Tag Archives: May 2016 Deadline

Call for applications, symposium: Art History in Digital Dimensions

Deadline: May 30, 2016

Supported by the Getty Foundation and the Kress Foundation, the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities of the University of Maryland will host a symposium, "Art History in Digital Dimensions," on October 19-21, 2016. We aim to unite diverse audiences and practitioners in a critical intervention for digital art history, providing a road map for the future. We seek applications for 15 participants, including 5 graduate students, to join 25 invited contributors. Participants will have experience from the academy and/or museum in art-historical research practices that intersect with the digital realm. Full CFP and guidelines at www.dah-dimensions.org.

The symposium, Art History in Digital Dimensions, is a joint enterprise of the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Call For Artists: Black Box Arts & Technology Festival, Seattle

*Open Call for Artists: Black Box 3.0*

Eligibility: International
Location: Seattle, Online
Application Deadline: May 31, 2016 at 5PM PST

Festival Dates: September 21 - October 2, 2016
Hashtag: #BlackBoxing
Shareable URL: bit.ly/blackboxing

Artists from around the world working in any medium are invited to submit work to Black Box 3.0. A multi-platform program of significant scope, Black Box is an annual international arts and technology festival produced by Aktionsart in Seattle. The festival explores how technology is transforming the arts, culture, and public life.

Black Box is a platform for the most talented and innovative artists, filmmakers, designers, curators, technologists, hackers, and makers in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. The festival features new work by international contemporary artists who are collected by major museums and routinely featured on the international art circuit. It is also an essential voice for emerging talent. Black Box is open to all arts disciplines and mediums, including visual art, performance, design, fashion, music, folk and traditional arts, literature, media, film, research, theater, and more.

Core programming is nomadic and experiential, presenting projects in unexpected spaces throughout the city. The tightly curated festival includes exhibitions, screenings, discussions, workshops, installations, performances, and hybrid formats. An online channel - which received over 25,000 visits in 2015 - premieres and distributes festival content to audiences in Seattle and beyond.

Black Box collaborates closely with a selective partner network of Seattle’s most adventurous institutions. Past partners include Seattle Art Museum, Seattle International Film Festival, University of Washington, Seattle Center, and Cornish College of the Arts. In 2015, Black Box exhibited over eighty artists including new work from Pierre Huyghe, Ed Atkins, Sue de Beer, Phil Collins, Josh Kline, Gillian Wearing, Roman Signer, Zach Blas, Petra Cortright, Lisa Tan, Stan Douglas, Knut Asdam, Kalup Linzy, Robin Rhode, Ellie Ga, and Julien Prévieux.

There is no overarching festival theme beyond the umbrella of “arts and technology”, which is intentionally open. Attention will be closely paid to intellectually rigorous and socially urgent ideas, emerging technologies, and experimental projects that present new modes of creating and thinking. We are interested in works that respond to the following themes, tools or mediums: augmented and virtual reality, gaming, expanded and immersive cinema, social media, architectural mapping, generative software, systems, mobility and mobile apps, wearables, digital labor, interactivity, data visualization, experimental and interactive documentary, surveillance, biotech, holography, space exploration, 3D printing, robotics, production and distribution tools/platforms, artificial intelligence, machine learning, hypercompliance, deep web, blockchain, digital culture, sustainability, innovation, disnovation, transmedia, utopia.

Technology disrupts the arts, but how do the arts disrupt technology? What is the role of artist and creator in an increasingly mechanized world? How can artists leverage new tools to produce, distribute, create access, and build audiences for their work? How does technological innovation and disnovation shape public life?

APPLY: www.aktionsart.org/submissions


Aktionsart is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit laboratory based in Seattle that cultivates entrepreneurial actions in the arts and technology. Our mission is to engage technology, design and contemporary culture to produce ambitious art projects in public and private space. We support artists who use technology for positive cultural impact and social innovation.

www.aktionsart.org
www.twitter.com/aktionsart

 

Media-N Fall 2016 Issue CFP

Uncovering News: Reporting and Forms of New Media Art

Media-N -2016 fall issue: V. 12 N. 3

Guest Editors

Abigail Susik, Willamette University

Grant Taylor, Lebanon Valley College

Editor-In-Chief

Kevin Hamilton

Media-N, the Journal of the New Media Caucus, invites submissions for an issue about new media art and its relation to news, reportage, and journalism. Relevant subjects could include: media artworks that address news as subject or form; the influence of new media art on journalism; or critical/historical analysis of the reporting of new media art in popular or disciplinary press venues.

Media artists have mined news and journalism as raw material, as distribution form, and as a rhetorical act of reportage. Artists such as Paper Tiger Television or Negativland drew from television news broadcasts in their critical cut-ups. Feminist and aboriginal video art collectives such as Amelia Productions emerged in Vancouver out of counter-news video documentary efforts. Among contemporary tactical media artists such as the Yes Men or Critical Art Ensemble, mainstream news serves as distribution method or site of intervention. Still others have sought to critique the reliable reporter position of modern journalism, or to create new alternative networks for counter-hegemonic news production.

Media art has also benefitted from many a new platform for reporting and distribution of news about new works and ideas. Email listservs, mailed newsletters, faxes, episodic video, magazines, radio, or social media, have not only served as channels for sharing new works, but as forms of expression and community. Net artists learned about other net.art through the Thing, Rhizome, or even the Well before deploying their own web artworks back into those spaces. Sound artists tuned in to programs on ResonanceFM or San Francisco’s KQED before sending in their own works for broadcast, or gaining a show of their own.

Submissions for this special issue on new media art and news, reportage, and journalism might address the following questions:

  • How do new media artworks engage with journalism, information leaks, and information dissemination?
  • How and why has mainstream news covered media art as a story?
  • How are new media forms and aesthetics, from locative media to visualization or even physical computing, altering the work of journalists?
  • What is the status of new media arts reporting and criticism today? How do modes of communication, transmission and reception inform new media art?
  • How is the field of new media art as a whole affected by reporting, reviews and criticism of developing trends, and what is the significance of the modalities in which this dialogue takes shape?
  • How will we write about art and technology in the future, given new and emerging publishing platforms?
  • How has new media art as a field been particularly influenced by news and reportage as a primary disciplinary component in the work of dissemination, critique, and knowledge construction?

 

Media-N is an English language journal, and all submissions must be received in English adhering to the standards set by the 16th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.

(http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/)

Media-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus (ISSN: 1942-017X) is a scholarly, invitational, and double blind peer-reviewed journal. It is open to submissions in the form of theoretical papers, reports, and reviews on new media artworks. The journal provides a forum for national and international New Media Caucus members and non-members featuring their scholarly research, artworks and projects.

TIMELINE:

June 15, 2016: Deadline for submission of abstracts/proposals.

July 15, 2016: Notification of acceptance.

September 15, 2016: Deadline for submission of final papers.

ABSTRACT GUIDELINES:

Please send your submission proposal by email adhering to the following:

Proposal Title, and a 300-500 word Proposal Description. Include your Email(s), your Title(s)/Affiliation(s) (the institution/organization you work with ­ if applicable, or independent scholar/practitioner).

On a separate document, send a Resume (no longer than 3 pages).

NOTE: Materials should be submitted in English, as Microsoft Word documents (.doc or .docx).

SEND THE SUBMISSION TO:

Email to: asusik@willamette.edu - AND – taylor@lvc.edu