Tag Archives: New York

#CrisisPedagogy

HOW TO TEACH ART AND ART HISTORY UNDER CONDITIONS OF CRISIS?

Teaching Resource Sharing Party
Friday, February 17, 7-10pm
e-flux, 311 E Broadway (accessible by B,D,F,J,M,Z trains)

Bring your data! Flash drives, JPGs, PDFs, PPTs, lesson plans, syllabi, etc., or send files to crisispedagogy@gmail.com.

Drinks and bites will be provided; additional contributions are welcome.

Sponsored by the Society of Contemporary Art Historians, Sense of Emergency, Art History That, Association for Latin American Art, Association of Historians of American Art, the European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum, Material Collective, New Media Caucus, Queer Caucus for Art, US Latinx Art Forum, Visual Culture Caucus, The Research and Academic Program of the Clark Art Institute, and the College Art Association.

 

The Artery Enters into Special Artistic Collaboration with Award Winning Video Artist Ronen Sharabani

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New York, NY, December 6, 2016 – Renowned Art + Technology company The Artery, which is actively expanding its award winning talent base by seeking the most talented digital artists in the world, has established a special artistic collaboration with acclaimed Video Artist Ronen Sharabani, a 2006 Cannes Gold Lion Prize winner. Vico Sharabani, The Artery’s Founder and Creative Director, as well as a brother of Ronen Sharabani, made the announcement.

This new collaboration between The Artery and Sharabani has been designed for two purposes:

  • To develop and present innovative and original Video Content to museums, art galleries, and other special artistic venues around the world; and
  • To integrate Virtual Reality and other new technologies into Ronen Sharabani’s upcoming art exhibits, installations, and live special events around the world.

Regarding this new collaboration with his brother, Vico Sharabani said, “We are extremely excited about our new relationship with Ronen, a digital artist with the highest caliber of talent! Working in tandem with him, this new collaboration will allow us the first time to really ‘show off’ our skills and expertise in the world of Art, as well as our unique and innovative capabilities in the world of Technology. Ronen will be conceiving, producing and presenting never-before-seen artistic installations and experiences all over the world.”

He adds, “We want our clients to know about this new collaboration because it exemplifies how The Artery can bring deep artistic conversation and experience to their advertising projects. This cross pollination of art plus technology is the DNA behind our company. Historically, we’ve delivered feature film level imagery to commercials and music videos, and the latest, interactive technologies to enhance advertising campaigns and experiential experiences. Our art plus technology expertise is what makes our company truly unique, as we bring this approach to all of our projects, large and small.”

Ronen Sharabani said, “My constant urge to create has allowed me to produce a number of well-received exhibits so far, but as a solo artist, there have always been limits to how far I could go by myself. The exciting new collaboration with The Artery allows me to make a major jump to the next level. The Artery is a very high-end post house that compliments my work process as we both combine art and technology in innovative ways. By joining forces, we break the borders and barriers of what has been possible so far within the worlds of digital art and VR. The Artery is truly a unique company, and Vico has always been a person who can stretch the limits of computers and their capabilities. He is a highly improvisational artist, has mastered the blending of Art and Technology, and can create imagery from the 5% of hidden software that you can’t easily get from plug-ins. I am really looking forward to see what the future will bring!”

The Artery’s new relationship with Ronen Sharabani adds to the company’s existing collaborations with other noted video artists whose works have been exhibited widely in galleries and museums in the United States, as well as China. These exhibitions include those seen at the Whitney Museum of Art, Mass Moca, The Contemporary Austin, Zhejiang Art Museum, Hangzhou China, and many more.

ABOUT UPCOMING & RECENT RONEN SHARABANI PROJECTS:

At present, Sharabani is preparing for his next solo art exhibition, which will take place at the Nahum Gutman Museum of Art in Tel Aviv starting on December 20th. Entitled “Snap to Grid,” Sharabani’s new work, which he calls a “Smart Exhibition,” will be comprised of imagery projections against a very large wall at the museum. “Snap to Grid” will include computer renderings and 3D environments which will also be translated to VR. Sharabani and The Artery hope to export this VR experience during early 2017, to a live installation located in New York’s Union Square. As such, people in New York will be able to experience the same imagery simultaneously with people physically located at the Gutman Museum in Tel Aviv.

