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Fermenting at Flux: Live and Active Cultures (Part 3)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence and Visiting Assistant Professor, Haverford College

Over the course of my residency at Flux Factory in Long Island City, New York, I am recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers), as well as outside artists collaborating with Flux for its various public programs. Through its studio residency program, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.

For this interview, Christina invited Caitlin Foley and Misha Rabinovich, faculty at UMASS Lowell, to talk about their ongoing project, Total Jump. Artspace in New Haven, CT commissioned Foley and Rabinovich to present Total Jump for Game On! on view at the Goffe Street Armory, October 15 and 16 from 12-6pm.

CF: Tell me about your project for New Haven City-Wide Open Studios

Misha: We are creating a multiplayer game that facilitates a worldwide coordinated jump. This came out of the idea that we could cause a massive earthquake if we organize everyone to land in unison. The near impossibility of accomplishing a Total Jump and the ease and fun of training for it invites the audience to bridge the gap between a postmodern pluralistic world and the necessity of global coordinated actions in the face of the Anthropocene.

Caitlin: The first version of Total Jump Training was a one to two player game where participants time their jump to land on zero. This was included in A Wicked Problem at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts. To help create a playful energetic environment our friends Gold Bikini wrote Jump Up!, which has lyrics about the concept, specifically for Total Jump. For Game On! we are excited to present an eight player, immersive installation of Total Jump where participants stand in a circle facing both the animated projection and each other.

Misha: We also released the first version of the Total Jump Live phone app (available for iOS/Android) to coincide with City-Wide Open Studios, which people are using to practice jumping, and for us to send notifications for global jumps.

CF: I realize that Total Jump functions as a metaphor. Do you joke about how this technology could be applied to larger societal movements?

Misha: For us it started out as a joke, but since then it has been exhibited at EFA Project Space in NYC, and Boston Cyberarts Gallery, among others.  The fact that people actually want to try it means that it is entering into the non-ironic territory.

Caitlin: In some cases we were amazed that people love this as much as they do. It has been really fun and heartwarming to see.

Misha:  There are also instances where this jump has been attempted. MythBusters organized a group jump at the Stewart & Colbert Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear in 2010 and calculated how much meat would hit the ground, using seismic measurements.

CF: How does this work relate to the rest of your artistic practice and other artists’ work that inspire you?

Caitlin: Total Jump connects to some of the ideas evident in our mobile sauna project. We were thinking about neighborliness and noting that people in our culture often don’t get to know their neighbors unless there is a disaster — whether large or small. We wanted to contribute to creating a culture of neighborliness that is not dependent on calamity. We may be in the midst of the sixth extinction, but people don't necessarily feel the depth of this. This jumping game creates a bonding experience in a fun and playful way that’s accessible and connects these ideas for us.

Misha: The Estonian singing revolution is an historic example. This was a series of events that led to Estonia’s exit from the USSR. People held hands along the Estonian border and sang together, and throughout the country groups would burst out into song to be in solidarity with each other, as a way to remember their heritage. It creatively led them back to independence. Another example is an action by Christoph Schlingensief, the German performance artist & theatre director. He invited people to take part in an anti-chancellor swim in lake Wolfgang, Austria. Four million bathers were organized to enter the water, with the intention of raising the water level and flooding the area. The idea is that the critical mass would overwhelm the conditions, and cause a paradigm shift in some way. Law enforcement prevented the demonstration from taking place.

CF:  A lot of times we talk about future potentiality in a very abstract way. Those historical precedents validate the real possibilities of creative work.  Have you thought about doing any programming along with Total Jump to build on larger ideas of collective action?

Caitlin: For me there is still enough openness in the piece that it can be ironic while it is also sincere. In one of the animations for Total Jump characters surround the world, jump and then the world breaks. Joint action can be a powerful and positive tool, however, one of the reasons we are experiencing climate change is mass action. For example, there are an immense number of people driving cars and contributing to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. There is a dual interpretation: the jump can symbolize coming together for the greater good and also the impact we as a species are having on the earth.

Misha: The anthropocene has come, but we don’t really know what that is. Intellectually we can know it, but we don’t feel the power of that collective agency. It reminds me of Player Piano, by Kurt Vonnegut. It takes place in a techno-dystopia, inspired by his work at GE. At the end there is a cataclysm. Everyone destroys the technology and then out of this total revolt, people are bored. One of the characters starts to fiddle around with broken pieces of technology and makes a little automated thing for entertainment, and everyone is really into it, starting the cycle again. In our animation the earth cracks and then another earth comes out of it. We wanted to stage a poetic interpretation of the anthropocene, and ask where our cultural power is leading us.

CF: Earlier this summer we talked about the debate between Claire Bishop and Grant Kester regarding antagonism. For a work to be successful does it need to be shocking or aggressive?

Misha: Well everyone jumping at once and causing an earthquake could be pretty catastrophic. The geologists we have spoken with say it is unlikely, unless we lined everyone up at the San Andreas and other fault lines. From the Grant Kester point of view, maybe it could lead to advocating for other actions that bring us all together. Any infrastructure that builds synchronicity, like the one enabled via our app, could easily be instrumentalized for different goals, however. We are open to that though, and people should get in touch if they want to schedule a global jump to coincide with their needs, for example during an event, and hopefully get a worldwide audience.

CF: Technology can have a way of over-inflating how important we feel socially, and yet we still might not believe that we can affect anything within a political spectrum. The proposed image of people lining up on a fault line is really powerful. It reminds me of the Francis Alÿs piece, When Faith Move Mountains. It’s exciting to think that something very physical could result from the otherwise intangible experience of engaging with tech.

Caitlin: The phone app offers the possibility for people to jump no matter where they are. People around the world can jump simultaneously.  Potentially they can jump across the room from each other and see each other in the real world, therefore forming a bond. We are interested in the complex social issues within this intersection of physical and technological experience. Even during an installation of the training game, one of the gallery assistants was a little nervous about jumping and seemed to feel ridiculous. People have reservations about how they appear taking an action. The way people use the app could be really interesting. If you get a notification when you are walking down the street, would you stop and jump?

CF: I think this brings up the public/private dichotomy. We live so much of our lives online- we might feel comfortable engaging politically in the online realm, but hesitate to go out and protest in the street. The two actions feel really different, but one can affect the other. There is still a certain power and presence to the physical world.

Caitlin: What’s exciting in the phone app is the possibility of existing in both spaces simultaneously.

BIO
Caitlin Foley and Misha Rabinovich work collaboratively as artists and curators to create works which engage ideas and practices involving sharing communities, livable ecologies, and the transmutation of waste. Among other things they create interactive games, installations, and happenings where audience participation is a key component of the work and its message. Projects such as their DS Institute Sweat Battery actively creates/engages a sharing community through the collection of sweat from participants using our mobile sauna, presents an alternative ecology for energy production, and transforms sweat “waste” into power to charge cell phones and symbolize collective energy. Their work has been exhibited in the US, Canada, and Europe at such venues as EFA Project Space (NYC), Flux Factory (NYC), the New Museum’s Ideas City Festival (NYC), Marymount California University (LA), the Torrance Art Museum in (LA), the Everson Museum of Art (Syracuse, NY), SIGGRAPH (LA), High Desert Test Sites HQ (Joshua Tree), Prague Biennale (Czech Republic), KCHUNG Radio (LA) and the Arts Center of the Capital Region (Troy, NY). Misha is an Assistant Professor of Interactive Media and Caitlin is part-time faculty in the Art and Design Department at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

#CrisisPedagogy

HOW TO TEACH ART AND ART HISTORY UNDER CONDITIONS OF CRISIS?

Teaching Resource Sharing Party
Friday, February 17, 7-10pm
e-flux, 311 E Broadway (accessible by B,D,F,J,M,Z trains)

Bring your data! Flash drives, JPGs, PDFs, PPTs, lesson plans, syllabi, etc., or send files to crisispedagogy@gmail.com.

Drinks and bites will be provided; additional contributions are welcome.

Sponsored by the Society of Contemporary Art Historians, Sense of Emergency, Art History That, Association for Latin American Art, Association of Historians of American Art, the European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum, Material Collective, New Media Caucus, Queer Caucus for Art, US Latinx Art Forum, Visual Culture Caucus, The Research and Academic Program of the Clark Art Institute, and the College Art Association.

 

The Artery Enters into Special Artistic Collaboration with Award Winning Video Artist Ronen Sharabani

snap-to-grid-sharabani

New York, NY, December 6, 2016 – Renowned Art + Technology company The Artery, which is actively expanding its award winning talent base by seeking the most talented digital artists in the world, has established a special artistic collaboration with acclaimed Video Artist Ronen Sharabani, a 2006 Cannes Gold Lion Prize winner. Vico Sharabani, The Artery’s Founder and Creative Director, as well as a brother of Ronen Sharabani, made the announcement.

This new collaboration between The Artery and Sharabani has been designed for two purposes:

  • To develop and present innovative and original Video Content to museums, art galleries, and other special artistic venues around the world; and
  • To integrate Virtual Reality and other new technologies into Ronen Sharabani’s upcoming art exhibits, installations, and live special events around the world.

Regarding this new collaboration with his brother, Vico Sharabani said, “We are extremely excited about our new relationship with Ronen, a digital artist with the highest caliber of talent! Working in tandem with him, this new collaboration will allow us the first time to really ‘show off’ our skills and expertise in the world of Art, as well as our unique and innovative capabilities in the world of Technology. Ronen will be conceiving, producing and presenting never-before-seen artistic installations and experiences all over the world.”

He adds, “We want our clients to know about this new collaboration because it exemplifies how The Artery can bring deep artistic conversation and experience to their advertising projects. This cross pollination of art plus technology is the DNA behind our company. Historically, we’ve delivered feature film level imagery to commercials and music videos, and the latest, interactive technologies to enhance advertising campaigns and experiential experiences. Our art plus technology expertise is what makes our company truly unique, as we bring this approach to all of our projects, large and small.”

Ronen Sharabani said, “My constant urge to create has allowed me to produce a number of well-received exhibits so far, but as a solo artist, there have always been limits to how far I could go by myself. The exciting new collaboration with The Artery allows me to make a major jump to the next level. The Artery is a very high-end post house that compliments my work process as we both combine art and technology in innovative ways. By joining forces, we break the borders and barriers of what has been possible so far within the worlds of digital art and VR. The Artery is truly a unique company, and Vico has always been a person who can stretch the limits of computers and their capabilities. He is a highly improvisational artist, has mastered the blending of Art and Technology, and can create imagery from the 5% of hidden software that you can’t easily get from plug-ins. I am really looking forward to see what the future will bring!”

The Artery’s new relationship with Ronen Sharabani adds to the company’s existing collaborations with other noted video artists whose works have been exhibited widely in galleries and museums in the United States, as well as China. These exhibitions include those seen at the Whitney Museum of Art, Mass Moca, The Contemporary Austin, Zhejiang Art Museum, Hangzhou China, and many more.

ABOUT UPCOMING & RECENT RONEN SHARABANI PROJECTS:

At present, Sharabani is preparing for his next solo art exhibition, which will take place at the Nahum Gutman Museum of Art in Tel Aviv starting on December 20th. Entitled “Snap to Grid,” Sharabani’s new work, which he calls a “Smart Exhibition,” will be comprised of imagery projections against a very large wall at the museum. “Snap to Grid” will include computer renderings and 3D environments which will also be translated to VR. Sharabani and The Artery hope to export this VR experience during early 2017, to a live installation located in New York’s Union Square. As such, people in New York will be able to experience the same imagery simultaneously with people physically located at the Gutman Museum in Tel Aviv.

In late September 2016, The Paul E. Singer Foundation sponsored a collaboration between Start-Up Nation Central and Artis to create an interactive showcase of the innovations in the Israeli art world and art-related technology solutions. The event, which featured a talk and presentation by Ronen Sharabani, was held at Sotheby’s New York, in front of an audience of more than 150 New-York collectors, art curators, and business related executives from the art industry, and was the first in a series of events.

Additionally, Sharabani, in conjunction with technology supplied to him by The Artery, also presented a large projected exhibit at the Contemporary Austin during May 2016. His exhibit was presented in celebration of the Driscoll Villa at Laguna Gloria’s hundred year anniversary. For the event, Sharabani created a site-specific outdoor and indoor video projection, entitled “Matchbox,” featuring Israeli dancer Iyar Elezra of the Batsheva Dance Company, with music by Avi Belleli. Matchbox’s running time was 15 minutes on a loop – the projection ran for two hours. For more info about this exhibition, please see: http://www.thecontemporaryaustin.org/event/ronen-sharabani/

Regarding Sharabani’s “Matchbox” exhibit in Austin, Andrea Mellard, the Director of Public Programs & Community Engagement with the Contemporary Austin Museum, said, “Ronen Sharabani transformed the museum’s well-known architecture using cutting-edge technology. The incredible projections of his project ‘Matchbox’ made familiar details hidden, while his powerful imagery seemed to emerge into three-dimensions. People who know and love the building could not believe their eyes.”

ABOUT RONEN SHARABANI:

Ronen Sharabani, a 2006 winner of the Cannes Gold Lion Prize for “Best Creative Commercial,” lives and works in Tel Aviv, Israel. Ritual, struggle, faith, and politics take center stage in his works, not for didactic purposes, but as the gateway for transformational experiences.

