and soul entwined. The body is electrified through various interactions that may be both explicit and implicit. These and other themes from Whitman’s poem can be extended to our contemporary culture where the ubiquity of digital technologies is evolving to extend our bodies. Artists from wide ranging fields of experience and creative practice regularly explore the relationships between the body and its multi-faceted involvement with digitized emergence. This invitational exhibition explores some of the threads where art, technology, interactivity, music, performance, and movement cross over in 'singing the body electric'. It also investigates some of the latest technological works emerging from the studios of artists using new media and time based technologies.

Paul Hertz, prints generated through custom designed boids flocking software

Paul Hertz, prints generated through custom designed boids flocking software

Featured Artists Include: #Additivism (Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke), Jeremy Behreandt, Christopher Burns, Dylan Bernard, Maria Gillespie, Nathaniel Stern, Jeff Herriott, Paul Hertz, Nick Hwang, Dale Kaminski, Justin Lincoln, A. Bill Miller, Alex Myers, Nicholas O’Brien, Anna Weisling, Connor Yass and Giselle Zatonyl.

A. Bill Miller, "untitled (fursuit04)" animation

A. Bill Miller, "untitled (fursuit04)"

Dylan Bernard, Maria Gillespie, and Nathaniel Stern "movement, meaning, gesture"

Dylan Bernard, Maria Gillespie, and Nathaniel Stern "movement, meaning, gesture"

Justin Lincoln "Quick Cut-up" from reel of 8 videos

Justin Lincoln "Quick Cut-up" from reel of 8 videos (Paul Hertz print grouping behind)

Nicholas O'Brien,

Nicholas O'Brien, prints generated from death sequence motion captures

Alex Myers "The Body That Produced Them"

Alex Myers "The Body That Produced Them"

#Additivism "The 3D Additivist Manfesto" (Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke)

#Additivism "The 3D Additivist Manfesto" (Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke)

Special thanks to Mike Flanagan of the Crossman Gallery and his staff for accommodating the show and allowing us the space to explore this work in the context of the gallery. Additional thanks to the New Media Caucus for the support and networking opportunities that help to make exhibitions like this possible.

 

Call : The Video Show – Video, Digital Media + Installation at Raritan Valley Community College

Exhibition - No Fee - Open to original work in Video, Video Installation, Motion Graphics, Interactive Installation, or any “New Media” work. Work originally created in both digital and analog formats are acceptable. Duration may not exceed 10 minutes per piece. There is no minimum duration.

Work in all Video Art styles will be considered, including shorts, experimental, poetic, narrative, abstract, documentary, music, and installation.

Download prospectus at www.raritanval.edu/videoshow

For more info + questions please contact videoshow@raritanval.edu

Travel Shorts a Moving Image Festival for SECAC 2016

TRAVEL SHORTS A Moving Image Festival
SECAC Conference 2016
Call For Work

Calling for video, animation, motion graphic works that in some way deals with the theme of travel. Works are to be no longer than 10 minutes and may include sound. The selected works for the festival will be exhibited during the SECAC Conference at the Armory Mezzanine Gallery, Virginia Tech and on the bus ride between Roanoke and Blacksburg, VA to attend the keynote address by Lynn Hershman Leeson, at the Moss Arts Center’s theater in Blacksburg on Oct 21, 2016.

HOW TO ENTER
Email a vimeo or youtube link to simpat@vt.edu using TRAVEL SHORTS as subject.
Submit entries prior to 11:59 PM EDT August 31, 2016
Entry is free
Up to three entries per person is permitted.
Late entries will not be reviewed.
On acceptance uncompressed files will be called for via WeTransfer (a free transfer service up to 2 GB)

ELIGIBILITY
Travel Shorts, A Moving Image Festival is open to all. However, membership to SECAC is required within 10 days of acceptance to the festival. For membership information, visit the Membership page on the SECAC website: secacart.org.

JUROR
Dr. Simone Paterson, Associate Professor of New Media and Chair of Undergraduate Studies in Creative Technologies at The School of Visual Arts, Virginia Tech.

SCHEDULE
Submission deadline August 31, 2016
Notification of acceptance Sep 18, 2016
Deadline for selected work via WeTransfer Sep 30, 2016

Travel Shorts, A Moving Image Festival
Armory Mezzanine Gallery, Virginia Tech, SECAC Conference October 19-22, 2016.
Bus ride between Roanoke and Blacksburg, VA Friday Oct 21, 2016.