In late September 2016, The Paul E. Singer Foundation sponsored a collaboration between Start-Up Nation Central and Artis to create an interactive showcase of the innovations in the Israeli art world and art-related technology solutions. The event, which featured a talk and presentation by Ronen Sharabani, was held at Sotheby’s New York, in front of an audience of more than 150 New-York collectors, art curators, and business related executives from the art industry, and was the first in a series of events.

Additionally, Sharabani, in conjunction with technology supplied to him by The Artery, also presented a large projected exhibit at the Contemporary Austin during May 2016. His exhibit was presented in celebration of the Driscoll Villa at Laguna Gloria’s hundred year anniversary. For the event, Sharabani created a site-specific outdoor and indoor video projection, entitled “Matchbox,” featuring Israeli dancer Iyar Elezra of the Batsheva Dance Company, with music by Avi Belleli. Matchbox’s running time was 15 minutes on a loop – the projection ran for two hours. For more info about this exhibition, please see: http://www.thecontemporaryaustin.org/event/ronen-sharabani/

Regarding Sharabani’s “Matchbox” exhibit in Austin, Andrea Mellard, the Director of Public Programs & Community Engagement with the Contemporary Austin Museum, said, “Ronen Sharabani transformed the museum’s well-known architecture using cutting-edge technology. The incredible projections of his project ‘Matchbox’ made familiar details hidden, while his powerful imagery seemed to emerge into three-dimensions. People who know and love the building could not believe their eyes.”

ABOUT RONEN SHARABANI:

Ronen Sharabani, a 2006 winner of the Cannes Gold Lion Prize for “Best Creative Commercial,” lives and works in Tel Aviv, Israel. Ritual, struggle, faith, and politics take center stage in his works, not for didactic purposes, but as the gateway for transformational experiences.

Profoundly influenced by his experiences in his home country of Israel, where his Israeli “survivalist” thinking has colored his artistic perceptions and POV, Sharabani’s films and videos blend movement, performance, architecture, and light into intensely visual and sensory projects. Musical scores, replete with chanting and techno-like sounds, often overlay Sharabani’s moving images, allowing his films to be at once secular and spiritual.

Sharabani’s recent Art Exhibitions include “Matchbox” at Austin’s Driscoll Villa in celebration of the Laguna Gloria’s hundred year anniversary (May 2016); his public installation entitled “Blocks,” a centerpiece at the Musrara Mix Festival in Jerusalem in 2015  and “Chairs,” another of his public installations, which was featured during “White Night” in Tel Aviv in 2014.

During the course of his career, Ronen Sharabani has worked for a number of film, advertising and production companies, including The Artery, McCann-Erickson, Dreamworks, and Gravity VFX/Tel Aviv. Sharabani was Lead Compositor on the 2012 film “A Late Quartet,” and was Flame Compositor on the 2008 film “Ghost Town. He also served as the On-Set Digital FX Supervisor, while working with Rhino FX, on John Sayles’s 2004 feature film, “Silver City.”

In 2015, Sharabani appeared as himself in the short documentary film interview “Art in Clubs.” He earned a Certificate as a graduate of the New York Studio School, which he attended from 1999-2003.

ABOUT THE ARTERY:

Based in New York City, The Artery is a highly regarded Art +Technology company that designs, creates and produces unique and compelling visual content across all screens. The company has established partnerships with iconic brands, ad agencies, and entertainment studios to create high profile and compelling visual content for feature films, TV programs, commercials, music videos and art installations.

Utilizing breakthrough technologies, The Artery’s uniquely talented, curated teams -- which include its Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality unit, led by Creative & Technical Director Ronen Taschum, and its Experiential arm, led by Creative Director Yaron Tsinman -- also create stunning virtual reality content, experiential brand events, and 360-degree experiences for clients around the globe. The Artery offers custom-tailored A-teams and production pipelines, focused solely on efficiently achieving outstanding results.

With its global perspective, top-tier talent, newest technologies and unlimited creative capabilities, The Artery has the proven expertise to efficiently deliver extraordinary content, branding, and multimedia experiences, worldwide.

For Further Information visit The Artery’s Social Media Sites:

Assistant Professor of Creative Arts and Technologies at SUNY Polytechnic Institute

The Department of Communication and Humanities, College of Arts and Sciences at SUNY Polytechnic Institute seeks to hire an Assistant Professor whose research and practice addresses the intersections between the creative arts and technologies. The preferred candidate will be able to work at the levels of theory and practice, integrating insights and applications in the arts, humanities, and technologies to engage students to become creative thinkers, practitioners, and problem-solvers. The successful applicant will develop and teach a range of undergraduate and graduate courses that encourage students to explore and develop their creative, aesthetic, and technical abilities and that contribute to the degree programs and general education mission of the Department.