Profoundly influenced by his experiences in his home country of Israel, where his Israeli “survivalist” thinking has colored his artistic perceptions and POV, Sharabani’s films and videos blend movement, performance, architecture, and light into intensely visual and sensory projects. Musical scores, replete with chanting and techno-like sounds, often overlay Sharabani’s moving images, allowing his films to be at once secular and spiritual.

Sharabani’s recent Art Exhibitions include “Matchbox” at Austin’s Driscoll Villa in celebration of the Laguna Gloria’s hundred year anniversary (May 2016); his public installation entitled “Blocks,” a centerpiece at the Musrara Mix Festival in Jerusalem in 2015  and “Chairs,” another of his public installations, which was featured during “White Night” in Tel Aviv in 2014.

During the course of his career, Ronen Sharabani has worked for a number of film, advertising and production companies, including The Artery, McCann-Erickson, Dreamworks, and Gravity VFX/Tel Aviv. Sharabani was Lead Compositor on the 2012 film “A Late Quartet,” and was Flame Compositor on the 2008 film “Ghost Town. He also served as the On-Set Digital FX Supervisor, while working with Rhino FX, on John Sayles’s 2004 feature film, “Silver City.”

In 2015, Sharabani appeared as himself in the short documentary film interview “Art in Clubs.” He earned a Certificate as a graduate of the New York Studio School, which he attended from 1999-2003.

ABOUT THE ARTERY:

Based in New York City, The Artery is a highly regarded Art +Technology company that designs, creates and produces unique and compelling visual content across all screens. The company has established partnerships with iconic brands, ad agencies, and entertainment studios to create high profile and compelling visual content for feature films, TV programs, commercials, music videos and art installations.

Utilizing breakthrough technologies, The Artery’s uniquely talented, curated teams -- which include its Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality unit, led by Creative & Technical Director Ronen Taschum, and its Experiential arm, led by Creative Director Yaron Tsinman -- also create stunning virtual reality content, experiential brand events, and 360-degree experiences for clients around the globe. The Artery offers custom-tailored A-teams and production pipelines, focused solely on efficiently achieving outstanding results.

With its global perspective, top-tier talent, newest technologies and unlimited creative capabilities, The Artery has the proven expertise to efficiently deliver extraordinary content, branding, and multimedia experiences, worldwide.

For Further Information visit The Artery’s Social Media Sites:

Terminal 1.0

My curiosity began with an animated, vintage flashing square cursor next to the title Terminal 1.0. Terminal is an installation project at Western Front in Vancouver, Canada. The installation project examines single-user interfaces, along with how technology influences the adaptation of new artistic forms. My mini blog series will follow the four-part installation project through 2017.

Media Curator, Allison Collins has curated the project so that it occupies two available spaces, one physical and one virtual. In our email exchange Collins described the physical location, “The on-site element of the project repurposes an under-used space in the Western Front building, to deliberately offer an alternative to installing a computer into a traditional exhibition space. It allows for a single user to access an intimate experience of a work created to take place on a machine.”

bp Nichol, First Screening, 1984 Photo credit : Ben Wilson

bp Nichol, First Screening, 1984 Photo credit : Ben Wilson

I asked Collins about her specific curation methods for Terminal. She stated, “The methodology was one of pairing and contrasting the possibilities for accurately conveying artworks within those two spaces.” With these methods she considered what the project addressed, which was the user-experience of the computer. What brought together these two different spaces were both the experience of artists who utilize computers to create and the viewers of the computer-based artist works. This is how her curation methodology necessitates thinking about the virtual and physical spaces as separate experiences.

Collins has navigated the different spaces to inquire with an audience for viewing a specific work on-site and other work online. Since she curated the project in Vancouver and I reside on the East Coast of the United States, my text will present the single-user experience from online viewing. The first installation is entitled Terminal 1.0 Programmed Poetry. It considers language within the broader investigations of the overall installation project. The artist and two poets presented on the webpage utilize text, while the written format was modified from a specific technological time-period. This not only demonstrates the experimental process from the 1960’s era to now, but also offers insight to how artists and poets from the Vancouver area had a role in influencing theses specific processes.

From my singular interface experience, I immediately noticed how the curation of the digital content runs parallel with the context of the selected work. The acts of composing text, distributing and reinterpreting language can be distinguished within the curation process. I have observed this by the multimedia choices of text, audio and video. These multimedia elements refer back to Collins’ curatorial selections, made specifically for the virtual space.

terminal1_screenshot

Screen Shot of Terminal 1.0 Programmed Poetry on Western Front website October 2016

Collins’ text, Media Poetics: The Cut, The Context and The Cute, offers the viewer an opportunity to have a detailed insight that reaches beyond the technical elements of a computer-based work. The inclusion of social and cultural aspects of the artist creative process offers a broader depiction to the progression with technology, along with the impact the medium had for contemporary experimentation. The text depicts this with the work of each poet and artist.

Programmed Poetry regards the human element from the creative process with technology. In 1966 Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) was formed and was based in New York City. The first large project that E.A.T. is known for is Nine Evenings. The electrical engineer at the forefront of the movement E.A.T., Billy Kluver acknowledges, from a 1995 interview with Garnet Hertz, that from his experience with E.A.T. he recognized that involvement of artists with technology has introduced a more humanizing element with the collaborative projects. Kluver’s assessment is derived from his matching of artist’s projects with knowledge from engineers. Part of his evaluation suggests that the artists brought situations to the standards of technology that were not in an engineer’s everyday routine concerning rational problems. Kluver believes the questions raised by artists concerning the use of technology brought the engineers and the technology from that time-period closer to humanity.

Programmed Poetry examines single-user interfaces from poets and artists and their own technological knowledge rather than a specific collaboration between artist and engineer. Poet, bpNichol transformed language and the viewer’s engagement with basic code. In the early 1980’s, a period of technological evolution where computers became affordable and portable, the Apple IIe was accessible on a consumer scale. bpNichol utilized the Apple BASIC programming language to animate, communicate and distribute his twelve kinetic poems, First Screening. He extends the context of code by embedding the virtual accessibility of two of the twelve poems on a 5.25 inch floppy disc that was in an edition of 100. The viewer would have needed to be code savvy to activate the text-based digital animation with the BASIC command (RUN 1748-). Reading Collins’ text reveals the human element of bpNichol’s creative process with code, which was by placing puns and language tricks to play on the commands of the program for the curious viewer. She does acknowledge bpNichol’s perspective of handling code as a space for the invitation of user interaction.

Crossing disciplinary boundaries in the 21st Century is artist and poet Tiziana La Melia. Viewing the Eyelash and the Monochrome images on the webpage, I relate back to the concept of “the cut” with the direct collage composition of each print. The two spaces La Melia is inquiring with are from the software of Word’s virtual page and the visual art space of the image plane. The Eyelash and the Monochrome image titles that begin with (Spread 1) (Spread 2) persuade my thinking of how many variations there could be of these prints. Collins’ text and the image titles inform me that La Melia’s working progress has direct links to the computer. It comes from the input of composing text and output of printed objects. In a broader context, La Melia’s project resonates with the current single-user interface by creating the unlimited ability to reinterpret content and the various transmission methods.

screenshotterminal_lemelia

Screen Shot from Terminal 1.0 Programmed Poetry of Tiziana La Melia, The Eyelash and the Monochrome on Western Front website October 2016

My intimate viewing via the Internet had the curation structure and multimedia elements aiding in my interpretation of the time-periods and specific works. The obvious limit is being absent from the physical object or moment of experiencing the physical site of Terminal 1.0. Even though I haven’t physically seen bpNichol’s First Screening run on an Apple IIe, or stood in front of Tiziana La Melia prints, I was able to mentally engage with the physical aspects of these works by invitation of Collins’ text. I do not see that I am completely missing out on the physical site, because Programmed Poetry occupies two available spaces and I experienced the work in the virtual space. The virtual space, similar to the context of the works and the curation of Programmed Poetry, has transformed the language of experiencing installation projects.

 

REFERENCES

Collins, A. (2016) Media Poetics: The Cut, The Context and The Cute [Internet], Vancouver, Canada. Available from: http://terminal.front.bc.ca/ [Accessed September 10, 2016].

Hertz, G. (1995) The Godfather of Technology and Art: An interview with Billy Kluver [Internet], Vancouver, Canada. Available from: http://www.conceptlab.com/interviews/kluver.html [Accessed July 10, 2013].

By: Carrie Ida Edinger

Carrie’s interest with new media is in interdisciplinary methods and the use of the Internet as a presentation site for evolving contemporary projects.

The Body Electric – an Invitational Exhibition at UW Whitewater

Installation View, The Body Electric

Installation View, The Body Electric

Over the past several years I have been managing the University of Wisconsin - Whitewater Motion Capture Studio. Our space is relatively small and we use a markerless system manufactured by Organic Motion. I was drawn to the use of MOCAP in animation because it offered a different way to make things move on the screen in relation to human movement. As I learned more about what MOCAP data looks like, I started to see potential for its use beyond conventional approaches that create figurative remediated versions of captured movements. This lead me to begin using samples from our studio to animate things like cloth simulations or typographic characters.

I began formalizing some of these interests through research and then started to write about my experiences. I noticed more instances of artists and musicians working with movement data in creative and expressive directions. Along with two of my colleagues at UWW, Jeff Herriott  and Nick Hwang, I put together an invitational exhibition and music performance event at the Crossman Gallery on our campus. The show, "The Body Electric", opened on October 13 and will run until November 12 with the performances occurring in the evening of October 20.

Anna Weisling, 3D prints from MOCAP

Anna Weisling, 3D prints from MOCAP

Giselle Zatonyl "Experimental Life Institute of Kepler 45 ( station 7, test 3)"

Giselle Zatonyl "Experimental Life Institute of Kepler 45 ( station 7, test 3)"

The poem “I Sing The Body Electric”, written by Walt Whitman and published in 1885, addresses a body and soul entwined. The body is electrified through various interactions that may be both explicit and implicit. These and other themes from Whitman’s poem can be extended to our contemporary culture where the ubiquity of digital technologies is evolving to extend our bodies. Artists from wide ranging fields of experience and creative practice regularly explore the relationships between the body and its multi-faceted involvement with digitized emergence. This invitational exhibition explores some of the threads where art, technology, interactivity, music, performance, and movement cross over in 'singing the body electric'. It also investigates some of the latest technological works emerging from the studios of artists using new media and time based technologies.

Paul Hertz, prints generated through custom designed boids flocking software

Paul Hertz, prints generated through custom designed boids flocking software

Featured Artists Include: #Additivism (Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke), Jeremy Behreandt, Christopher Burns, Dylan Bernard, Maria Gillespie, Nathaniel Stern, Jeff Herriott, Paul Hertz, Nick Hwang, Dale Kaminski, Justin Lincoln, A. Bill Miller, Alex Myers, Nicholas O’Brien, Anna Weisling, Connor Yass and Giselle Zatonyl.

A. Bill Miller, "untitled (fursuit04)" animation

A. Bill Miller, "untitled (fursuit04)"

Dylan Bernard, Maria Gillespie, and Nathaniel Stern "movement, meaning, gesture"

Dylan Bernard, Maria Gillespie, and Nathaniel Stern "movement, meaning, gesture"

Justin Lincoln "Quick Cut-up" from reel of 8 videos

Justin Lincoln "Quick Cut-up" from reel of 8 videos (Paul Hertz print grouping behind)

Nicholas O'Brien,

Nicholas O'Brien, prints generated from death sequence motion captures

Alex Myers "The Body That Produced Them"

Alex Myers "The Body That Produced Them"

#Additivism "The 3D Additivist Manfesto" (Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke)

#Additivism "The 3D Additivist Manfesto" (Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke)

Special thanks to Mike Flanagan of the Crossman Gallery and his staff for accommodating the show and allowing us the space to explore this work in the context of the gallery. Additional thanks to the New Media Caucus for the support and networking opportunities that help to make exhibitions like this possible.

 

“Behind the Smart World Research Lab” at Ars Electronica 2016

For most of us consumers electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets, notebooks, printers or microwaves are a fundamental and indispensable parts of our daily lives. As a result of rapid growth and constant innovation the electronic industry is the world’s fastest growing industry. The “Internet of things” is increasingly adding electronic devices onto our shopping list. Devices that are adding up to a 24h surveillance system that are tracking every aspect of our life and are containers for private data. The life cycle of these products are considerably short and when they break we do not know how to fix them. When it is cheaper to buy a new one than to repair the old one we move on to a upgraded model. But where do these electronic devices go to die? Some of them end up in regulated e-waste centrals in Europe, yet lot of them are dumped illegally on electronic-wastelands in developing countries where they become a serious environmental threat. A privacy issue is that these devices still contain personal data that can be reanimated and abused when falling into wrong hands. In the ‘Behind the smart world’ – research lab we question what happens to our electronic waste? What environmental and privacy threats exists? And how can we become more responsible users of technology.

Since 2010 Linda Kronman and Andreas Zingerle work as the KairUs artist duo and have focused on researching topics such as spam, scam and Internet fraud. In August 2014 our research had evolved to the stage that we needed to take a field trip to West Africa, where a considerable number of so called advance fee fraud originates. Rather than hunting down scammers in Internet cafés, we were interested to see which technological affordances or limitations the scammers were faced with in this part of the world. In our initial research we came across reports about an electronic waste dump called Agbogbloshie. In the middle of Ghana’s capital Accra, in this toxic wasteland by a lagoon, is where our electronics from developed countries are illegally dumped. There we bought 22 hard drives from old desktop and laptop computers, each cost around 3-5 USD.