 


SECAC 2016 - Roanoke, VA
The city of Roanoke, Virginia, Virginia Tech, and Hollins University are proud to host the 73rd annual SECAC meeting October 19-22, 2016. Kevin Concannon, Director of the School of Visual Arts and Professor, Art History, at Virginia Tech, serves a conference director.

Join us in the beautiful mountains of Southwest Virginia for SECAC 2016. Sessions will take place at the official conference hotel, the Hotel Roanoke & Conference Center. The Hotel Roanoke, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996, is located in the heart of vibrant downtown Roanoke within easy walking distance of the Taubman Museum of Art, The Harrison Museum of African American Culture, and the O Winston Link Museum, and many restaurants and bars.

Evening excursions to Virginia Tech and Hollins on Thursday and Friday evenings include the SECAC 2015 Artist's Fellowship exhibition opening, Juried Exhibition, and keynote speaker Lynn Hershman Leeson, who will be speaking in the Moss Arts Center’s spectacular Snohetta-designed theater on the Virginia Tech campus. The annual SECAC Awards luncheon will be held on Thursday.

CALL FOR ENTRIES | Materials: Hard + Soft International Contemporary Craft Competition & Exhibition

The Greater Denton Arts Council announces the opening of its 2017 Call for Entries for the 30th Annual Materials: Hard + Soft Contemporary Craft Exhibition. This exhibition celebrates the evolving field of contemporary craft and the innovation of artists who push the boundaries of their chosen media. Recognized as one of the premier craft exhibitions in the United States, this year we are thrilled to be partnering with the National Endowment for the Arts to expand this national exhibition to now include international artists. Approximately 70 works will be selected for exhibition by juror JoAnn Edwards, Executive Director of the Museum of Craft and Design in San Francisco, California. Of the works selected, Juror Awards in amounts of $1000, $750, $500, and $250 will be awarded.

Online submissions and prospectus available at dentonarts.com/materialshardandsoft

SUBMISSION DEADLINE | September 30, 2016

2017 EXHIBITION | February 4 – May 6, 2017 at the Patterson-Appleton Arts Center in Denton, Texas. Inquires may be directed to the Arts Council at (940) 382-2787 or exhibit@dentonarts.com


The mission of the Greater Denton Arts Council is to support, promote, and encourage the arts in the Greater Denton Area.

The Greater Denton Arts Council has served the Denton Community for 45 years. The Arts Council provides foundational support for Denton’s artists and community arts organizations and collaborates frequently with area universities, the Denton Independent School District, and the City of Denton. The Arts Council presents a full schedule of programs and exhibitions in its two flagship facilities in historic downtown Denton, the Patterson-Appleton Center Arts Center and the Campus Theatre.

ART NEWS FROM SIGGRAPH 2016

HIGHLY INTERACTIVE ART GALLERY PRESENTATION - 'DATA MATERIALITIES'

TO BE SPECIAL FEATURE AT SIGGRAPH 2016 IN ANAHEIM

CHICAGO, June 16, 2016—Highly interactive art exhibits from around the world will be a special feature during SIGGRAPH 2016, the world's leading annual interdisciplinary educational experience showcasing the latest in computer graphics and interactive techniques. With the tagline "Render the Possibilities," SIGGRAPH 2016 will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center, 24–28 July 2016.

This year's Art Gallery, assembled under the banner "Data Materialities," represents a unique collection of 10 highly interactive installations created from 2003–2016.

SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery Chair Jonah Brucker-Cohen said, "We have made a special effort to bring back large-scale, highly immersive displays for the Art Gallery. Our title, 'Data Materialities,' illustrates the fact that in 2016, we are all constantly surrounded by networks, information, and data. Whether these stimuli consist of electromagnetic frequencies or physical wired connections, networks are everywhere, consuming and permeating our offices, homes, schools, and public indoor and outdoor spaces. 'Data Materialities' exposes this plethora of data and transforms it to incarnations of tangibility that not only showcase their complexity, but also allow us to relate to them on a human scale. By injecting humor and kinetic energy to this year's exposition, the Art Gallery will make light of these data platforms and present them on a grand scale to reveal their ubiquity."

