Tag Archives: online

Kit Galloway – Networked Conversations

Interview with Kit Galloway, co-founder of the Electronic Café with Sherrie Rabinowitz ::: Monday, April 24, 6:00pm-7:00pm (PDT) / 9:00pm-10:00pm (EDT) ::: Networked Conversations is hosted by Randall Packer ::: live & online via Internet chat.

Login & participate via Internet chat:
https://connect.ntu.edu.sg/thirdspacenetwork/
Select “Guest,” type your name, and “Enter Room.”

About Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz

Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz are widely recognized pioneering artists of communications art. They were among the first artists to begin exploring performance with satellite technologies in the 1970s, leading to their seminal work, Hole-in-Space in 1980.

In 1984, they founded the Electronic Café, a project commissioned by the LA Museum of Contemporary Art and Olympic Arts Festival, joining cafés and restaurants that connected culturally diverse communities in Los Angeles. People at the sites exchanged drawings, photos, poems, video and fax messages via a dedicated network: the prototypical “cybercafé” nearly ten years before the Web became a mass medium. The artists’ commitment to using technologies to enhance community interaction led them to establish the Electronic Café as an ongoing space in Santa Monica, where it became internationally known as an influential hub for dialogue, exhibitions, and performance dedicated to networked art.

Upcoming Events

May 13 — Annie Abrahams, pioneering Internet performance artist from Montpellier, France.

June 17 — Gene Youngblood, author of Expanded Cinema, from Santa Fe, New Mexico

Third Space Network

The Third Space Network (3SN) is an Internet broadcast channel for live performance and conversation ::: online and global.

For more information: http://thirdspacenetwork.com/

The Third Space Network (3SN) is an Internet broadcast channel, a project of Randall Packer and collaborators with support from the School of Art, Design and Media at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Networked Conversations features media artists, curators, writers, and activists exploring a broad range of social, political and aesthetic topics at the intersection of net culture. Networked Conversations collapses geographical and cultural boundaries via participatory Internet chat: free & open & accessible from anywhere in the world.