Talking to recyclers at the e-waste dump

Price haggling for the hard drives

Once back in Austria our plan was to recover the data from the hard drives and offer the data and the hard drives as source material for artistic production. Together with the local net&culture hosting provider called servus.at we started a research lab. 

During two DIY-data recovery sessions we accessed data from three hard drives, just by plugging them in to a computer. This means that the data on the hard drives was not even deleted. Two hard drives were recovered by trying out open source tools such as PhotoRec, TestDisc and Partition Magic. Over an extended weekend we invited the international artists Emöke Bada (Hungary), Lilian Beidler (Switzerland), Joakim Blattmann (Norway), Simon Krenn (Austria), Fabian Kühfuss (Germany), Marit Roland (Norway), Matthias Urban, (Austria), Michael Wirthig (Austria) and Pim Zwier (Netherlands) to join us in Linz for a symposium with talks by Fieke Jansen (Tactical Tech), Dr. Michael Sonntag (Data forensic, JKU Linz) and Can Sinitras (data recovery). The artists who work with various mediums such as: soundart, interactive installations, videoart, performance and data visualizations spent the rest of the weekend discussing their concepts and prototyping first ideas. In the upcoming months we broadened our research and invited artists to write about their artistic research projects that deal with the saving, deleting and resurfacing of data. The outcome is a publication that available in a printed format as well digital in various formats. The publication includes essays by Fieke Jansen (Tactical Tech), Ivar Veermäe, Emilio Vavarella, Leo Selvaggio, Marloes de Valk, Research Team “Times of Waste”, Stefan Tiefengraber, Dr. Michael Sonntag and interviews with Audrey Samson and Michaela Lakova.

Behind the Smart World – saving, deleting and resurfacing of data as part of the AMRO Research Lab 2015 edited by: Kairus.org – Linda Kronman, Andreas Zingerle, published by: servus.at | process coordinator: Us(c)hi Reiter, layout by: lafkon.net

16 artworks from the ArtLab, the publication and an open call were curated into an exhibition for the 'Art Meets Radical Openness' - festival in Linz. The festival exhibition was co-curated by KairUs and Ushi Reiter and hosted by KunstRaum Goethestrasse xtd. From this exhibition 5 artworks were selected for a presentation during the Ars Electronica festival. A new collaborative work 'Mapping the Smart World' was started with the exhibiting artists and was presented on the interactive GeoPulse system provided by Ars Electronica Solutions.

Exhibition setup at Ars Electronica 2016 - PostCity

Observations: 'Behind the Smart World' at Ars Electronica 
                                   

Our works where exhibited as part of the 'LabOratorium' exhibition organized by Ars Electronica Solutions in the huge Post City building. The electronic waste provided by Austrian recycling company Müller-Guttenbrunn Gruppe, Raphael's e-waste yantra and the rather low tech artworks stood in contrast to the techno-utopian mindset that was apparent in the Post City. We found this an excellent context to question the rather hidden, negative impact, that the 'smart world' technology has on humans and the environment. Several exhibitions in the Post City including the 'LabOratorium' had alchemists and alchemy as an overall theme asking; "Who are the alchemists of our time?" or "What is the Gold of our time?". Also the second session of the symposium (FRI 9 September 2016, 2:30PM-5:50PM) was devoted to this topic in which among others Siegfried Zielinski and Verena Kuni discussed how the ethics of the alchemist play an important role in their creations. In her presentation (AN)ALCHEMIST Verena Kuni talked about reverse-engineering the four steps in the alchemist's search of gold, and reminded us how our consumer electronics are intertwined in complex networks that includes e-waste dumping, mining, poor labor conditions, etc. This talk supported well the perspective that the 'Behind the Smart World' Lab represents in the midst of the more utopian tech dreams.  In the following discussion Zielinski disliked the (AN) in front of the word ALCHEMIST, whereas he meant that the ethical perspective always was included in the alchemist practices. If we as artists, designers, researchers, engineers are to be seen as the alchemists of our time, we should also take time to be more aware of  the consequences technology has throughout its whole life cycle. Right now there is a lot to improve. It is not just the produced waste, or the toxic conditions of urban mining in some parts of the world that needs to be concidered. Some interesting discussions raised by the audience of the 'Behind the Smart World' exhibition included observations of the ruins of 'smart cities' or concerns of the amount of waste in space, that might hinder us to actually leave this planet, as so many scenarios portray it as the final salvation of the human race.

Link to the talks: http://www.aec.at/radicalatoms/en/live/ (Siegfried Zielinski 5:15:00, Verena Kuni 5:58:30)

Exhibited works

 


 Research lab video:https://vimeo.com/182564733

"Shell performance" by Martin Reiche

"Shell performance" by Martin Reiche

‘Shell Performance’ is an open-source software art installation that transforms an operating system into a performative space. The performance is fueled by the data that is available on all attached internal storage devices. The underlying software is a Linux shell script that is constantly scanning the contents of the hard drives for files. Running on the data retrieved from one of the ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drives, ‘Shell Performance’ questions integrity of data as much as issues of privacy, highlighting the questionable relationship we have with data and our urge to save everything to protect us from potential losses through malfunctions.

"Shopimation" by Fabian Kühfuß

"Shopimation" by Fabian Kühfuß

Artistic statement: When I looked into the first restored ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drive, I realised that there was no longer a folder structure. I decided to build up a new structure and it became apparent that a lot of thumbnails had been stored on the drive. These commercial thumbnails are placeholders for the aesthetical reflection of the ‘original owner’. ‘Shopimation’ is an approach to get closer to an unknown individual by researching his or her ‘aesthetic dreams’. As the techno-imagination of Vilém Flusser is an approach of coding a function of the meaning of techno-pictures, ‘Shopimation’ could be a code to translate the very private dream of who one would like to be.

 

"Forensic fantasies" by Linda Kronman and Andreas Zingerle (KairUs)

 

‘Forensic fantasies’ is a series of three artworks dealing with data breaches of private information. In the artworks we use data that was recovered from hard-drives that were dumped in Agbogbloshie, Ghana. Reports suggest, that at this e-waste dump, criminals extract data from hard-drives to demand payments from their owners.

"Forensic fantasies" by Linda Kronman and Andreas Zingerle (KairUs)

#1 Not a blackmail:

‘Not a Blackmail’ examines the possibility to blackmail a pre-owner of a hard-drive. Besides finding data of the owner it is crucial to be able to contact the person to express ones demands. From one hard-drive we could find out who it had belonged to. The artwork consists of one package, containing the recovered data and a letter.

Photo by: by ‘tom mesic’, Creative Common by-nc-nd license

#2 Found footage stalker:

‘Found footage stalkers’ takes a closer look at images found on one of the ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drives. Scanning through the private photos enables very personal insights into the life of the pre-owners of this hard-drive. It is similar to the feeling of stalking someone unknown online, one starts to create a story to these fragmented digital representations. By presenting the photos in an album we approach the material as ‘found footage’, the practice of gathering material flea markets for remixing and creating new artworks. Hence the artwork confronts earlier practices of using ‘found footage’ with now digital materials found amongst our trash.

Photo by: Makoto Saito, Fuze.dj

#3 Identity theft:

‘Identity theft’ focuses on the phenomena of romance scamming. Scammers conduct id-theft by copying bulks of images of people to create fraudulent profiles on social media platforms. The scammers pose to be in love with their victim and after gaining their trust they lure them to give gifts and money. One of the ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drives contained several images of ladies. We suspect that the images were copied to this hard-drive to create and sustain fraudulent profiles. In this artwork 18 of the fraudulent online profiles using the same images found on the hard-drive are combined with Nollywood clips that thematises the topic of romance scams.

 

"Recycling Yantra" by Raphael Perret

The installation ‘Recycling Yantra’ is on one hand a series of videos, documenting the informal e-waste recycling in Delhi, and on the other a contemporary interpretation of the tantric symbol ‘Smara-hara Yantra’ (Remover of Desire). The videos show how computers are collected, repaired, traded and taken apart over several steps, until all components are fed back into the production of new goods again. The yantra, composed of materials collected from the recycling process, is an energy diagram, comparable with a talisman which, in its original meaning, is supposed to help people free themselves from desire and the urges of consumer culture.

Photo by: by ‘tom mesic’, Creative Common by-nc-nd license

Photo by: by ‘tom mesic’, Creative Common by-nc-nd license

"Headcrash" by Michael Wirthig

The most interesting thing of the ‘Behind the Smart World’ hard-drives is for Michael Wirthig the magnetic disc itself. It is the physical place where all kind of personal data is saved on. In former works I’ve made various studies about the relationship between inner and outer worlds. Therefore I dissected the hidden world of a number of different appliances to turn them inside out, e.g. disassembling machines. For ‘Headcrash’ I extracted the discs of 2 Ghana hard-drives and explored the surface with a microscope. 1500 photos of the inside and outside influences of the discs, like scratches or dust result in a 1 min tour de force about the inner world of these drives.

Photo by: Michael Wirthig (videostill)

Collaborative work "Mapping the smart world"

‘Mapping the Smart World’ examines the life cycles of consumer electronics and network technologies. By mapping the key locations for mining, refining, production, storage and the urban mining of e-waste we want to bring forth the complex chains of development and production that enables our networked lives. The ‘Mapping the Smart World’ reveals locations of both stunning R&D, increasingly effective use of resources as well as dystopian working conditions and ecological disasters. We were able to show a first ‘work in progress’ with the Geopulse system that Ars Electronica Solutions produced for ESA. To make the future research process more participatory, we want to port the map to an open source system and collaborate with other research groups.

 

 

Links:
KairUs Art+Research: http://www.kairus.org
servus.at: http://www.servus.at
The "Behind the smart world" publication (epub, pdf, web version): http://publications.servus.at/2016-Behind_the_Smart_World/
"Behind the smart world" research blog: http://research.radical-openness.org/2015/
Symposium II: The Alchemists of our time: http://www.aec.at/radicalatoms/en/symposium2/
Fabian Kühfuß: http://www.kuehfuss.com
Martin Reiche: http://martinreiche.com
Raphael Perret: http://raphaelperret.ch
Michael Wirthig: https://www.radical-openness.org/vortragende/michael-wirthig

This HUB Post written and submitted by Linda Kronman & Andreas Zingerle

 

Additional credits: ‘Behind the Smart World’ – a project by Linda Kronman & Andreas Zingerle (KairUs) realised the first time in cooperation with servus.at as a research lab and an exhibition for the Art Meets Radical Openness 2016 festival in Linz, Austria.

 

Material sponsoring (e-waste): MGG – Müller Guttenbrunn Group, Amstetten (Austria).

 

Fermenting at Flux: Live and Active Cultures (Part 2)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence

Over the course of my 5-month residency at Flux Factory in Long Island City, New York, I am recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers), as well as outside artists collaborating with Flux for its various public programs. Through its studio residency program, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.

For this interview, I invited Maya Jeffereis to talk about her current project, Fallout Shelter which stages a moral values exercise developed by the US Navy. Maya invited visitors to participate in the exercise at Flux Factory on July 14, as one of the featured collaborators for Interdependence DayFallout Shelter is on view at the Soho20 Gallery in Brooklyn until July 25 and the New Britain Museum of American Art through September 11. 

maya-jeffereis-fallout-shelter-2016

C: How did your Fallout Shelter project come about?
M: I found a U.S. Navy training manual at an abandoned military site in Puerto Rico. Inside was this exercise on moral values: a hypothetical apocalyptic scenario with ten people occupying a fallout shelter. As participants, you are on a civil defense committee appointed by the President and it's your job to decide which six occupants should remain in the shelter in order to rebuild society and which four have to leave, because there is only space for six. The exercise describes each occupant by very problematic statements that include information about age, race, gender, sexuality, profession, and ideology.

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Text taken from the fallout shelter exercise:

  1. Thirty-six year old female physician, known to be a confirmed racist.
  2. Marine drill instructor, 37, white, accused of brutality to recruits -- has a revolver.
  3. Black militant, 35 year old biological researcher (PhD).
  4. Biochemist, 62 years old, white male.
  5. Olympic athlete, 26, decathlon champion, Asian female.
  6. Hollywood starlet, 27 year old white female, known drug user.
  7. Third year male medical student -- homosexual, 28.
  8. Sixteen year old girl, pregnant, questionable IQ, high school dropout.
  9. Thirty year old Catholic priest, Hispanic.
  10. Thirty-eight year old carpenter, and “Mr. Fix-It” man. Served seven years for pushing narcotics, has been out of jail for 7 months.

C: How did you take the ideas from that document and transform them into a work?
M: The most interesting aspect of the exercise was the conversation about identity politics and values that it opened up. I invited participants to my studio to complete the exercise and make their own decisions about whom to keep and whom to remove. They improvised on camera playing three roles: a member of the civil defense committee discussing their decisions, an occupant they chose to keep, and an occupant they chose to get rid of. In the role of the fallout shelter occupants, they would make a video confessional speech about why they should remain in the shelter, with the idea that their speech would be sent to the civil defense committee making decisions.

C: How does the two-channel format influence our understanding of the content in the speeches?
M: The video is edited together with the civil defense committee members on the left channel and the fallout shelter occupants on the right. By having the same performer play three distinct roles, you get a conflict of interest. For example, you might see a member of the civil defense committee on the left talking about why we should get rid of the Hollywood Starlet but then on the right, you see the same performer making an argument in defense of herself. Many different performers play each of the occupants, so you might see 10 different performers playing the role of the Marine Drill Instructor. I wanted to create a collective identity for each of the 10 occupants that would represent the range of arguments for or against each occupant. This would expose latent biases, because you're having a very direct and open conversation about race and identity politics and your own values. You are also building your own conception of a utopia by doing this thought experiment of what it would mean to rebuild society. What kind of society are you building? What do you hope to bring to a new society and what do you wish to leave behind?