Artwork and artists for the SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery Chair are selected by the program chair and not by a jury. This year's Art Gallery will be open to attendees during the following dates and times:

Sun, 24 July | Noon – 5:30 pm
Mon, 25 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Tue, 26 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Wed, 27 July | 10 am – 5:30 pm
Thu, 28 July | 10 am – 1 pm

"Data Materialities" Art Gallery highlights include:

Submergence | Chris Bennewith, Liam Birtles, Oliver Brown, Gaz Bushell, and Anthony Rowe, Squidsoup
"Submergence" is a large, immersive, walkthrough experience that uses up to 8,064 individual points of suspended light to create feelings of presence and movement within physical space. This video from YouTube user Nick Hunter shows the installation at the Geneva Mapping Festival.

Pixelbots | Paul Beardsley, Disney Research Zürich
Disney Research Zürich created a new kind of display in which pixels, called "Pixelbots," are represented as small colorful mobile robots which create cartoon-like images or animations. Pixelbots can be seen on the Disney Research YouTube channel, where they present a "Story of the Universe" animation, including a fish, a dinosaur, and a human.

The Kinetic Story Teller | Tine Bech, Independent Artist
"The Kinetic Story Teller" installation investigates how art, technology, and playfulness can create new systems of communication by materializing data through kinetic interaction - and offer people new ways of connecting with each other in public spaces. Two beautiful swings light up and display people's social media messages on screens, encouraging participants to connect while they play.

Plinko Poetry | Peiqui Su and Deqing Sun, New York University
A playful, interactive installation, "Plinko Poetry" has its roots in both the famous TV game show "The Price Is Right" and experimental blackout poetry. Every player can be both a winner and a poet. Drawing source text from current @nytimes and @FoxNews tweets, players can absurdly re-contextualize news headlines that are often overloaded with meaning.

For more information on the SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery, please see: s2016.siggraph.org/content/art-gallery.

To register for SIGGRAPH 2016, visit s2016.siggraph.org/registration.

To follow conference news on social media, check us out on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube, Instagram, or the ACM SIGGRAPH blog.

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About SIGGRAPH 2016
The annual SIGGRAPH conference is a five-day interdisciplinary educational experience in the latest computer graphics and interactive techniques, including a three-day commercial exhibition that attracts hundreds of companies from around the world. The conference also hosts the international SIGGRAPH Computer Animation Festival, showcasing works from the world's most innovative and accomplished digital film and video creators. Juried and curated content includes outstanding achievements in time-based art, scientific visualization, visual effects, games, real-time graphics, virtual reality, and narrative shorts. SIGGRAPH 2016 will take place from 24-28 July 2016 in Anaheim, California. Visit the SIGGRAPH 2016 website or follow SIGGRAPH on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or Instagram for more detailed information.

About ACM
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, is the world's largest educational and scientific computing society, uniting educators, researchers, and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources, and address the field's challenges. ACM strengthens the computing profession's collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for lifelong learning, career development, and professional networking.

Media Contact:
Dan Harary
Public Relations Director
+1.310.859.1831
danharary@siggraph.org

Call: Cinema Reset: New Media Exhibition at the New Orleans Film Festival

NOFF is looking to bring new media installations and experimental media artworks to the 2016 New Orleans Film Festival with an emphasis on virtual reality, video art, 360 video, game art, light / projection mapping, interactivity, and outdoor media installations. For consideration, please provide: a written proposal describing your project (no more than 500 words); a list of equipment you are able to provide and any/all specific equipment or technical needs; ideal space requirements, including prospective lighting needs; and please also submit any video, photos, stills, or sketches of your proposed project. This work must not have been exhibited in New Orleans previously.

Cinema Reset is the experimental media / new media partner of the New Orleans Film Festival. Since 2012, Cinema Reset has worked to bring emerging media artworks to New Orleans, facilitate open community media art workshops, and champion creative voices working on the front lines of emerging art and storytelling forms.

IEEE VIS 2016 Arts Program – Call for Entries, Paper and Exhibition Tracks

The IEEE VIS 2016 Arts Program, or VISAP’16, showcases innovative artwork and research that explores the exciting and increasingly prominent intersections between art, design, and visualization. Through a dedicated papers track and an exhibition that runs concurrently with the IEEE VIS 2016 conference, the Arts Program aims to foster new thinking, discussion, and collaboration between artists, designers, technologists, visualization scientists, and others working at the intersection of these fields. The theme for the Call for Papers and Artworks this year is “Metamorphoses.” We are especially interested in projects and papers that explore the relationships between visualization research and arts and/or design practice, and that introduce creative visual techniques that emphasize transformative aspects of scientific or cultural exploration.