The Department offers a B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies, a B.S. in Communication and Information Design, a B.S. in Interactive Media and Game Design, and an M.S. in Information Design and Technology, and provides a range of general education in the arts and humanities. SUNY Polytechnic is developing a state-of-the-art makerspace and collaborative interdisciplinary learning environment and is seeking candidates who can leverage these facilities to explore and capitalize upon the intersections between the arts and technologies.

Persons interested in the above position should submit a resume, contact information for three work-related references, letter of application, and the SUNY Polytechnic employment application to www.sunypoly.edu/employment.


SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) is New York’s globally recognized, high-tech educational ecosystem. As the world’s most advanced, university-driven research enterprise, SUNY Poly boasts more than $43 billion in high-tech investments, over 300 corporate partners, and maintains a statewide footprint.

SUNY Poly is dedicated to the goal of building a diverse and inclusive teaching, research, and working environment. Potential applicants who share this goal, especially underrepresented minorities, women, persons with disabilities, and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

Fermenting at Flux (Live and Active Cultures: Part 2)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence

Over the course of my 5-month residency at Flux Factory in Long Island City, New York, I am recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers), as well as outside artists collaborating with Flux for its various public programs. Through its studio residency program, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.

For this interview, I invited Maya Jeffereis to talk about her current project, Fallout Shelter which stages a moral values exercise developed by the US Navy. Maya invited visitors to participate in the exercise at Flux Factory on July 14, as one of the featured collaborators for Interdependence DayFallout Shelter is on view at the Soho20 Gallery in Brooklyn until July 25 and the New Britain Museum of American Art through September 11. 

maya-jeffereis-fallout-shelter-2016

C: How did your Fallout Shelter project come about?
M: I found a U.S. Navy training manual at an abandoned military site in Puerto Rico. Inside was this exercise on moral values: a hypothetical apocalyptic scenario with ten people occupying a fallout shelter. As participants, you are on a civil defense committee appointed by the President and it's your job to decide which six occupants should remain in the shelter in order to rebuild society and which four have to leave, because there is only space for six. The exercise describes each occupant by very problematic statements that include information about age, race, gender, sexuality, profession, and ideology.

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Text taken from the fallout shelter exercise:

  1. Thirty-six year old female physician, known to be a confirmed racist.
  2. Marine drill instructor, 37, white, accused of brutality to recruits -- has a revolver.
  3. Black militant, 35 year old biological researcher (PhD).
  4. Biochemist, 62 years old, white male.
  5. Olympic athlete, 26, decathlon champion, Asian female.
  6. Hollywood starlet, 27 year old white female, known drug user.
  7. Third year male medical student -- homosexual, 28.
  8. Sixteen year old girl, pregnant, questionable IQ, high school dropout.
  9. Thirty year old Catholic priest, Hispanic.
  10. Thirty-eight year old carpenter, and “Mr. Fix-It” man. Served seven years for pushing narcotics, has been out of jail for 7 months.

C: How did you take the ideas from that document and transform them into a work?
M: The most interesting aspect of the exercise was the conversation about identity politics and values that it opened up. I invited participants to my studio to complete the exercise and make their own decisions about whom to keep and whom to remove. They improvised on camera playing three roles: a member of the civil defense committee discussing their decisions, an occupant they chose to keep, and an occupant they chose to get rid of. In the role of the fallout shelter occupants, they would make a video confessional speech about why they should remain in the shelter, with the idea that their speech would be sent to the civil defense committee making decisions.

C: How does the two-channel format influence our understanding of the content in the speeches?
M: The video is edited together with the civil defense committee members on the left channel and the fallout shelter occupants on the right. By having the same performer play three distinct roles, you get a conflict of interest. For example, you might see a member of the civil defense committee on the left talking about why we should get rid of the Hollywood Starlet but then on the right, you see the same performer making an argument in defense of herself. Many different performers play each of the occupants, so you might see 10 different performers playing the role of the Marine Drill Instructor. I wanted to create a collective identity for each of the 10 occupants that would represent the range of arguments for or against each occupant. This would expose latent biases, because you're having a very direct and open conversation about race and identity politics and your own values. You are also building your own conception of a utopia by doing this thought experiment of what it would mean to rebuild society. What kind of society are you building? What do you hope to bring to a new society and what do you wish to leave behind?