C: How many people participated and did they write their own scripts?
M: About 35 people participated in the video and all of the performers improvised their own parts. When directing the video, I offered some general guidelines but tried not to influence what they said because it was about what each person brought to their own performance.

C: You don’t guide them as to whether they should use their own value system or approach it like a philosophical exercise?
M: I’m interested in this gray area between the performance of the self and the performance of a character. Where do you draw the line between the two? When performing a character, you are calling on personal experiences and external experiences that you have observed or absorbed through culture and media and these experiences become internalized. When performing your own identity, I think of Erving Goffman’s research on how an individual acts differently in different contexts, constantly adapting to various situations. The question of real versus fictional can be asked of both the performer and the performed.

C: In reading the document, there is an absurdity to the exercise that makes it hard to take seriously, but there is something about watching people act it out that feels surreal and frightening in its plausibility.
M: I think of the occupants of the fallout shelter as archetypes: you have The Doctor, The Soldier, the Academic, The Athlete, The Movie Star, and so on. Each archetype may have varying degrees of relatability, depending on your own background. For example, the Female Physician is described as a “confirmed racist.” How do we interpret this information, especially when it seems to present a conflict of interest between a doctor who swears the Hippocratic Oath and a confirmed racist who may refuse to treat certain patients? When the participants play the occupants, they begin to humanize these characters, giving insight into their personalities, their flaws, and their motivations. Perhaps it’s this sense of empathy imbued in the performance or conveyed to the viewer that is unsettling, because we’re confronting morally ambiguous and ambivalent issues. But that’s the great thing about this thought experiment: it gets us to have very frank and candid discussions about difficult topics, like race, policing, and gun control--issues that we’re facing right at this very moment.

Maya Jeffereis is a video, performance, and installation artist based in New York. Her work has been shown most recently at SOHO20 Gallery, Flux Factory, and NARS Foundation. She holds a MFA from Hunter College and a BFA and BA from the University of Washington. Maya is also the Public Engagement Associate of Adult and Access Programs at the Guggenheim.

Christina Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Haverford College in Pennsylvania and currently an artist-in-residence at Flux Factory in New York.

 

Fermenting at Flux: Live & Active Cultures (Part 1)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence

Over the course of my 5-month residency at Flux Factory I will be recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers). Through its studio residency program in Long Island City, NY, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.  The next exhibition opening on July 20th in Flux's gallery is "Thinking Like a Machine," by Niki Passath.

Interview with Niki Passath

_MG_9897

 

C: Tell me about your opening on July 20th.

N: It’s a hybrid event, both workshop and exhibition. The robotics workshop starts at noon and finishes when the opening reception begins, at 6pm. We will experiment with the machines we have made as a performance during the opening.

_MG_9919

C: What are the materials you are using?

N: Styrofoam, wooden skewers, straws, mobile phone batteries, and e-waste.

[Recently Niki has been making robots that paint]

C: How do you see the action of the robot painting as cultural critique?

N: I propose new ways for looking at technology.  For example, a lot of people think, you can do anything with a good programming language. In reality, you are limited to what the producer of that language could conceptualize.

C: The robot acts as an intermediary, creating distance between you and the final painting. I assume you are thinking about technology mediating relationships and how we connect emotionally or disconnect.

N:  How we communicate and use technology nowadays, is the wrong way because we connect, mainly over software which has a reason. That reason is to make money. It might be a social software but the intention is different. There used to be couch surfing for free. The next idea was Airbnb, which was a good idea, but businesses were destroyed and in many cities the rents have increased.

C: It points to a global issue, of prioritizing short term consumer experience over long term sustainability.

N: It’s subjectivism, vs objectivism. The idea that everything that I would like to have and consume is inherently good.

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C: The lines these days are a bit blurred, but a lack of specific function is often inherent to what defines art, as opposed to design or craft. How do you think about the function of your robots? Aren’t they unnecessary?

N: I come from the classical music world. An instrument is a very elaborate technological device. Even when you use that machine to create music, you interpret the composition. The musician, is a very small element in the whole system. There could be a billion musicians, but the way they interpret the work is special.

C: The point is not to make a painting.

N: I tried it, it’s not something that I like. I really enjoy the traces of the robots, they take two to three hours. It might be the same amount of time for me to make it myself, but I prefer if the robot makes it. It’s a very intense, emotional time for me. The reason for having the robots paint, is the connection to the idea of trace and cave painting. Everything the robots do is recorded by the trace, it is the abstract form of each robot's movement.

C: You create the robots with some intentional element of failure?

N: Yes, I realized that if there are small mistakes in the form, the behavior changes and it becomes very lifelike. My theory is that every great idea came out of a misunderstanding of something.

C: Are you open about the code and the technical process?

N: I come out of the open source world. If you look at the score for a piece of music, that is the source code of the piece. In some cases, I write code onto the gallery wall. Calling it a score can help you see code differently. It’s more interesting to create scores for machines, than a very dry, technical code.

Niki_paint_robot2

C: The world of technology is still very male dominated, and your robots are working with the abstract expressionist language, which is also a male dominated language. Specifically this idea of the paintbrush as phallus is a reminder of this.

N: I’m looking forward to the conversation here in the United States, because Jackson Pollock is not so important in my world and I’m not coming out of that tradition. I was never a painter. I’m interested in the gesture, but not what a painter thinks is a gesture.

C: Your work reminds me of Yves Klein, with the traces of  bodies on canvas, performance in the gallery space, musical scores, neo-dada style happenings; also Nam June Paik releasing a robot into the street to be hit by a car.  It’s an event, alive and organic.

N: There’s no instructions for the evening. If you don’t look closely it would seem like a normal opening reception, with the artist present. It’s more subtle and I wouldn’t want it to be otherwise.

Niki Passath teaches Interface Design at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Christina Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Haverford College in Pennsylvania. Both are currently artists-in-residence at Flux Factory in New York, where Niki will be leading a robotics workshop on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, followed by an opening reception and exhibition: http://www.fluxfactory.org/events/robot-making-workshop/

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A Normal Future – Interview with NORMALS

Normals is a collective whose work crosses a number of boundaries. Perhaps their work is a proposal that the boundaries we once found useful in defining creative practice don’t work as well in our connected/networked/hybrid cultures. What do the spaces between design, digital studio practice, networked art, and Internet Art look like? What do the spaces between fiction, abstraction, and social media performance look like? What do the spaces between the real, the virtual, and the augmented look like? It isn’t easy to define through traditional categories what artists create in our contemporary visual culture more broadly and definitely challenging with the work of Normals in particular.
I met Normals in 2012 at the 2nd International Computer Art Congress in Paris, where their physical bodies live and work. Since that time they have continued to produce multifaceted speculative works of multiple disciplinary categories. In the past several months, they have been promoting a new work - APPAREL. Our interview focuses on that work but is ongoing.
# Hi Normals - for our readers not familiar with your work, tell us about APPAREL. The work has a number of parts - how do they fit together?
APPAREL is a piece of clothing designed to co-exist in the digital and physical spaces. It comes as a polygonal black cape, and an iOS application allowing the wearer to see the piece’s digital counterpart, in augmented reality. The cape itself is as minimalistic as its digital overlay is complex and refined. The digital model is generated through a text analysis of the wearer's Twitter feed, evolving in real time, and creates a unique piece of clothing, as an info-graphic, an incarnation of the wearer's online personality.
Being a speculative studio working on anticipation, we like to imagine what a world where our “products” are widespread would look like, and for that specific reason we tend to pair our projects with loads of fiction, describing hypothetical users, and their relationship to theses objects in a future where they have become… well… normal. So, for APPAREL, not only did we make a functional product (with the coding help of Julien “V3ga” Gachadoat), but we also imagined a future fashion show, a fashion contest, in which everybody wears an Apparel and competes over their digital personalities.
This has been the subject to a short story, a video depicting one of the contestants (3PLUS3MAKE5), a soundtrack generated from the contestants’ profiles, and a faux-documentary depicting fashion’s transfer over to the digital realm.
The work is speculative, but it is also about things that are currently happening and developing in Arts/Tech environments.  What do you think are some of the more interesting directions in creative culture today?
Everything speculative is about something currently happening! Honestly, there are many interesting aspects to the evolution of arts, tech, and fashion, but we decided to focus on one question that has driven the entire project: “what would our clothes look like if they became digital?” Considering AR as a potential technology to display a data-based esthetic layer over physical things, it seemed obvious that all things esthetic would transit to this reactive and polymorphous layer of contextual information. On the other hand, the physical piece of clothing had to be reduced to a simple protective piece of fabric, a pedestal for its glorious digital overlay.
But to answer your question, we feel anything can be interesting as long as it doesn’t fall into the trap of “fascination.” The role of artists, designers, or “futurists” is to look at what tomorrow might bring without being so fascinated by their subject that they transform critical thinking into wishful thinking without even knowing it. “What will [insert something] look like in the future?” is always a valid question, as long as the answer isn’t “flying cars” or “eternal life.” No one should look at innovation as something purely good or purely bad: whatever’s interesting lies in the middle.
APPAREL had/has a number of contestants - Users creating and sharing their fashion/design - what are some of your favorites?
We love them all! When imagining a product or an object, it’s always extremely fun to imagine the people interacting with it, whether it is as “hackers” of the system, or people full of admiration for the “progress” it stands for, it is one of the main focuses of our practice: imaginary users for speculative objects.
All the characters described in the story are representative of  an “attitude” towards digital fashion: the main character, Abdlcroco, is a competitor who only runs after achievements, while Mangel is seeking for the perfect performance, and 3PLUS3MAKE5 cultivates eye-candies to satisfy her audience’s craving for fun and cute things. Duall is probably the most intriguing character though, being someone who doesn’t care about this fashion contest, but comes to watch it every day, and is, despite his efforts to make people believe he doesn’t care, part of this system too.
A question for one of the contestants - is AbdlCroco available? 
He is.
Screen Shot 2016-04-18 at 10.11.32 AM
AbdlCroco - you used to be one of the top ranked contestants - tell our readers about one of your most highly rated designs - what was it like? What did the crowd think?
What I do is very personal. Whatever I feel like on the moment, I just turn it into a situational dance that spits epileptic graphics right into the viewer’s ‘i’. But if I have to chose one… I’d say back when I was Number Six or something. There was this one time… See, I made these bunky prisms that would go boom-boom-boom in your face as the bass in the soundtrack — the most epic collection of the deepest, darkest, fattest bass samples you could find on the Stream — also went boom-boom-boom. Even the floor looked like it was shaking, with all the lines blinking up and down looted from SK000N’s template — you know the one I’m talking about, right? So I had all this set up, and as I stepped on stage, there was some kind of power shutdown or something, and all the lights went out, and it was so in sync with my show that every frenz thought it was all planned. But truly it wasn’t. Just got lucky. And frenz digged my stuff so hard they remained silent throughout the whole thing, and I even got a standing ovation — well, the “standing” part doesn’t count though, everyone was standing already. But still got an ovation. That one was the best. Got straight to number 4 after that. But that was another time…
AbdlCroco - what do you think of Mangel’s fashion? His work seems to be on top lately - what does the crowd like about Mangel?
Allow me to speak frankly: Mangel’s a joke! Every single day Trudent welcomes a fashion show, with rules, RULES — you are judged on your LOOKS. The performance has now become a part of the show, and I’m okay with that: you should be able to display your outfit in the best manner possible. But what I HATE is frenz who use the performance to go hypno on the audience, to a point where they’re not even looking at the ONLY thing they should be looking at. Mangel’s just a comedian, he acts, makes people laugh, but no one sees that he just copies everyone else, and never comes up with ANYTHING NEW. Yet people like him, so they vote for him, and he remains there, everyday, trolling his way to the top.
 Normals - Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts with us, we look forward to seeing what happens next!

Modular Software: Creating Performative Tools for Artists

Over the past two years, I have become increasingly interested in the rich potential of working with hybrid analog and digital systems for real time performative processing. There is an interesting tension that occurs when combining the precision of digital with the unpredictability of analog. I used a hybrid setup for my recent performance Multiplying Muybridge where I used an analog synthesizer to create live sound that was manipulated by a theremin-like depth sensor that outputs control voltage to the system. This instrument, along with a handful of oscillators, are digitized in MIDI and used to generate patterns in Processing. Those patterns are then sent to Max via Syphon to chromakey 6 separate videos into the patterns. Each of the three patterns can be controlled via a USB MIDI controller, two knobs for each X and Y direction. I use OSC (Open Sound Control) to pass that from MAX to Processing.

Why describe this in such detail? I am interested in the notion of open modular systems of making hybrid works. Philosophically, this tool creation and workflow is inspired by the design sensibilities of analog video synthesizers created in the 1970’s by toolmakers such as Dan Sandin, Bill Hearn and Dave Jones. The relationship that these systems had with control voltage interfaces for maximum variability stands in stark contrast to many of the professional software packages used today.