VISAP’16 runs for one week from October 23rd through October 28th during the IEEE VIS 2016 conference in Baltimore, Maryland. Both the artworks and the papers are selected through a rigorous peer review process. Submissions are evaluated on quality and relevance to the IEEE VIS community by a program committee made up of experts in visualization, media arts, and design. In 2015, the acceptance rate for artworks was 14.75% and the acceptance rate for papers was 25%; we expect it to be similarly competitive for the 2016 program.

Submissions to VISAP’16 are due on June 24th at 5pm PDT.

For more information, please visit the VISAP’16 website: http://visap.uic.edu/2016

IEEE VIS Art Exhibition VISAP’15

Data Improvisations
VISAP’15, the IEEE VIS Arts Program Exhibition

Exhibition - October 19 – 30
Opening – October 27, 7-9 pm
LeRoy Neiman Center, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
37 S Wabash Ave.
Chicago, Illinois

http://visap.uic.edu/2015/

Please join us for the Art Exhibition Opening on October 27th 7-9pm
at the LeRoy Neiman Gallery, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 37 S. Wabash St. The Exhibition is free and open to the public.

Data Improvisations showcases projects at the intersection of new media arts and data visualization. Twelve featured artists explore new ways of perceiving and interacting with complex data and examine the accelerating quantification of contemporary life.

Featured artists: Donna Cox, Eduardo Kac, Daniel Sandin, Jo Wood, Rebecca Ruige Xu & Sean Hongsheng Zhai, Emilio Vavarella, Benedikt Gross & Joey Lee, Scott Kildall, Ben Ridgway, Kevin Badni, Haru Ji & Graham Wakefield, and Charlie Roberts.

Data Improvisations is organized by Angus Forbes, Daria Tsoupikova, and Fanny Chevalier, with support from IEEE VIS 2015, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Shapiro Center for Research and Collaboration.

Other Art events during the exhibition include the art panel, art paper presentations, performances and artist talks. The full schedule of the events is available on the VISAP'15 website: http://visap.uic.edu/2015/schedule.html

http://visap.uic.edu

http://ieeevis.org


 

The IEEE VIS 2015 Arts Program, or VISAP'15, showcases innovative artwork and research that explores the exciting and increasingly prominent intersections between art and visualization. Through a dedicated papers track and an exhibition that run concurrently with the IEEE 2015 VIS conference, the Arts Program aims to foster new thinking, discussion, and collaboration between artists, designers, technologists, visualization scientists, and others working at the intersection of these fields.

Stimulus Response Affect: New Media Art in the Greater Lakes Region – prologue

SRA_FullColor Version_outlines-2

We are delighted to announce the opening of the exhibition Stimulus Response Affect, which explores varied ways artists engage the human body through sensorial, perceptual, chronological and spatial shifts, using sound and kinetic sculpture, interactive video, participatory games, augmented reality, social media and programmed software.

The Oakland University Art Gallery is hosting this event, co-curated by Colleen Ludwig and Vagner M. Whitehead. From October 16, 2015 to November 22, 2015, eleven works by fourteen artists from around the Great Lakes, in the U.S. and Canada.

These dynamic artworks activate the viewer as a participant, raising questions about self, relationships, surroundings and society, and provide the unique opportunity to experience and actively (re)consider the relevance and implications of innovative interactive contemporary art. With this in mind, we also invite you to attend a special symposium in conjunction with the exhibition the day after the opening.

The exhibition opens on October 16, from 6 to 8 pm.

On October 17, from 9 to 5 pm, featured artists will engage with the public in a four session symposium.

Play, Response and Learning

- Cristobal Mendoza and Annica Cuppetelli

- Bradley Tober

- Brian Patrick Franklin and Chris Wille

Text, Error Message, Codification, Reverb

- Sophia Brueckner

- Andrea Roberts

- Meg Mitchell

Malleable Architecture, Space and Time

- Brian Schrank

- Aaron Higgins

Augmented Reality, Conflict and Participation

- Channel TWo (Adam Trowbridge and Jessica Westbrook)

- Byron Rich and John Wenskovitch

- Ben Grosser (via Skype)

The SRA symposium will be live-streamed at the Hub in an upcoming post; we invite you to return and participate from afar.