C: How many people participated and did they write their own scripts?
M: About 35 people participated in the video and all of the performers improvised their own parts. When directing the video, I offered some general guidelines but tried not to influence what they said because it was about what each person brought to their own performance.

C: You don’t guide them as to whether they should use their own value system or approach it like a philosophical exercise?
M: I’m interested in this gray area between the performance of the self and the performance of a character. Where do you draw the line between the two? When performing a character, you are calling on personal experiences and external experiences that you have observed or absorbed through culture and media and these experiences become internalized. When performing your own identity, I think of Erving Goffman’s research on how an individual acts differently in different contexts, constantly adapting to various situations. The question of real versus fictional can be asked of both the performer and the performed.

C: In reading the document, there is an absurdity to the exercise that makes it hard to take seriously, but there is something about watching people act it out that feels surreal and frightening in its plausibility.
M: I think of the occupants of the fallout shelter as archetypes: you have The Doctor, The Soldier, the Academic, The Athlete, The Movie Star, and so on. Each archetype may have varying degrees of relatability, depending on your own background. For example, the Female Physician is described as a “confirmed racist.” How do we interpret this information, especially when it seems to present a conflict of interest between a doctor who swears the Hippocratic Oath and a confirmed racist who may refuse to treat certain patients? When the participants play the occupants, they begin to humanize these characters, giving insight into their personalities, their flaws, and their motivations. Perhaps it’s this sense of empathy imbued in the performance or conveyed to the viewer that is unsettling, because we’re confronting morally ambiguous and ambivalent issues. But that’s the great thing about this thought experiment: it gets us to have very frank and candid discussions about difficult topics, like race, policing, and gun control--issues that we’re facing right at this very moment.

Maya Jeffereis is a video, performance, and installation artist based in New York. Her work has been shown most recently at SOHO20 Gallery, Flux Factory, and NARS Foundation. She holds a MFA from Hunter College and a BFA and BA from the University of Washington. Maya is also the Public Engagement Associate of Adult and Access Programs at the Guggenheim.

Christina Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Haverford College in Pennsylvania and currently an artist-in-residence at Flux Factory in New York.

 

Fermenting at Flux: Live & Active Cultures (Part 1)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence

Over the course of my 5-month residency at Flux Factory I will be recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers). Through its studio residency program in Long Island City, NY, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.  The next exhibition opening on July 20th in Flux's gallery is "Thinking Like a Machine," by Niki Passath.

Interview with Niki Passath

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C: Tell me about your opening on July 20th.

N: It’s a hybrid event, both workshop and exhibition. The robotics workshop starts at noon and finishes when the opening reception begins, at 6pm. We will experiment with the machines we have made as a performance during the opening.

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C: What are the materials you are using?

N: Styrofoam, wooden skewers, straws, mobile phone batteries, and e-waste.

[Recently Niki has been making robots that paint]

C: How do you see the action of the robot painting as cultural critique?

N: I propose new ways for looking at technology.  For example, a lot of people think, you can do anything with a good programming language. In reality, you are limited to what the producer of that language could conceptualize.

C: The robot acts as an intermediary, creating distance between you and the final painting. I assume you are thinking about technology mediating relationships and how we connect emotionally or disconnect.

N:  How we communicate and use technology nowadays, is the wrong way because we connect, mainly over software which has a reason. That reason is to make money. It might be a social software but the intention is different. There used to be couch surfing for free. The next idea was Airbnb, which was a good idea, but businesses were destroyed and in many cities the rents have increased.

C: It points to a global issue, of prioritizing short term consumer experience over long term sustainability.

N: It’s subjectivism, vs objectivism. The idea that everything that I would like to have and consume is inherently good.

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C: The lines these days are a bit blurred, but a lack of specific function is often inherent to what defines art, as opposed to design or craft. How do you think about the function of your robots? Aren’t they unnecessary?

N: I come from the classical music world. An instrument is a very elaborate technological device. Even when you use that machine to create music, you interpret the composition. The musician, is a very small element in the whole system. There could be a billion musicians, but the way they interpret the work is special.

C: The point is not to make a painting.