In December 2015, my friend and fellow artist Jason Bernagozzi, started a collaboration to develop software tools for time-based media artists as a way to support the fundraising efforts of Signal Culture. We wanted to make software inspired by the open systems of these early video pioneers and philosophically grounded in modularity. We are interested in creating tools that are real time, performative, modular, and exploratory. The first app Jason and I wanted to work on was a process inspired by the classic Frame Buffer created by legendary toolmaker Dave Jones of Dave Jones Design, who has made significant contributions to the history of video art. The Frame Buffer application saves a series of video frames into memory that repeat over one another within the keyed areas of either a lumakey or a chromakey. The process is simple, however, what we wanted to focus on was how to make the application able to be controlled by a wide range of sources.

The first thing we created was the capability to ingest a wide range of video sources, such as web cameras, external cameras (via fierwire or thunderbolt), QuickTime movie files, and to or from syphon. We designed it to cover a wide range of possible resolutions from Classic Frame Buffer 256 x 256 all the way to 1920 x 1080 HD. You can also control the frame rate of the video output, which can be sent out to external devices, recorded to a QuickTime, syphoned out to another software application, or be full-screened to be used for a performance. As far as the process itself, we wanted it to be intuitive for the user, which makes for a difficult balance of fine tuning and narrowing down parameter ranges without making it so limiting that it acts like a filter you would apply in a nonlinear editing or compositing program.

There are seven parameters that can be explored in the app. Being concerned with performability, we made it so all the parameters could be controlled via MIDI or OSC. The user could have an analog synth control the parameters, hook in a CV->MIDI interface or use an OSC touch interface on your phone control the app, making it able to run video and control between several software packages such as Ableton Live, VDMX, Processing, etc all in real time.

We released the Frame Buffer app in January 2016 as a part of Signal Culture’s sustainability fundraising campaign. Signal Culture is a nonprofit experimental media art organization offering residencies, resources, and exhibition opportunities. The Frame Buffer is the first of six applications we have planed for 2016. Check out the Signal Culture App club for more details. The exciting part of making these tools is seeing what artists make with them. I want to share two works by artists that have used the Frame Buffer in their new works, “Negative Vibes/////Rough Idol” by Patrick James Cain, a sound and video artist residing in Washington D.C., and “Mix Buffer” by Alan Powell, a Video Artist and Associate Professor at Arcadia University.

“Negative Vibes/////Rough Idol”, Patrick James Cain, 2016 Image courtesy of the Artist

Negative Vibes/////Rough Idol”, Patrick James Cain, 2016. Image courtesy of the Artist

“Mix Buffer”, Alan Powell, 2016 Image courtesy of the Artist

Mix Buffer”, Alan Powell, 2016. Image courtesy of the Artist

Jason and I are now finalizing our second app titled Maelstrom, which was based on a process I developed for a 2012 project “Life in the Maelstrom”. Maelstrom combines real time lumakeying and pixel sorting paired with digital feedback to create repetitions into infinity. The app allows the user to control the direction of the feedback, zoom in and out, and rotate the angle of each repetition in space. During the development process of Maelstrom, I created a new performance titled “Synaptic Transmissions.” Working with the app in relation to audio visual performance led us to new ideas for future apps, in particular methods that would help create audiovisual sync. A simple example of this would be to use frame difference and Image brightness average for MIDI or OSC output.

We are not alone in developing creative tools for artists. There is an exciting renaissance of artists and toolmakers sharing and creating tools. Our goals are pedagogical in nature, to think about process versus effects. An effect is meant as an illusion, a real time process however can be used to articulate new visual and aural metaphors that come out of discovery and a relationship between the artist and their tools. In many ways this connects real time media production to music. It is not the inherent sound of the instrument that is significant, it is the choices the artist makes that creates the melody.

By: Eric Souther, New Media Artist, Assistant Professor of New Media at Indiana University South Bend

 

FEBRUARY 2016 ARRAYLIST THEME: Performance [experimental, durational, networked] –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

We are happy to announce the upcoming ArrayList discussion theme:
Performance [experimental, durational, networked]
starts February 1, 2016

ArrayList series details here: http://arrayproject.com/content/discussion

Subscribe here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist

The purpose of the ArrayList year-long series is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). For those new to the listserv format, a listserv is an archived asynchronous thread of email conversation. Subscribe to the listserv so that you can read [fly-on-the-wall is a-ok AKA lurking] and/or respond to the written activity, and read the archives. As always we hope to engage a wide range of critical perspectives so please chime in with thoughts and questions. Sincerely, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY[ ] founders

Performance [experimental, durational, networked]:
with guest thread leaders: Thomas Albrech, Amy Alexander, L[3]^2 (Lee Blalock), Ricardo Dominguez, Kirsten Leenaars, Ellen Mueller, Heather Warren-Crow, Jorge Rojas, Angela Washko

Thomas Albrecht (State University of New York at New Paltz)
Thomas Albrecht’s performance projects have explored ritual and language in public spaces, galleries, and museums, prodding cultural beliefs and individual doubts. Current interests involve duration and elements of Absurdist Theatre, laying bare contingency in human constructions and slippage between truth and fiction. Albrecht has performed throughout the United States and internationally, notably at Grace Exhibition Space, Defibrillator Performance Art Gallery, Panoply Performance Laboratory, Dimanche Rouge Paris, the Queens Museum, and during festivals such as the Brooklyn International Performing Arts Festival, Month of Performance Art Berlin, and Performatorio, IV Muestra de Arte Duracional in the Dominican Republic. He received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, a Master of Arts in Religion from Yale University where he served as the Menil Scholar in residence, and his MFA from the University of Washington. He serves as Assistant Dean in the School of Fine & Performing Arts, and Associate Professor in the Art Department at the State University of New York at New Paltz.

Amy Alexander (University of California, San Diego)
Amy Alexander is a digital media, audiovisual and performance artist who has also worked in film, video, music, tactical media and information technology. She has been making films since 1990 and creating art through programming since 1994. Much of Alexander’s work is performance-­based, often working at intersections of cinema, performing arts, humor, politics, and popular culture. Her current research and practice focuses on expanded approaches to the moving image that reflect contemporary cultural and technological shifts. Alexander has performed and exhibited internationally in clubs and on the street as well as in festivals, museums and on the Internet. She has written and lectured on software art, software as culture, and audiovisual performance, and she has served as a reviewer for festivals and commissions for digital media art, video, and computer music. She was a founding organizer of the runme.org software repository, and she has done residencies at The Media Centre in Huddersfield, UK, and the iota Center in Los Angeles. She is an Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego. More information at: http://amy-alexander.com

L[3]^2 (Lee Blalock) (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
Lee Blalock is an artist who considers what it may mean to live in a future somewhere between here and nowhere. Her research began when she was a kid and would visit her father at his job as a computer programmer / operator. Rules and systems are inherent to her process, while her imagination leans toward the N3w Hum4n. Lee uses her work to create new origin stories, visual or written, which are influenced by a life long interest in speculative fiction and science fiction. Having moved fluidly from an undergraduate STEM education to a career in design and production, she eventually found that all of her conceptual and technical interests converge in the fine arts. The artist makes work using text, performance, computational video and sound, electronics and drawing. Many ideas behind Lee's work attempts to describe the future human, replacing the failed language around identity with the self-constructed and amplified self. This new body (or "NeueBody") often takes the form of abstraction and presents a mix of algorithmic and heuristic behavior. In all cases, Lee's work represents the physical, computational, or behavioral body and uses repetition as a strategy to move past the automatic and into something transformative. As an arts educator, Lee's research is specific to topics referring to the posthuman, systems and cybernetics. She received her Bachelor of Science (Chemistry and Math) from Spelman College and an Associates of Arts (Design) from Bauder College. In 2011, Lee received her Master of Fine Arts from The School of the Art Institute, where she currently teaches in multiple departments. Lee writes and performs under the alphanumeric moniker of L[e]^2. She can be found walking a tightrope in the center of a holographic sphere.

Ricardo Dominguez (University of California, San Diego)
Ricardo Dominguez is a co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group who developed virtual sit-in technologies in solidarity with the Zapatistas communities in Chiapas, Mexico, in 1998. His recent Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab project ( http://bang.transreal.org/) with Brett Stalbaum, Micha Cardenas, Amy Sara Carroll, and Elle Mehrmand, the Transborder Immigrant Tool (a GPS cell phone safety net tool for crossing the Mexico/US border) was the winner of “Transnational Communities Award” (2008), an award funded by Cultural Contact, Endowment for Culture Mexico–US and handed out by the US Embassy in Mexico. It also was funded by CALIT2 and the UCSD Center for the Humanities. The Transborder Immigrant Tool has been exhibited at the 2010 California Biennial (OCMA), Toronto Free Gallery, Canada (2011), The Van Abbemuseum, Netherlands (2013), ZKM, Germany (2013), as well as a number of other national and international venues. The project was also under investigation by the US Congress in 2009-2010 and was reviewed by Glenn Beck in 2010 as a gesture that potentially “dissolved” the U.S. border with its poetry. Dominguez is an associate professor at the University of California, San Diego, in the Visual Arts Department, a Hellman Fellow, and Principal/Principle Investigator at CALIT2 and the Performative Nano-Robotics Lab at SME, UCSD. He also is co-founder of *particle group*, with artists Diane Ludin, Nina Waisman, Amy Sara Carroll, whose art project about nano-toxicology entitled *Particles of Interest: Tales of the Matter Market* has been presented at the House of World Cultures, Berlin (2007), the San Diego Museum of Art (2008), Oi Futuro, Brazil (2008), CAL NanoSystems Institute, UCLA (2009), Medialab-Prado, Madrid (2009), E-Poetry Festival, Barcelona, Spain (2009), Nanosférica, NYU (2010), and SOMA, Mexico City, Mexico (2012): http://hemisphericinstitute.org/hemi/en/particle-group-intro.

Kirsten Leenaars (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
Kirsten Leenaars’ creates participatory video and performance based work. In her practice Leenaars engages with specific people and communities. Her work oscillates between fiction and documentation, reinterprets personal stories and reimagines everyday realities through staging, improvisation and iteration. She examines the very nature of our own constructed realities, the stories we tell our selves and the ones we identify with and explores the way we relate to others. Recent projects include producing a series of 3 performances Notes on Empty Chairs, about loss, community and empathy for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago; creating the video #thisistomorrow with Washington DC based performers in response to the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner; and producing the science fiction film: The Invasion of the Hairy Blobs, currently edited at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, amongst others at: Museo Universitaro del Chopo, Mexico City, DCAC, Washington DC, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Glass Curtain Gallery, Threewalls, Gallery 400, 6018 North, and Elaine L. Jacob Gallery, Detroit, Printed Matter, New York, the Wexner Center, Columbus, and at the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, Kunst Fabrik, Munchen, and Bethanien Haus, Berlin. She has been rewarded grants from the Mondrian Foundation, The Propeller Fund, the department of Culturall Affairs, Chicago, the Dutch Art Foundation and multiple cultural grants from the Dutch Consulate in New York.

Ellen Mueller (West Virginia Wesleyan College)
Exhibiting works nationally and internationally, Ellen Mueller explores hyperactive news media and corporate management systems via work in a variety of media including, but not limited to, performance, 3D printing, and drawing. Recent residencies include Ox-Bow, Virginia Center for Creative Art where she was a Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation Creative Fellow, Nes Artist Residency (Iceland), Coast Time (May 2016), and Signal Culture (August 2016). Mueller currently lives and works in Buckhannon WV as an Assistant Professor of Art at West Virginia Wesleyan College. She received her MFA in Studio Art from University of South Florida. She completed a BA in Theatre and Art, and a BS in Design Technology from Bemidji State University. Additionally, she has obtained performance training at Dell'Arte International and the Brave New Institute (now known as the Brave New Workshop Student Union). Mueller is contracted with Oxford University Press to publish a foundational art textbook entitled "Elements and Principles of 4D Art and Design", due out February 2016.

Heather Warren-Crow (Texas Tech University)
Heather Warren-Crow, assistant professor of interdisciplinary arts and affiliated faculty in women's studies, is a scholar of media and performance as well as an artist. Her interdisciplinary scholarship centers on the aesthetics of subjectivity in the 19th-21st centuries. She has given sustained attention to the body in analog and digital animation, discourses of adolescence in fine art and popular media, the art of affective labor, and the agency of objects, images, and sounds. Dr. Warren-Crow's first book, Girlhood and the Plastic Image, was recently published by Dartmouth College Press. Dr. Warren-Crow's teaching interests span music, theatre, dance, film, and visual art. She has areas of expertise in intermedia (especially performance art, sound art, and screendance); puppetry, movement-based, and multimedia performance; theatrical design; video and internet art; photography theory; performance studies; cinema and media studies; girlhood studies; gender studies; and vocal aesthetics.