After_the_Gods_screenshot_03

Lessons from Luftwerk’s Solarise: A Sea of All Colors

Solarise: A Sea of All Colors, is an exhibition of light and sculptural installations by the artist duo Luftwerk on view at the Garfield Conservatory in Chicago. This new project is ambitious in scale, extending Luftwerk’s application of digital and physical materials as they consider the environmental and social impact of their rapidly growing studio. On Tuesday September 29th 2015, Petra Bachmaier, co-founder of Luftwerk, spoke at Alfred University’s Nevins Auditorium about the installation and design of Solarise.

Seed of Light in Solarise: A Sea of All Colors, Garfield Conservatory, 2015, Luftwerk. From: http://luftwerk.net/projects/solarise-a-sea-of-all-colors/

In recent years, Luftwerk have worked across Alfred University’s School of Art and Design to accomplish collaborative and individual projects. Bachmaier is the current Theodore Randall International Chair in the Division of Sculptural and Dimensional Studies. Luftwerk’s Spectrum, a video projection map on a large digital print, is now on view at Alfred University’s Fosdick Nelson Art Gallery. Spectrum is part of Typology/Morphology, a group exhibition from the Institute for Electronic Arts (IEA) highlighting print works by 26 resident artists. In 2014-15, Luftwerk collaborated with D. Chase Angier on her performance installation, As The Air Moves Back From You, also presented at the Fosdick Nelson Gallery. Like many of Luftwerk’s previous projects, As The Air Moves Back From You required complex digital projection mapping of an architectural space.

As The Air Moves Back From You, D. Chase Angier, Setup, Photo by Yasmina Chavez

As The Air Moves Back From You, D. Chase Angier, Setup, 2014-15. Photo by Yasmina Chavez

Solarise sets in motion bespoke LED video displays and analog applications of transparency and light across five new installations works. Seed of Light is a circular chandelier that reflects droplets and rippling water onto the floor of Garfield’s Horticulture Hall. Florescence applies a floral pattern of red and blue translucent Perspex to the arched conservatory ceiling. Throughout the day, directional sunlight projects color and overlapping shapes onto the floor below. After dark, artificial light illuminates the room. The Beacon consists of a parallel series of LED’s magnetically adhered to Garfield’s front entry scaffolding. These display footage of plants blowing according to live data that reflects local Chicago wind speeds. Portal and Prismatic activate light and reflection through sculptural forms within the Garfield Conservatory building.

Luftwerk’s intent is to control the environmental impact of Solarise, which must remain installed and robust for a year-long exhibition period. Bachmaier stated that, “With video and light you can greatly transform a space without interrupting the building at all.”((Petra Bachmaier, Alfred University, Nevins Auditorium, September 29, 2015.)) Each installation in Solarise breaks down to modular parts that easily disengage with the architecture of the 1908 conservatory structure. The artworks that use LED’s or consume electricity are powered through solar cells. Throughout the installation period in the summer of 2015, Luftwerk built relationships with contractors who were hired from the neighborhood surrounding the conservatory. No one traveled more than a mile to install the piece on a given day. This not only employed local workers, but also curtailed the carbon emissions that would have resulted from longer commutes.

Florescence in Solarise: A Sea of All Colors, Garfield Conservatory, 2015, Luftwerk. From: http://luftwerk.net/projects/solarise-a-sea-of-all-colors/

Solarise: A Sea of All Colors serves as a useful case study for new media artists who want to work at an architectural scale. Luftwerk’s methods draw upon sculpture, projection, and light while activating visitor participation across a grand space. Their consideration of the environmental impact of the work will be beneficial throughout the duration of the exhibition. Luftwerk were savvy in their use of practical and aesthetic strategies that circumvent many of the issues that can arise with the use of high-powered projectors and computing systems. When other new media installations would require the repair of equipment or the replacement of bulbs, Solarise’s analogue luminescence will continue to glow.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: TRANSFORMERS: Code and Data-Driven Animation

TRANSFORMERS: Code and Data-Driven Animation

Computer programming is an often invisible force that effects many aspects of our contemporary lives. From how we gather our news, maintain our libraries, or navigate our built environment, code shapes the interfaces and information they connect to. Artists who work with these languages as material can critically excavate code and its effects.