N: I tried it, it’s not something that I like. I really enjoy the traces of the robots, they take two to three hours. It might be the same amount of time for me to make it myself, but I prefer if the robot makes it. It’s a very intense, emotional time for me. The reason for having the robots paint, is the connection to the idea of trace and cave painting. Everything the robots do is recorded by the trace, it is the abstract form of each robot's movement.

C: You create the robots with some intentional element of failure?

N: Yes, I realized that if there are small mistakes in the form, the behavior changes and it becomes very lifelike. My theory is that every great idea came out of a misunderstanding of something.

C: Are you open about the code and the technical process?

N: I come out of the open source world. If you look at the score for a piece of music, that is the source code of the piece. In some cases, I write code onto the gallery wall. Calling it a score can help you see code differently. It’s more interesting to create scores for machines, than a very dry, technical code.

Niki_paint_robot2

C: The world of technology is still very male dominated, and your robots are working with the abstract expressionist language, which is also a male dominated language. Specifically this idea of the paintbrush as phallus is a reminder of this.

N: I’m looking forward to the conversation here in the United States, because Jackson Pollock is not so important in my world and I’m not coming out of that tradition. I was never a painter. I’m interested in the gesture, but not what a painter thinks is a gesture.

C: Your work reminds me of Yves Klein, with the traces of  bodies on canvas, performance in the gallery space, musical scores, neo-dada style happenings; also Nam June Paik releasing a robot into the street to be hit by a car.  It’s an event, alive and organic.

N: There’s no instructions for the evening. If you don’t look closely it would seem like a normal opening reception, with the artist present. It’s more subtle and I wouldn’t want it to be otherwise.

Niki Passath teaches Interface Design at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Christina Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Haverford College in Pennsylvania. Both are currently artists-in-residence at Flux Factory in New York, where Niki will be leading a robotics workshop on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, followed by an opening reception and exhibition: http://www.fluxfactory.org/events/robot-making-workshop/

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Call for Applications to The Art & Law Program

Applications are now open for the Fall 2016 session of the Art & Law Program in New York City.

Information about the Art & Law Program is available here: http://www.artlawprogram.com/new-page/

Applications are accepted online here: http://www.artlawprogram.com/new-page-1/

Fellows of The Program meet once a week for a 3-hour seminar to discuss readings and visual materials with the Director of the Program, Sergio Muñoz Sarmiento, curator/art historian and Associate Director of the Program, Lauren van Haaften-Schick, and/or with a guest seminar leader. There is an emphasis on the close analysis of legal cases, texts and materials. Through this examination of legal structures and modes of thought, the Program aims to critique current artistic, curatorial, theoretical, art historical, and design practices and methodologies. At the conclusion of the seminars, Fall term Fellows are expected to participate in a pecha-kucha presentation.

Applicants with backgrounds in art, art history/criticism, curating, architecture, film, writing, philosophy, business, economics, sociology, urban planning, political science and history are strongly encouraged to apply.

The Fall 2016 term runs from September 12 to December 12, 2016. Seminars will be held at the School of Visual Arts, in New York City, on Monday nights from 6pm to 9pm.

Applications for the Fall 2016 term are due on July 4, 2016. Application inquiries should be sent via e-mail to Sergio Muñoz Sarmiento: sms@artlawoffice.com


The Art & Law Program is a seminar series & residency program with a theoretical and philosophical focus on the effects of law and jurisprudence on cultural production and reception.

CALL FOR PAPERS/PRESENTATIONS – NMC at CAA

College Art Association in NYC
Feb 15-18, 2017
Deadline: June 10, 2016

New Media Caucus at CAA
Other Media: Decolonizing practices and cyborg ontologies

CALL FOR PAPERS/PRESENTATIONS

“Rather than going for the new object of study, the new product to consume, one should work on new ways of seeing, of being, or of living in the world.” – Trihn T. Minh-Ha from D-Passage: The Digital Way

“Cyborg writing is about the power to survive, not on the basis of original innocence, but on the basis of seizing the tools to mark the world that marked them as other.” – Donna Haraway from A Cyborg Manifesto

Following Donna Haraway’s epochal work A Cyborg Manifesto in which she imagines the cyborg condition as a site of liberation and decolonized subjectivity, this panel considers diverse approaches of artists, historians, theoretician-practitioners, and media activists that encode strategies of decolonization in their work and practice. Through a critical engagement of code as a (rhetorical) tool to re-inscribe historically marginalized bodies, this panel looks at a broad array of efforts, tactics, and projects that consider the ethos of a cyborg condition imagined by Haraway’s writing. As part of this conversation, we may begin to ask: through what means and technologies are these situations deployed? What are the strategies that allow for decolonized processes that are situated within feminist, queer, and anti-colonial subjectivities? And how do these methods enable, embody, and construct new realities of being?