Jorge Rojas (Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City)
Born in Morelos, Mexico, Jorge Rojas is a multidisciplinary artist, curator, and art educator. He studied Art at the University of Utah and at Bellas Artes in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. His work and curatorial projects have been exhibited across the US and internationally, including Museo del Barrio, Queens Museum of Art, White Box, and Grace Exhibition Space in New York; Museum of Latin American Art, The Mexican Museum, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, and MACLA in California; Project Row Houses and New World Museum in Houston; Diaspora Vibe Gallery in Miami; Utah Museum of Fine Arts and Utah Museum of Contemporary Art in Salt Lake City; Ex Convento del Carmen in Guadalajara; and FOFA Gallery in Montreal. He has received grants and fellowships from National Performance Network, Experimental Television Center, and Vermont Studio Center. He is the Founding Director of Low Lives, an international, multi-venue live streaming performance festival that was founded in 2009. Rojas is director of education and engagement at the UMFA in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Angela Washko (Carnegie Mellon University)
Angela Washko is an artist, writer and facilitator devoted to creating new forums for discussions of feminism in the spaces most hostile toward it. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Since 2012, Washko has operated as The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft - an ongoing intervention on communal language formation inside the most popular massively multi-player online role playing game of all time. A recent recipient of The Frank-Ratchye Fund for Art at the Frontier Grant from the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, a Franklin Furnace Performance Fund Grant, a Creative Time Report commission, a Rhizome Internet Art Microgrant, a Danish International Visiting Artist Grant and the Terminal Award, Washko’s practice has been highlighted in Art in America, Frieze Magazine, Time Magazine, The Guardian (UK), ArtForum, ARTnews, VICE, Hyperallergic, Rhizome, the New York Times, The Creator’s Project, Dazed and Confused Magazine, Digicult, ArtInfo, Bad At Sports and more. Her projects have been presented nationally and internationally at venues including Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art (Helsinki, Finland), Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, Moving Image Art Fair (London and NYC), the Rotterdam International Film Festival, Institute for Contemporary Art Boston and Bitforms Gallery in NYC. Washko’s work is featured in the recently published book “Mass Effect: Art and the Internet in the 21st Century” from The New Museum and MIT Press.

The Illusions of Love Stories

Artist Nichola Kinch is bringing back the physicality of images with her participatory installations. A mix of 19th and 21st century image making methods as well as her consideration of the exhibition space provides a captivating viewing experience.

The installation Love Stories is being exhibited at Fleisher Art Memorial located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA from December 4, 2015 thru January 30, 2016. Nichola is a Philadelphia artist and her work has been chosen to be included in Fleischer’s 38th Annual Wind Challenge Exhibition Series.

My first reaction from experiencing Love Stories is how the illusion of two- dimensional images is perceived in the physical space, which is a traditional gallery space. Multiples of digitally printed trees are what visually command the space. The heavy bark texture on the trees is one of the illusions that drew me into the space, with the discovery that the trees were flat. Nichola views this as the tension between fiction and reality for these images to form a narrative.

In the process of arranging the installation, Nichola considers the arrangement of the space as a theatrical stage set. Within this arrangement there is an opportunity for the viewer to engage in the act of discovery and the sense of wonderment by wandering through the placement of the trees and discovering the viewing machines.

The overall arrangement of the installation in relation to the viewing machines is derived from aspects of Nichola’s research of early photographic production and Victorian era image production. In my conversation with Nichola about her research, she referred to the Richard Balzer Collection of Victorian era visual entertainment. From this collection, she mentioned the range of her extensive investigations of pre-photographic methods. This range of image production is taken from the multiple layers of the dioramas and peep shows that influence the illusion of the perception of depth as it pertains to a visual scene.

This research is not only seen in the arrangement of the installation as a whole, but also in how these Victorian era optical toys and devices had a physicality to the control and limits of the viewers’ visual perception. Free Birds is an example of one of the two viewing devices that is included in Love Stories. Silhouettes of birds are projected on the far wall of the gallery from an overhead projector. Upon closer examination of the overhead projector, there is an inviting manual crank for the viewer to participate in the flight of the projected flock of birds. As I cranked the digitally printed lenticular animation on acetate I was producing the backdrop of the installation. My time spent animating the flock of birds was used in the beginning by grasping the idea of speed variations in which I could crank the handle of the overhead projector. Once I felt comfortable with the manual aspects my mind wandered to memories of viewing geese in the sky from a distance. My experience with Free Birds is significant to the description of specific physicality of a viewing device, along with the process of producing and consuming images within the installation.

While Nichola does use 19th and 21st century image making methods to form her artwork, these two centuries are intertwined with how the viewer considers the engagement and the pace of the experience of viewing images. These viewing machines are in contrast to how current images are produced with various digital devices and instantly consumed when presented on social media sites. Nichola states, “In direct response to this phenomenon, I have become particularly interested in the moments in which we, as viewers, become tangibly aware of image as a mediated production.”

The video that accompanies this blog post is intended to translate the experience of the installation, Love Stories, at the Fleisher Art Memorial, while including the voice of the artist, Nichola Kinch, depicting her research and making within the creative process of these specific installation pieces.

By: Carrie Ida Edinger

Carrie's interest with new media is in interdisciplinary methods and the use of the Internet as a presentation site for evolving contemporary projects.

The Wrong

still from "The Noise of the City" by Alexander Antipin

still from "The Noise of the City" by Alexander Antipin

The Wrong is big. Really ridiculously, absurdly large. The sheer number and variety of works encompassed in this digital biennial is overwhelming, across its pavilions, curated pieces, and events. When this second iteration of The Wrong was about to launch, even organizer Guillo had not yet seen every work. The scale is mostly a positive thing -- as someone fairly immersed in new media and net art, I found many pavilions filled with unfamiliar artists -- it was great to break out of the digital art I'm exposed to through social media into currents of work that are farther afield. On the downside, the site offers little in the ways of an entry point, which can create a barrier for those not already knowledgeable about net art. It is easy to follow links from the Wrong into Facebook groups that no longer have content posted, or to 404s, or pages which ask you install questionable software locally.  My guess is that most people will end up entering The Wrong from pavilions or artworks by people they know, which somewhat defeats the purpose -- my favorite works were mostly those that I found accidentally.

The strongest pavilions tend to have the more specific themes. A stand-out for me is  www.not-found-exhibition.com (curated by Cesar Escudero Andaluz and Mario Santamaría), a selection of netartworks no longer found online, at least not in their original locations. Rather than netart that is intentionally ephemeral, these are works that have died a natural online death; either consciously taken down, or simply moved when sites are updated or retooled. It reminds me of Curt Cloninger's Pantry War, recently killed by Rhizome's redesign (which invalidated its own comment markup language). In this work, Curt paired opposing images, posted inline from other sites, as a contest to see which would outlast the other -- for instance a magic marker vs an eraser.

Some of the works in Not Found Exhibition can still be found rather easily in web searches -- but the strength of the pavilion lies in how intriguing the written descriptions of the works are. The minimal design does not interfere with the descriptions: big blue classic HTML style links, lots of monospaced type giving it a library feel, wiki-media-style markup for the title, and plenty of whitespace to keep it uncluttered.

DiMoDa, exterior view

The DiMoDa (the Digital Museum of Digital Art) pavilion took an almost opposite approach, building a virtual 3D environment filled with immersive works. At DiMoDa (designed by Alfredo Salazar-Caro and William James Richard Robertson), it is always sunset. It feels like a place found by accident; the loneliness of the space, with the insect sounds which follow you into the museum. It capitalizes on the airless VRML-quality of Unity, reflecting on the feel of the institution. The museum itself is beautifully designed, juxtaposing classical and contemporary architectural styles familiar from current trends but taken further, just barely within the realm of what's realistically possible architecturally. Inside are four digital art installations, by Claudia Hart, Tim Berresheim,​ Jacolby Satterwhite​, and my favorite election prediction by Salvador Loza and Gibrann Morgado (it involves Sarah Palin, Donald Trump, and a tumorous horse-like thing). Each installation feels distinct from the others and from the museum itself, and sometimes change the physical laws. At one point, I got rickrolled, so there is at least one Easter Egg, possibly more (you'll have to find where on your own 🙂 ).

Apart from the pavilions, there are also featured artworks, such as Jan Robert Leegte's Random Selections Object. Here, the rectangles of spectral Photoshop ants are the content, against a black backdrop. In very dense groupings of selections, the clusters of digital ants appear to walk in two directions at once. It continues Leegte's experiments with the materiality of digital artist's immaterial tools.

The Wrong (again) can be found at http://thewrong.org/. It officially runs from Nov 1 to Jan 31, 2016. More content, including events, will continue to appear throughout the exhibition.

[Full Disclosure: I participated in the Wrong within the UnnamedGroup pavilion]

Looking forward::: DECEMBER 2015 ARRAYLIST THEME: GAMES! –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

ARRAY [ ] // www.arrayproject.com

We are happy to announce the upcoming ArrayList discussion theme: New Media Foundations: Games! --> starts December 1, 2015

DECEMBER 2015 GUEST THREAD LEADERS::::

Theresa Devine (New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University; Phoenix)
Theresa Devine is an Assistant Professor in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. Theresa received her BFA in Painting and Printmaking at Texas A & M University - Corpus Christi in 1991 and her MFA in Painting at University of Houston in 1994. In her personal artwork she explores the intersection of adversity and play in the media of toys and games. http://theresadevine.com/ As Director of the Studio 4 Gaming Innovation research lab, Theresa focuses on researching games to redefine and explore what they can be and how they can be used to initiate transformation in our society. http://studio4gaminginnovation.com/

j.duran (Public High School Teacher/Private Post Secondary Instructor; Chicago)
j.duran is an artist and pedagogue who creates Rube Goldberg machines out of voltage differences. His process centers in the tension created through simultaneous reduction and abstraction that often manifests itself in creating code. He was granted an MFA in New Media in 2009 after earning a BS in Computer Science in 2001. duran has taught courses in Data Visualization, Interactive Art, and Systems at a public university in Chicago. Currently, j.duran is a Computer Science Teacher and the CTE Chair at a public high school where he teaches classes in games, new media, and computer science. In addition, he also teaches Experimental Games at a private post-secondary institution in Chicago.

Patrick Jagoda (University of Chicago; Chicago)
Patrick Jagoda is an Assistant Professor of English and an affiliate of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago. He specializes in media studies, twentieth and twenty-first century American literature, and digital game theory and design. Alongside this position, he is the co-founder of the Game Changer Chicago Design Lab and serves as a co-editor of the interdisciplinary journal Critical Inquiry. Jagoda is a published author with research and teaching expertise in: New Media; 20th and 21st Century American Fiction, Film, and Television; Critical Theory; American Cultural Studies; Game Studies; Science Studies; and Game Design. He co-edited two special issues: New Media and American Literature for American Literature (2013) and Comics & Media: A Special Issue of Critical Inquiry (2014). Two of his books will be published in 2016: Network Aesthetics, and The Game Worlds of Jason Rohrer (co-authored). Jagoda completed his PhD in the Department of English at Duke University in 2010, along with a graduate certificate in Information Science and Information Studies. http://www.patrickjagoda.com, https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/gamechanger/about/

Alex Myers (Creighton University; Omaha)
My research interests are far ranging and include games, architecture, violence, fear, mysticism, ambiguity, perception, movement, nature, extinction, death, and loss. I'd say that I'm interested in systems, but I think everything human is built upon systems. It's how we think. My methods and materials change to fit the needs of the project, but I spend a lot of time working in 3D environments like Blender and Unity. I have exhibited at NP3 in Groningen, Nikolaj Kunsthallen in Copenhagen, Lab for Electronic Art and Performance, Berlin, Interaccess in Toronto, FACT in Liverpool, and LACDA in Los Angeles, among others. I've twice been awards the Art and Culture Prize of Groningen, The Netherlands. Several years ago I received my MFA(Hons) in Interactive Media & Environments at The Frank Mohr Instituut of the Hanze University of Applied Science in Groningen, The Netherlands. In addition to making all sorts of weird stuff, I am an Assistant Professor of Design at Creighton University in Omaha, NE. I also occasionally mentor at the Kent Bellows Studio and Center for Visual Arts and give talks and workshops about Art Games, Interaction Design, and New Media Art.

Phoenix Perry (Goldsmiths, Founder Code Liberation Foundation, Co-Founder Dozen Eyes; London/NYC)
Phoenix Perry is an experienced developer, accidental public figure and general rebel rabble rouser. She's currently a lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London where she teaches physical computing and games. She builds emergent play environments that encourage group dynamics while engaging in the subtle art of suggesting games can address larger concerns in society. Her research attempts to extend the human senses through augmenting the perception of emotion. As a card carrying member of the gaming feminist killjoy party, she engages in regular acts of mild civil disobedience. You can find her in hacklabs burning herself on soldering irons or coffee shops caffeinating while punching code in chemically induced fits of brilliance before napping. Additionally, she's the property of a grey Egyptian Mau. All appearances and engagements are by the cat's permission only. http://phoenixperry.com, https://github.com/phoenixperry

Scott Richmond (Wayne State University; Detroit)
Scott C. Richmond is Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of English at Wayne State University, where his teaching and research focus on avant-garde cinema and experimental media, film theory and media theory, and phenomenology and critical theory. His work has appeared, among other places, in World Picture, Discourse, and the Journal of Visual Culture. He is co-editor, with Elizabeth Reich, of a special issue of Film Criticism entitled "New Approaches to Cinematic Identification." His first book, Cinema's Bodily Illusions: Flying, Floating, and Hallucinating, is forthcoming in fall 2016 from the University of Minnesota Press. On games and gaming, Scott has published an essay on boredom and gaming, “Vulgar Boredom: What Andy Warhol Can Teach Us about Candy Crush” (in JVC), and has presented widely on first-person gaming. He also regularly teaches both with and about games in humanities classes, especially low-fi, text-based, indie, experimental, and avant-garde games. In these classes, students work with games across many modalities, including analysis, research, theory, design, and making.

Brian Schrank (DePaul University; Chicago)
Brian Schrank is an artist and assistant professor at DePaul University in Chicago who develops games on experimental platforms such as puppets, installations, AR, and VR. His book "Avant-garde Videogames: Playing with Technoculture" places games within the context of art history and the avant-garde. His controversial game "Pedandeck" challenges conventions by prompting people to play the Grammar Nazi or Race Card in their everyday lives. He earned his Ph.D. in digital media and videogames from Georgia Tech. http://www.brianschrank.com


Arraylist series details here: http://arrayproject.com/content/discussion Subscribe here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist The purpose of ArrayList is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). Subscribe to the listserv so that you can read [fly-on-the-wall is a-ok AKA lurking] and/or respond to the written activity, and read the archives. We hope to engage a wide range of critical perspectives so please chime in with thoughts and questions. Sincerely, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY[ ] founders

 

“Digital Curation” – What’s in a Word (or Two)?