A Normal Future – Interview with NORMALS

Normals is a collective whose work crosses a number of boundaries. Perhaps their work is a proposal that the boundaries we once found useful in defining creative practice don’t work as well in our connected/networked/hybrid cultures. What do the spaces between design, digital studio practice, networked art, and Internet Art look like? What do the spaces between fiction, abstraction, and social media performance look like? What do the spaces between the real, the virtual, and the augmented look like? It isn’t easy to define through traditional categories what artists create in our contemporary visual culture more broadly and definitely challenging with the work of Normals in particular.
I met Normals in 2012 at the 2nd International Computer Art Congress in Paris, where their physical bodies live and work. Since that time they have continued to produce multifaceted speculative works of multiple disciplinary categories. In the past several months, they have been promoting a new work - APPAREL. Our interview focuses on that work but is ongoing.
# Hi Normals - for our readers not familiar with your work, tell us about APPAREL. The work has a number of parts - how do they fit together?
APPAREL is a piece of clothing designed to co-exist in the digital and physical spaces. It comes as a polygonal black cape, and an iOS application allowing the wearer to see the piece’s digital counterpart, in augmented reality. The cape itself is as minimalistic as its digital overlay is complex and refined. The digital model is generated through a text analysis of the wearer's Twitter feed, evolving in real time, and creates a unique piece of clothing, as an info-graphic, an incarnation of the wearer's online personality.
Being a speculative studio working on anticipation, we like to imagine what a world where our “products” are widespread would look like, and for that specific reason we tend to pair our projects with loads of fiction, describing hypothetical users, and their relationship to theses objects in a future where they have become… well… normal. So, for APPAREL, not only did we make a functional product (with the coding help of Julien “V3ga” Gachadoat), but we also imagined a future fashion show, a fashion contest, in which everybody wears an Apparel and competes over their digital personalities.
This has been the subject to a short story, a video depicting one of the contestants (3PLUS3MAKE5), a soundtrack generated from the contestants’ profiles, and a faux-documentary depicting fashion’s transfer over to the digital realm.
The work is speculative, but it is also about things that are currently happening and developing in Arts/Tech environments.  What do you think are some of the more interesting directions in creative culture today?
Everything speculative is about something currently happening! Honestly, there are many interesting aspects to the evolution of arts, tech, and fashion, but we decided to focus on one question that has driven the entire project: “what would our clothes look like if they became digital?” Considering AR as a potential technology to display a data-based esthetic layer over physical things, it seemed obvious that all things esthetic would transit to this reactive and polymorphous layer of contextual information. On the other hand, the physical piece of clothing had to be reduced to a simple protective piece of fabric, a pedestal for its glorious digital overlay.
But to answer your question, we feel anything can be interesting as long as it doesn’t fall into the trap of “fascination.” The role of artists, designers, or “futurists” is to look at what tomorrow might bring without being so fascinated by their subject that they transform critical thinking into wishful thinking without even knowing it. “What will [insert something] look like in the future?” is always a valid question, as long as the answer isn’t “flying cars” or “eternal life.” No one should look at innovation as something purely good or purely bad: whatever’s interesting lies in the middle.
APPAREL had/has a number of contestants - Users creating and sharing their fashion/design - what are some of your favorites?
We love them all! When imagining a product or an object, it’s always extremely fun to imagine the people interacting with it, whether it is as “hackers” of the system, or people full of admiration for the “progress” it stands for, it is one of the main focuses of our practice: imaginary users for speculative objects.
All the characters described in the story are representative of  an “attitude” towards digital fashion: the main character, Abdlcroco, is a competitor who only runs after achievements, while Mangel is seeking for the perfect performance, and 3PLUS3MAKE5 cultivates eye-candies to satisfy her audience’s craving for fun and cute things. Duall is probably the most intriguing character though, being someone who doesn’t care about this fashion contest, but comes to watch it every day, and is, despite his efforts to make people believe he doesn’t care, part of this system too.
A question for one of the contestants - is AbdlCroco available? 
He is.
Screen Shot 2016-04-18 at 10.11.32 AM
AbdlCroco - you used to be one of the top ranked contestants - tell our readers about one of your most highly rated designs - what was it like? What did the crowd think?
What I do is very personal. Whatever I feel like on the moment, I just turn it into a situational dance that spits epileptic graphics right into the viewer’s ‘i’. But if I have to chose one… I’d say back when I was Number Six or something. There was this one time… See, I made these bunky prisms that would go boom-boom-boom in your face as the bass in the soundtrack — the most epic collection of the deepest, darkest, fattest bass samples you could find on the Stream — also went boom-boom-boom. Even the floor looked like it was shaking, with all the lines blinking up and down looted from SK000N’s template — you know the one I’m talking about, right? So I had all this set up, and as I stepped on stage, there was some kind of power shutdown or something, and all the lights went out, and it was so in sync with my show that every frenz thought it was all planned. But truly it wasn’t. Just got lucky. And frenz digged my stuff so hard they remained silent throughout the whole thing, and I even got a standing ovation — well, the “standing” part doesn’t count though, everyone was standing already. But still got an ovation. That one was the best. Got straight to number 4 after that. But that was another time…
AbdlCroco - what do you think of Mangel’s fashion? His work seems to be on top lately - what does the crowd like about Mangel?
Allow me to speak frankly: Mangel’s a joke! Every single day Trudent welcomes a fashion show, with rules, RULES — you are judged on your LOOKS. The performance has now become a part of the show, and I’m okay with that: you should be able to display your outfit in the best manner possible. But what I HATE is frenz who use the performance to go hypno on the audience, to a point where they’re not even looking at the ONLY thing they should be looking at. Mangel’s just a comedian, he acts, makes people laugh, but no one sees that he just copies everyone else, and never comes up with ANYTHING NEW. Yet people like him, so they vote for him, and he remains there, everyday, trolling his way to the top.
 Normals - Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts with us, we look forward to seeing what happens next!

JULY 2015 THEME: CODE on ARRAYLIST LISTSERV –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

Announcing the upcoming July 2015 ArrayList discussion theme: New Media Foundations: Code!

Sign up/join in here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist

The purpose of ArrayList is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). Thanks, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, and Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY founders

JULY 2015 GUEST THREAD LEADERS

Ubi de Feo:
very curious person, creative technologist
"I was born in 1974 and I believe I belong to one of the most lucky, unique generations ever lived: I am part of a demographic which grew up without Internet, slowly saw it appearing on computer screens, and gradually transitioned into a world where the net is now in our pockets, on our wrists, in our fridge and many more connected devices. I started taking stuff apart when I was 6, and this desire to discover the inner workings of objects has guided me my whole life through hacking computers, engines, code and electronics. Armed with this curiosity I became interested in many aspects of computing and technology, as well as many things technical. ... I currently teach programming, electronics and other things to whoever wants to learn, often developing my own methods to explain really complicated things in a more tangible, down-to-earth fashion. I do not try to teach things I don't thoroughly understand, which often leads me to learn completely new subjects in order to be able to explain them to myself and others. In my off-time, when I shower or do the dishes, I think about ways to improve things or invent new ones. I began experimenting with mobile devices in 2001, and internet connected objects in 2007." more: http://ubidefeo.com, https://github.com/ubidefeo