We seek submissions of animation and video that are produced through the use and manipulation of code and/or data. This can include, but is not limited to Processing, data sets, motion capture, procedural animation, and other forms of digital processing. Submitted work may include screen recordings or documentation of interactive, browser based, or live visual performances. The selected works will be screened during CAA and will have an online presence through the New Media Caucus Vimeo Channel and website. This program is part of the New Media Caucus’ participation in the 2016 College Art Association (CAA) Conference.

Preference is given to videos that are five minutes and under.(If longer videos are selected we will request that the artist provides a shorter excerpt).

The program will be selected by a panel of video artists including:

Mat Rappaport - Artist, Columbia College Chicago and v1b3.com
Darren Douglas Floyd - Artist/Filmmaker
A. Bill Miller - Artist, The University of Wisconsin - Whitewater

CALENDAR

SUBMISSION DEADLINE
September 4, 2015

NOTIFICATION
November 15, 2015

SUBMISSION FORM LINK

http://bit.ly/transformersCAA

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

First Name
Last Name
Email
Web site
Vimeo link to submitted video
Mailing Address
Title of Piece
Year Created
Brief Description (250 words max)
Bio  (250 words max)

Exhibition Announcement – Revisions—Zen for Film

Revisions—Zen for Film
On view September 18, 2015–January 10, 2016

How do works of art endure over time in the face of aging materials and changing interpretations of their meaning? How do decay, technological obsolescence, and the blending of old and new media affect what an artwork is and can become? And how can changeable artworks encourage us to rethink our assumptions of a work of art as fixed and static? Revisions—Zen for Film, an exhibition on view in Bard Graduate Center’s Focus Gallery from September 18, 2015 through January 10, 2016 explores these questions through Zen for Film (1962-64), one of the most evocative films created by the Korean-American artist Nam June Paik (1932–2006).

The exhibition was curated by Hanna Hölling, Andrew W. Mellon Visiting Professor, Cultures of Conservation, at Bard Graduate Center.

Bard Graduate Center Gallery
18 West 86 Street,
New York, NY 10024


Bard Graduate Center is a graduate research institute in New York City. Our gallery exhibitions and publications, MA and PhD programs, and research initiatives explore new ways of thinking about decorative arts, design history, and material culture. Founded in 1993, we are an academic unit of Bard College.

Call for Entries : MADATAC 07

Screen Shot 2015-06-04 at 5.52.55 PM

VIDEOART & NEW MEDIA AUDIO-VISUAL ART OPEN CALLS
Spain and International/ It is left open without restrictions a call to select, by means of a criteria in which will be valued particularly the experimentation, the innovation and the risk, the creations of all those audio-visual artists who wish that their works are part of the MADATAC/TRANSMADATAC project.

More information on the MADATAC websitehttp://madatac.es/en/madatac-07-call_2015/

The 7th edition will give a free approach to the concept:

ART FOR A QUANTUM OF TIME
.A quantum means the smallest possible discrete unit of any physical property, such as energy or matter.

.A chronon is a unit of time, as part of a hypothesis that proposes that time is not continuous, considered to be the smallest time interval that can be measured.

.A chronon is a quantum of time.

.How many chronons will fit into a moving image?

This project is dedicated to divulge Video Art and Audio Visual-Art in all its modalities, any processes of image-sound interaction without exclusion of experimental-expanded cinema and similar processes, with the aim to disclose to the great public a view of the consolidated video artists and offer a platform for all those emergent video artists with a future projection who contribute with renewing proposals, avoid conventional visual language and does not find their place in other mass media spaces.

Call for Artists & Designers – Quest for Permanence Exhibition

Florida Gulf Coast University in Fort Myers, FL.
Summer 2016 Exhibition
Bower School of Music and the Arts. Art Program.

We're looking for artists/designers. The theme is permanence and persistence through social media and technology.

"Quest for Permanence is a human project in time and place. We leave traces (ghosts?)to give us the illusion of permanence. We are brave in this adventure because we battle time itself or we collude with time all the while planning our greatest deception. We assure ourselves that it is for others that we leave our traces. Our generosity will enlighten or entertain. The truth is, of course, we want to live forever. Quest for Permanence is an exhibit of work that examines humans at play with time in its many forms and the tensions that arise as time and place collide."