In early October, 2015, Phyllis Hecht and Joyce Ray, both faculty in Johns Hopkins University Museum Studies program, hosted a summit meeting in Washington DC on the topic of Digital Curation. I was lucky to be able to attend this 2-day meeting and, since this was not a public conference, I wanted to share some of the experience with a broader audience.

The goals of the meeting were to:

  1. Highlight innovative practices supported by digital curation in art museums and discuss the opportunities and challenges that these present;
  2. Identify the roles and responsibilities of digital curation interns, faculty supervisors, and host organizations/mentors; and,
  3. Publish a summary report on the value of digital curation in art museums, the role of art museums in educating a new generation of digital curators, and the potential role of digital curation internships and research in advancing the art museum mission.

Attendees included about 30 museum directors, curators, museum CIO’s and technology staff, vendors, consultants, and foundation leaders. The two days were formatted in sections; each kicked off by a presentation, followed by broad-ranging open discussion. Presentations were offered by individuals below (that give a sense of the group’s professional diversity):

  • Phyllis Hecht & Joyce Ray, Johns Hopkins University
  • Diane Zorich, Consultant
  • John Ryan, Local Projects
  • Douglas Hegley, Minneapolis Institute of Art
  • Ben Fino-Raden, MoMA
  • Anne Goodyear, Bowdoin College Museum of Art
  • George Coulbourne, Library of Congress
  • Eleanor Fink, American Art Collaborative
  • Monkia Hagedorn-Saupe, Institue fur Museumsforschung

Of particular interest to me was a topic that could have been some semantic navel-gazing - defining “Digital Curation” - but was, in fact, due to the discussants, a chance to frame curating itself anew. “Digital Curation” was being used in the room much like it is elsewhere, very broadly to mean any act of selection, organization, and management applied to digital content conducted by any person (but most likely a cultural heritage professional, be they curator or IT manager.) Museum professionals in the room brought up the fact that “curating” as a term has experienced some dilution of late. These days, boutique shop windows are “curated,” craft beers are presented by beer curators, and everyone with an Instagram account is an image curator. However, rather than be caught up in this false dilemma of professionalism v. populism, discussants took the conversation in a more constructive direction. Anne Goodyear and Rob Stein (Dallas Museum of Art) discussed how - to paraphrase - quantitative shifts in the mass availability of information may lead to qualitative shifts in thinking. At the end of the first morning, that lead me to tweet:

“A new human consciousness emerged this morning at #jhudigcur @JHMuseumStudies & kinda blew my tiny mind. Had to leave to rethink curating.”

The next morning, having had a night to stew on that, I tweeted my proposed definition of Digital Curation:

“Digital curation may or may not use digital objects & tools but is curating in relation to network consciousness.”

I’ll have to see if that holds up to scrutiny or to practice. In the meantime, the folks at JHU are planning to publish proceedings from this meeting that will include, hopefully, not only more detail than this snapshot post, but also an index of suggested sources on the topic of digital curation. As you might have guessed, you can also find the event in tweet-archive form under #jhudigcur.

Richard Rinehart, Director, Samek Art Museum, Bucknell University

Upcoming Deadlines and Announcements

Just getting a few reminders in the pipeline for you!

Our posted announcements with November Deadlines are tagged on our site here.

In particular, the Media-N Journal has a call out for proposals for the Spring 2016 issue. More info in this post, and upcoming on the Media-N Journal website.

At Bard there is going to be a talk on film preservation:

Thursday, November 5
Paik on Film: Discovering, Archiving, and Preserving Fluxus

Lori Zippay, Electronic Arts Intermix Executive Director

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm 

$15.00 General Admission 
FREE for students with valid ID
Bard Graduate Center
38 West 86 Street
Register: 212.501.3011programs@bgc.bard.edu

Lori Zippay, Electronic Arts Intermix Executive Director, talks on film preservation in relation to moving image works. She introduces a selection of films, including Button Happening, Digital Experiment at Bell Labs, Vide-Film Concert, and Rare Performance Documents, from the EAI collection For more information and to register click here.  [http://www.bgc.bard.edu/news/events/paik-on-film.html

 

Stimulus Response Affect: New Media Art in the Greater Lakes Region – prologue

SRA_FullColor Version_outlines-2

We are delighted to announce the opening of the exhibition Stimulus Response Affect, which explores varied ways artists engage the human body through sensorial, perceptual, chronological and spatial shifts, using sound and kinetic sculpture, interactive video, participatory games, augmented reality, social media and programmed software.

The Oakland University Art Gallery is hosting this event, co-curated by Colleen Ludwig and Vagner M. Whitehead. From October 16, 2015 to November 22, 2015, eleven works by fourteen artists from around the Great Lakes, in the U.S. and Canada.

These dynamic artworks activate the viewer as a participant, raising questions about self, relationships, surroundings and society, and provide the unique opportunity to experience and actively (re)consider the relevance and implications of innovative interactive contemporary art. With this in mind, we also invite you to attend a special symposium in conjunction with the exhibition the day after the opening.

The exhibition opens on October 16, from 6 to 8 pm.

On October 17, from 9 to 5 pm, featured artists will engage with the public in a four session symposium.

Play, Response and Learning

- Cristobal Mendoza and Annica Cuppetelli

- Bradley Tober

- Brian Patrick Franklin and Chris Wille

Text, Error Message, Codification, Reverb

- Sophia Brueckner

- Andrea Roberts

- Meg Mitchell

Malleable Architecture, Space and Time

- Brian Schrank

- Aaron Higgins

Augmented Reality, Conflict and Participation

- Channel TWo (Adam Trowbridge and Jessica Westbrook)

- Byron Rich and John Wenskovitch

- Ben Grosser (via Skype)

The SRA symposium will be live-streamed at the Hub in an upcoming post; we invite you to return and participate from afar.

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On Media Players and Dulltech

As artists that work with digital media, we must constantly navigate the space between hardware, software, and our concept or artistic intent. And as we make our work we must also develop strategies for how that work gets displayed in whatever venue we have available. For example, perhaps we make a video artwork. Immediate decisions for distribution and viewing of that work have to be made - do we upload and let people stream from vimeo or youtube? if we do that, do we let there be commercials or rental payment to generate revenue from views? If we keep the work offline, where do we show it and how? Film festivals and video screenings are popular, but then how do transfer or file and how much compression or how large of a file should we send? The questions start snowballing... and there aren't really any easy answers because it sometimes there are just too many variables.

Installing video work in a gallery is another one of those challenges with a lot of variables. In some cases its a good idea to supply as much of your own equipment as you can. With each successive generation of video monitors and/or media players or devices there are additional limitations on what can be played back and how its controlled. But artists are good at finding workarounds, stretching a budget, and at figuring out how to make it work. Gallery directors and assistants on the other hand, might not find it all that easy to following our process or directions. It all starts to seem like an almost overwhelming cascade of potential problems.

Over the last several weeks (or months) I've been following an artist project that seeks to address some of these questions. DullTech™ is a campaign initiated by Dutch conceptual artist Constant Dullart. To me the project is fascinating - its part artwork, part startup, part prodcut, and part commentary on contemporary techno culture. If you have some time, you should check it out - but I'll paraphrase: its a media player that doesn't have any menus and can connect wirelessly and sync to other media players and loop whatever file is on your thumb drive. That's it. Nothing more, nothing less (unless I missed something). That's a breathe of fresh air if you ask me. An artist working on a solution for a problem we all encounter by making a product that is also a bit of an artwork itself. I asked Dullart a few questions and here's what he had to say!

RE: artist problems with video installations:

"Blood sweat and tears, days of rendering, getting special computers, and programming. It was mainly the stress and the time consumption that we did not understand, and thought was too complex. But we always got it done. These installs just needed to get more dull. So there would be more time making the content exciting! So we just designed a device without playlists, menu’s and difficult settings. One that would just play and sync video, and do that well. Just switch it on and you’re done. Weirdly enough it wasn’t that hard. Most machines just have too many options... "

RE: building tech products in China and becoming a 'startup'

"The atmosphere in Shenzhen was that western people randomly wanting to go to factories would take up time, or would be journalists writing about the conditions in the factories. The "Mr Daisey and the Apple factory” episode on This American Life, and the attention that got for example, even after the necessary retraction made it hard to “just be a visitor”. Learning how this business actually works from the inside was much more interesting. Like the artist Li Liao did when he worked in the Foxconn factory until he could afford the product he was working on. After 45 days he could afford the iPad mini. After meeting him we were inspired to play out our part in the neo colonial creative industry process."

RE: is it artwork, commercial product, critique?

"DullTech™ is a hardware startup and performative artwork concurrently. Created as a form of radical corporate publishing in an age of high efficiency capitalism, it creates technologically simplified or 'dull' products in order to distribute artworks in tribute to the late Ray Johnson. Initiated during a 2012 OCAT residency in Shenzhen China, with the company's motto 'neoliberal startup lulz', most products relate to production processes in the artist's studio. The company has exhibited in the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam, HMKV Dortmund, Transmediale Berlin and the White Building in London."

RE: favorite file formats

"Of course we would pick the most dull one, that works the best, h264 in an mp4.Which coincidentally also works really well on our player, up to 60Mbps!"

You can check out DullTech™ on their kickstarter, there is still plenty of time to get in on the ground floor. There are a lot of artists projects out there in crowdfunding platforms but I can't help but share this one because its such a great fit with my experience as an artist. Good luck DullTech™ !

ISEA2015 :: Disruptive Closing Ceremony

After another great day of listening, meeting, and discussing, The Yes Men keynote and closing ceremony was intense. It unexpectedly began with a student protest after the opening remarks by Simon Fraser's President, Andrew Petter. The student called attention to alleged monies being accepted by Simon Fraser from the tar sands pipeline. The Yes Men where then asked to participate in a video to assist in the protest by the student (NSFW), which they readily did. This was all very disruptive, and therefore, highly appropriate.

The Yes Men continued with their goals and background, showing clips from their recent movie: The Yes Men are Revolting.They are available for workshops and hope to encourage others in their own hijinks.

Right before the keynote began, I was sitting near Leo Selvaggio of the URME project fame, which was at the DISRUPTION opening reception. He was kind enough to let me handle the 3D printed mask. It is eerily gorgeous and if you ever have the chance, it is worth a closer look.

It was wonderful to catch up with many NMC members that I had met at CAA 2014 and 2015, such as Leo and also Taylor Hokanson. Taylor and Dieter Kirkwood were "Hacking the Knitting Machine" in a workshop they had given earlier in the conference. I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of my Brother KH-930e.

After the closing, the conference was handed over to Hong Kong for 2016. I can't wait for the ISEA2016 Cultural R>evolution!

Reminder on NMC Opportunities with Approaching Deadlines

We realize you may have already seen this on our site or in our emails. But, it never hurts to get that extra reminder. Especially considering that some of these deadlines will be right around the corner. If you happen to be procrastinating or busy preparing your courses for Fall Semester, maybe take a few minutes and propose that paper or project that you are so excited about. The New Media Caucus Events and Exhibitions Committee is working on some really great programming - and you could be a part of it all!

Dispatch from Vancouver – ISEA2015 Part 2

ISEA2015 is barely half over, and its amazing to think back to what's already happened and also what is still to come. I'm not able to stay for the entire conference, but have really enjoyed the engaging programming and all of the events. I'm going to just mention a few... as I'm sure you know its impossible to see everything that you really want to at a conference of this scale. The quality of what I've seen and heard about, however, puts you in the position where its difficult to make a bad decision - there's something for everyone.

On Sunday morning, Brian Massumi delivered an intense and immensely interesting keynote address to a packed room. The talk was centered around what he sees as key concepts in explaining his approach and interest in affect. He also careful expanded on some of the misconceptions surrounding those concepts. Although the talk was dense, it was a great way to kick off the next several days which will include hundreds of papers, posters, demos, exhibitions (proceedings here).

And in regards to exhibitions, it would be hard to report on what I did and saw in Vancouver without going back to the Saturday evening opening of the ISEA Disruption exhibition at Vancouver Art Gallery. The show coincided with an annual event at the gallery called FUSE. After the private opening for ISEA attendees, the gallery opened to the community and it included music and performances in the gallery courtyard/park. The word is that something like 5000 people attended the opening - it was completely packed. The gallery was so crowded at times it was tricky to see the work, but if that's a trade off for being able to show and share the work that artist involved with ISEA are doing then its not necessarily a bad thing in my opinion.

A second keynote was given by Michael Connor from Rhizome on Sunday afternoon. He gave an interesting overview of the development of the site and organization over the years and its numerous shifts in focus. I couldn't make out in his conclusion whether or not he thinks Rhizome , as an institution of some sort, is acting basic or is normcore. 

Sunday evening programming included an opening at the Museum of Vancouver. Just outside the museum, as the evening went on, the sun set over the mountains/bay. And after a quick ride back to the SFU Woodwards campus the night continued on with audio/visual performances. This was the first of the two nights of performance programming from the Mutek Cabaret. It was another intense and interesting way to end a intellectually stimulating and fun day.