Evelyn Eastmond:
Viewpoints Research Institute, Digital+Media, RISD
Evelyn Eastmond is an artist and software researcher. She received her BS and MEng degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT and an MFA in Digital + Media from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2003, she joined the Lifelong Kindergarten Group's Scratch project at the MIT Media Lab, where she worked for seven years as a software engineer, user experience designer, and workshop facilitator. Before leaving MIT for RISD in 2010, she developed DesignBlocks, a spinoff of Scratch focused on interactive computer graphics. At RISD, Evelyn became interested in the languages of traditional painting and drawing and their loose relation to the languages of computing. Evelyn is currently interested in the role of computation in contemporary arts, media and culture and in how the design of programming languages and learning environments affects the stories people can tell with them. She recently completed a residency at the Gushul Studio in Alberta, Canada. She has shown work in Providence and Boston, and has lectured and taught new media workshops and courses internationally. more info: https://github.com/evhan55

Ira Greenberg:
Director, Center of Creative Computation and Professor, Computer Science and Engineering Southern Methodist University
With an eclectic background combining studio arts and computer science, Ira Greenberg has been a painter, 2D and 3D animator, print designer, web and interactive designer/developer, programmer, art director, creative director, managing director, art and computer science professor and author. He wrote the first major language reference on the Processing programming language, Processing: Creative Coding and Computational Art, (Berkeley, CA: friends of ED, 2007). Greenberg holds a B.F.A. from Cornell University and an M.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. Greenberg’s research and teaching interests include aesthetics and computation, expressive programming, emergent forms, net-based art, artificial intelligence (and stupidity), physical computing and computer art pedagogy (and anything else that tickles his fancy). He is currently building a new 3D Graphics Library, called Protobyte, for developing artificial life forms. more info: http://iragreenberg.com, https://www.smu.edu/Meadows/AreasOfStudy/CreativeComputation/Faculty/GreenbergIra

Rebecca Miller-Webster
Software Engineer and Managing Director thoughtbot Chicago, Write+Speak+code Conference Organizer, Educator
Rebecca Miller-Webster is a software engineer, conference organizer, and teacher. She is the founder of Write/Speak/Code and Managing Director for thoughtbot Chicago. Rebecca has been developing software professionally for over 10 years and previously organized GORUCO. She was the founding teacher at Dev Bootcamp NYC and has taught hundreds of students software development as well as led workshops on public speaking, leadership, and oppression. Rebecca holds an Masters in Computer Science and a BA in Women and Gender Studies from Washington University in St. Louis and was named one of 7 Brilliant Women in Tech by Craig Nemark, founder of Craigslist. She loves cupcakes, sea mammals, and prosecco. Rebecca lives in Oak Park, IL with her husband, black pug, and rescued havenese. And she changes her hair. A lot. more: http://www.rebeccamiller-webster.com, https://github.com/rmw

Daniel Shiffman:
Assistant Arts Professor, Interactive Telecommunications Program, NYU Tisch School of the Arts
Daniel Shiffman works as an Associate Arts Professor at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. Originally from Baltimore, Daniel received a BA in Mathematics and Philosophy from Yale University and a Master's Degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Program. He works on developing tutorials, examples, and libraries for Processing, the open source programming language and environment created by Casey Reas and Ben Fry. He is the author of Learning Processing: A Beginner's Guide to Programming Images, Animation, and Interaction and The Nature of Code (self-published via Kickstarter), an open source book about simulating natural phenomenon in Processing. more: http://shiffman.net

 

Art of the Networked Practice | Online Symposium

 

March 31 – April 2, 2015
http://oss.adm.ntu.edu.sg/symposium2015/

Presented by the NTU School of Art, Design & Media
Co-chaired by Randall Packer & Vibeke Sorensen
In Association with Furtherfield | London

The Art of the Networked Practice | Online Symposium is an international gathering exploring emergent forms of networked research, artistic production, and teaching in the arts. Intended as a global and inclusive gathering, without registration fees, the symposium unites local and remote speakers and audiences via Web-conferencing from around the world to discuss a range of topics, including: distributed teaching and studio models, collective research, peer-to-peer cultural production, networked performance, big data cultural analytics, and a broad array of issues in Internet art & culture. The Art of the Networked Practice | Online Symposium brings together artists, educators, theorists, and scholars from universities, art schools, museums, alternative art spaces, and other cultural institutions to capture the range and diversity of current networked practices in the arts.

Keynotes:
Steve Dixon, JonCates, Peter Looker, Lev Manovich

Panelists:
Tim White, Anne Balsamo, Deborah Howes, David A. Ross, Anne-Marie Schleiner, Marc Garrett, Ruth Catlow, Alex Adriaansens, Juan Camilo González, Charlotte Frost, Melinda Rackham, McKenzie Wark

Live Webcam Cyberformance:
New work by Helen Varley Jamieson with NTU students

Networked Installation:
Data visualization by Juan Camilo González

The NetArtizens Project:
Created by Furtherfield with Nick Briz, Joseph Yølk Chiocchi

Visit the Website for full symposium details:
http://oss.adm.ntu.edu.sg/symposium2015/

Sponsored by the NTU School of Art, Design & Media
Centre for Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (CLASS)
Teaching, Learning and Pedagogy Division | EdeX