Recognizing new media’s ability to rupture obsolete systems in the efforts to reconstruct other idealized ontologies, this panel extends the cyborg condition through theoretical approaches and practice in an effort to re-imagine human relation. In particular, this panel seeks to address how new media practice and theory can reconfigure our understandings of marginality as well as offer strategies that enable the repositioning of subjects so as to decolonize their subjectivity.

Artists, historians, theoretician-practitioners, and media activists are all invited to submit their work for consideration for this New Media Caucus panel at the College Art Association in New York February 2017. Interested applicants should submit an abstract, 3-4 samples of their work as a link (if necessary), a CV, and their contact information. Accepted panel participants will need to either register for the CAA conference or buy a one-day pass. Submissions are due June 3, 2017 to Alejandro T. Acierto at acierto [at] uic [dot] edu. Notifications will be sent out around July 1.

Call for Panel Proposals – CAA New York 2017

The New Media Caucus invites panel proposals for a 1.5-hour affiliated panel session to be held during the 2017 College Art Association annual conference in New York.

Proposals must address issues related to new media. Panel chairs will submit the proposal and organize the session, including its call for submissions. The NMC Exhibitions & Events Committee will assist with providing liaison to CAA, administration, publicity, etc.

PROPOSALS MUST INCLUDE:

  • completed Proposal Application Form – DOWNLOAD HERE
  • 3-page CV, submitted as PDF
  • 300 – 600 word abstract addressing:

concept for the panel
areas of investigation
questions the panel will raise
specific topic areas presenters might address

PUBLISHING REQUIREMENT: Media-N Journal of the New Media Caucus will publish a conference edition after the CAA conference, showcasing conference proceedings sponsored by the NMC. To this end, Individuals are required to submit materials for the journal edition. Media-N offers flexibility regarding how to achieve the publishing requirement. Once invitations are accepted, the Editor-in-Chief of Media-N will contact the chair(s) to further discuss and plan for the publishing requirement. All materials for publication must be completed by mid-April after the conference.

NOTES:

  • two people may apply as co-chairs.
  • multiple proposals are not accepted.
  • panel chairs (and panelists) must be NMC members. 
There are no membership fees. JOIN NMC
  • panel chairs (and panelists) do not need to be CAA members.
  • NMC does not fund conference fees, transportation, or hotels for chairs or panelists.
  • Panel participants must either register for the CAA conference or buy a one-day pass.
  • Chairing or presenting during a 1.5 hour session does not disqualify you from chairing a panel or serving as a panelist in a general CAA session.

TIMELINE:
Peer review will occur shortly after the deadline. 
Notification of acceptance will be by April 18.

DEADLINE:
 April 7, 2016. Email submissions to Tohm Judson at tohm@tohmjudson.com

Triple Canopy Commissions at New York Public Library Labs

Apply online by midnight June 30, 2015. Commission recipients will be announced on September 1.
 
For the sixth annual call for proposals, Triple Canopy is pleased to announce a partnership with New York Public Library Labs, which will support two commissions. Triple Canopy invites applicants to propose projects that engage a collection or body of materials, physical or digital, in the NYPL’s holdings. Applicants are asked to consider archival material both critically and imaginatively, in its capacity to evidence past events and practices as well as to form the basis for new creative work. Individuals pursuing research toward an MA or PhD thesis may not apply with a proposal that encompasses or includes their degree-related work.
 
Recipients of commissions will receive:
  • Eight to twelve months of artistic, editorial, and technical support;
  • Six months of access to one of the research study rooms at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building;
  • Access to reference librarians for one-on-one consultations;
  • An honorarium of $2,000;
  • The opportunity to present work related to the commission as a public program hosted by the NYPL;
  • Coordination and production of any print publication or live event that results from the recipient’s work;
  • The opportunity for inclusion in Triple Canopy’s annual print anthology, Invalid Format;
  • Archiving of materials and long-term maintenance of any online version of the project by Triple Canopy in partnership with New York University's Fales Library and Special Collections.