I'm about to board my plane... I can't believe I'm gonna miss the next few days, with equally engaging content. Don't miss The Yes Men or Rosa Menkman - all having keynotes later this week.

--END DISPATCH

Dispatch from Vancouver – ISEA2015 Part 1

I'm a bit at a loss for words, but wanted to share a little bit as everything starts to take off here in Vancouver for ISEA2015. If you're around, you should try to catch up with me, but I know it's probably next to impossible with all the great things going on. Thanks so much to Simon Frasier University and just about all of Vancouver for the welcome and good vibez!

As I write this dispatch, I'm sitting at the venue waiting, excitedly for the Hakanaï performance to begin. I've heard a lot of great things about their work and am eagerly anticipating the show.   Hakanaï  are part of the Movement in Computing Workshop (MOCO) programming during the first few days at the symposium. This is of particular interest to me, as a MOCO participant, because of the combination of live realtime, audio/visual performance and installation. There is a lot happening in these vectors : the crossovers/intersections of the Arts and Technology. 

But this is really just the tip of the digital media practices in the proverbial cross-pollinating theory/practice oceans of contemporary technological experience. In the next several days there will be artists and scholars from across our planet aligning in Vancouver and mixing it all up. I'll be in and out of panels, papers, demos, posters, performances, screenings, and just about as much as I can handle. I promise to write a little more during and after it all. Maybe we'll cross paths - or if you want to cross paths and we didn't yet - I'll be at the Vancouver Art Gallery Opening for FUSE/DISRUPTION for sure (I've got something to show there) - hope to catch up with you!!!¡¡¡

--END DISPATCH

 

 

#ISEA2015 and #MOCO'15

A photo posted by a bill miller (@abillmiller) on

Characteristics of Internet-based Art

            The “ongoing” characteristics of Internet-based art offer an open-ended element to the concept of a project. These characteristics begin with access and presentation on the Internet, but are always supplemented with the specific intent of the artist.

            Artist, Dina Kelberman has a couple of ongoing projects listed on her website. One of Dina’s processes is to form her art by surfing the web. These found digital images range from cartoons to postings of personal videos. They are grouped by subject matter in a free-form visual association to create her Internet-based projects. The online-only exhibition website page of the New Museum has more about Dina’s artistic practice.

            The Smoke & Fire and Sleep Video are two examples of Dina’s ongoing projects listed under her 2013 work website category. She believes this pattern of working began subconsciously, but she gave credit to the very malleable nature of digital art. Dina refers to this quality simply by saying "I can always change these so I will whenever I want."

            The malleability of digital art and Dina’s experimental approach to her projects does have a specific method that makes them coherent. The majority of the projects are based on rules pertaining to the process of collecting. Some of these rules conclude the collecting process more quickly than others, because the content is exhausted. The Internet offers new daily content for Dina to surf (if she wishes) and to continue the “ongoing” aspect.

            This characteristics of digital art have other components besides what the artist changes or adds to the project. Dina pointed out that recently, YouTube had a bug and it drastically changed the condition of the Sleep Video. The Sleep Video was formed by an overlaid YouTube playlist, which was created with found videos that are periodically edited and reconfigured.

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Still from "Sleep Video" Courtesy of: Dina Kelberman

            During the process of reconfiguring the videos for the playlist, Dina explained her thought process. She first thought to herself how this felt like a problem, but after reviewing the new iteration of the video her thoughts went to "this is the whole point of this." She is referring to the ending description of the Sleep Video that the video is “periodically edited and reconfigured.” This example demonstrates another side of digital art being malleable. By the video being hosted by a current social media platform, the Sleep Video is open to the possibilities of others restructuring a video social media site with their specific intentions.

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Screenshot of "Sleep Video" webpage showing playlist. Courtesy of: Dina Kelberman

            Focusing on one of the many methods of Dina’s experimental approaches, which she calls “fiddling around,” I will explore how the use of digital media and her artistic intent work together. In the btwfyi section of her website, part of her statement about her work is that fiddling around is important to her. Fiddling around is an important part of the experimental art process, but I consider the fiddling around process as a broader part of digital media. I wanted to take into consideration that a lot of types of media called for a little fiddling around, such as in the 20th Century before cable television. In order to maintain a clear picture on a television set the antenna needed to be fiddled with to find the right broadcasting signals.

            The fiddling around can be applied to many aspects of digital media. Dina’s method of surfing the web would entail adjusting the type of content details that enable her to create multiple outcomes with searches. These open ended results from fiddling around to form art and the use of digital media as a medium place undetermined variables into an art practice, viewing art, and of course the traditional concept of archiving artwork. By making this statement, I can’t help but recall that the projects are based on rules pertaining to the process of collecting. The collecting process can also be seen as malleable. Of course depending on what is being specifically collected and I view Dina’s work as a personal collection. The process has its own ongoing activity, lulls, and if the collection is still in progress it has its own fluidity within the everyday activities on the Internet.

By: Carrie Ida Edinger   

Carrie’s interest with new media is in interdisciplinary methods and the use of the Internet as a presentation site for evolving contemporary projects.

Hub – The New Media Caucus Blog

Hub - the New Media Caucus blogHello World!

A hub is a point of convergence - for networks, devices, physical or virtual objects, and for people. It is our goal to use this space to bring together, and to distribute.

 The New Media Caucus has been working behind the scenes to create a space on our website for members to share content - through a new blog we are calling: Hub ! Over the next several months we will begin to roll out this portion of our website - see you back here soon!

JULY 2015 THEME: CODE on ARRAYLIST LISTSERV –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

Announcing the upcoming July 2015 ArrayList discussion theme: New Media Foundations: Code!

Sign up/join in here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist

The purpose of ArrayList is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). Thanks, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, and Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY founders

JULY 2015 GUEST THREAD LEADERS

Ubi de Feo:
very curious person, creative technologist
"I was born in 1974 and I believe I belong to one of the most lucky, unique generations ever lived: I am part of a demographic which grew up without Internet, slowly saw it appearing on computer screens, and gradually transitioned into a world where the net is now in our pockets, on our wrists, in our fridge and many more connected devices. I started taking stuff apart when I was 6, and this desire to discover the inner workings of objects has guided me my whole life through hacking computers, engines, code and electronics. Armed with this curiosity I became interested in many aspects of computing and technology, as well as many things technical. ... I currently teach programming, electronics and other things to whoever wants to learn, often developing my own methods to explain really complicated things in a more tangible, down-to-earth fashion. I do not try to teach things I don't thoroughly understand, which often leads me to learn completely new subjects in order to be able to explain them to myself and others. In my off-time, when I shower or do the dishes, I think about ways to improve things or invent new ones. I began experimenting with mobile devices in 2001, and internet connected objects in 2007." more: http://ubidefeo.com, https://github.com/ubidefeo

Evelyn Eastmond:
Viewpoints Research Institute, Digital+Media, RISD
Evelyn Eastmond is an artist and software researcher. She received her BS and MEng degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT and an MFA in Digital + Media from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2003, she joined the Lifelong Kindergarten Group's Scratch project at the MIT Media Lab, where she worked for seven years as a software engineer, user experience designer, and workshop facilitator. Before leaving MIT for RISD in 2010, she developed DesignBlocks, a spinoff of Scratch focused on interactive computer graphics. At RISD, Evelyn became interested in the languages of traditional painting and drawing and their loose relation to the languages of computing. Evelyn is currently interested in the role of computation in contemporary arts, media and culture and in how the design of programming languages and learning environments affects the stories people can tell with them. She recently completed a residency at the Gushul Studio in Alberta, Canada. She has shown work in Providence and Boston, and has lectured and taught new media workshops and courses internationally. more info: https://github.com/evhan55

Ira Greenberg:
Director, Center of Creative Computation and Professor, Computer Science and Engineering Southern Methodist University
With an eclectic background combining studio arts and computer science, Ira Greenberg has been a painter, 2D and 3D animator, print designer, web and interactive designer/developer, programmer, art director, creative director, managing director, art and computer science professor and author. He wrote the first major language reference on the Processing programming language, Processing: Creative Coding and Computational Art, (Berkeley, CA: friends of ED, 2007). Greenberg holds a B.F.A. from Cornell University and an M.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. Greenberg’s research and teaching interests include aesthetics and computation, expressive programming, emergent forms, net-based art, artificial intelligence (and stupidity), physical computing and computer art pedagogy (and anything else that tickles his fancy). He is currently building a new 3D Graphics Library, called Protobyte, for developing artificial life forms. more info: http://iragreenberg.com, https://www.smu.edu/Meadows/AreasOfStudy/CreativeComputation/Faculty/GreenbergIra

Rebecca Miller-Webster
Software Engineer and Managing Director thoughtbot Chicago, Write+Speak+code Conference Organizer, Educator
Rebecca Miller-Webster is a software engineer, conference organizer, and teacher. She is the founder of Write/Speak/Code and Managing Director for thoughtbot Chicago. Rebecca has been developing software professionally for over 10 years and previously organized GORUCO. She was the founding teacher at Dev Bootcamp NYC and has taught hundreds of students software development as well as led workshops on public speaking, leadership, and oppression. Rebecca holds an Masters in Computer Science and a BA in Women and Gender Studies from Washington University in St. Louis and was named one of 7 Brilliant Women in Tech by Craig Nemark, founder of Craigslist. She loves cupcakes, sea mammals, and prosecco. Rebecca lives in Oak Park, IL with her husband, black pug, and rescued havenese. And she changes her hair. A lot. more: http://www.rebeccamiller-webster.com, https://github.com/rmw

Daniel Shiffman:
Assistant Arts Professor, Interactive Telecommunications Program, NYU Tisch School of the Arts
Daniel Shiffman works as an Associate Arts Professor at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. Originally from Baltimore, Daniel received a BA in Mathematics and Philosophy from Yale University and a Master's Degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Program. He works on developing tutorials, examples, and libraries for Processing, the open source programming language and environment created by Casey Reas and Ben Fry. He is the author of Learning Processing: A Beginner's Guide to Programming Images, Animation, and Interaction and The Nature of Code (self-published via Kickstarter), an open source book about simulating natural phenomenon in Processing. more: http://shiffman.net

 

Fluxus Digital Collection Launches

We are pleased to announce the launch of The Fluxus Digital Collection. This online archive gathers an eclectic range of artworks by one of the most important movements of the twentieth century. Global in scope, Fluxus members moved between the USA, Europe, East Asia, and elsewhere. They worked across and between traditional media, opting for ephemeral materials, participatory approaches, and playful humor.

The collection includes digital tools that make interactive objects and text-based works available to viewers—many of which have not been read, seen, or heard outside of select archives. With technical tools that include 3-D modeling, digital scanning, photography, and film, the Fluxus Digital Collection gives worldwide access to scholars, teachers, students, and art-lovers.

“Video pioneer Nam June Paik organized the first art exhibition on the World Wide Web in 1994,” explains Fluxus artist and collection donor Ken Friedman. “Since then, Fluxus artists and composers have had a durable presence of event scores, images, documents, web sites, exhibitions, publications, and more. Some vanished when links broke and web sites disappeared. Others continue to overcome the limits of fragile artifacts that museums preserve by protecting them from people. The Fluxus Digital Collection brings works back to life, returning them to the world where they belong with a future as lively as the past.”

The University of Iowa Special Collections houses a trove of yet-to-be processed Fluxus art, writing, and correspondence. The Fluxus Digital Collection will continue to grow as we add new content.

Artists featured in the collection include: John Cage, Dick Higgins, George Brecht, Robert Watts, Ken Friedman, George Maciunas, Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys, Milan Knížák, Ben Vautier, Nam June Paik, Frank Zappa, Robert Filliou, Mieko Shiomi, Shigeko Kubota, Ben Patterson, Dieter Roth, Eric Andersen, Takehisa Kosugi, Ay-O, and others.

Supporting Partners
The University of Iowa
Digital Studio for Public Arts & Humanities
UI Library Digital Research & Publishing
Special Collections

For more information, contact:
Dr. Stephen Voyce
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Digital Studio for the Public Humanities
University of Iowa
E: stephen-voyce@uiowa.edu
T: 1.319.333.1923


 

The Fluxus Digital Collection is made possible by three University of Iowa programs: the Public Humanities in a Digital World (PHDW) initiative, Special Collections, and the University Library's Digital Research and Publishing arm.

PHDW's focus is the impact of academic work on civic life and society, using the opportunities provided by digital technologies to amplify and distribute broadly what faculty do as teachers and scholars, collaborating with communities on projects that have social and artistic impact, and envisioning new ways of interacting with our many publics.

Special Collections contains over 200,000 rare books ranging in age from the 15th century to newly created artists' books; over 800 manuscript collections, medieval to modern; and 7,000 feet of records that document the University’s history. The Libraries' repository of primary source materials includes exceptional literary collections of writers from Walt Whitman to Iris Murdoch; historical collections document the French Revolution, Westward Expansion, the Civil War, Chautauqua and vaudeville performers, the culinary arts, political cartooning, screenwriting, and more. Our holdings also include tens of thousands of pamphlets, photographs, posters, sound recordings, and other formats.

Digital Research & Publishing explores ways that academic libraries can best leverage digital collections, resources, and expertise to support faculty and student scholars by: (1) Collaborating on interdisciplinary scholarship built upon digital collections; (2) Offering publishing services to support sustainable scholarly communication; (3) Engaging the community through participatory digital initiatives; (4) Promoting widespread use and reuse of locally built repositories and archives; (5) Advancing new technologies that support digital research and publishing.

NMC Blog Test

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