Tag Archives: performance

A Normal Future – Interview with NORMALS

Normals is a collective whose work crosses a number of boundaries. Perhaps their work is a proposal that the boundaries we once found useful in defining creative practice don’t work as well in our connected/networked/hybrid cultures. What do the spaces between design, digital studio practice, networked art, and Internet Art look like? What do the spaces between fiction, abstraction, and social media performance look like? What do the spaces between the real, the virtual, and the augmented look like? It isn’t easy to define through traditional categories what artists create in our contemporary visual culture more broadly and definitely challenging with the work of Normals in particular.
I met Normals in 2012 at the 2nd International Computer Art Congress in Paris, where their physical bodies live and work. Since that time they have continued to produce multifaceted speculative works of multiple disciplinary categories. In the past several months, they have been promoting a new work - APPAREL. Our interview focuses on that work but is ongoing.
# Hi Normals - for our readers not familiar with your work, tell us about APPAREL. The work has a number of parts - how do they fit together?
APPAREL is a piece of clothing designed to co-exist in the digital and physical spaces. It comes as a polygonal black cape, and an iOS application allowing the wearer to see the piece’s digital counterpart, in augmented reality. The cape itself is as minimalistic as its digital overlay is complex and refined. The digital model is generated through a text analysis of the wearer's Twitter feed, evolving in real time, and creates a unique piece of clothing, as an info-graphic, an incarnation of the wearer's online personality.
Being a speculative studio working on anticipation, we like to imagine what a world where our “products” are widespread would look like, and for that specific reason we tend to pair our projects with loads of fiction, describing hypothetical users, and their relationship to theses objects in a future where they have become… well… normal. So, for APPAREL, not only did we make a functional product (with the coding help of Julien “V3ga” Gachadoat), but we also imagined a future fashion show, a fashion contest, in which everybody wears an Apparel and competes over their digital personalities.
This has been the subject to a short story, a video depicting one of the contestants (3PLUS3MAKE5), a soundtrack generated from the contestants’ profiles, and a faux-documentary depicting fashion’s transfer over to the digital realm.
The work is speculative, but it is also about things that are currently happening and developing in Arts/Tech environments.  What do you think are some of the more interesting directions in creative culture today?
Everything speculative is about something currently happening! Honestly, there are many interesting aspects to the evolution of arts, tech, and fashion, but we decided to focus on one question that has driven the entire project: “what would our clothes look like if they became digital?” Considering AR as a potential technology to display a data-based esthetic layer over physical things, it seemed obvious that all things esthetic would transit to this reactive and polymorphous layer of contextual information. On the other hand, the physical piece of clothing had to be reduced to a simple protective piece of fabric, a pedestal for its glorious digital overlay.
But to answer your question, we feel anything can be interesting as long as it doesn’t fall into the trap of “fascination.” The role of artists, designers, or “futurists” is to look at what tomorrow might bring without being so fascinated by their subject that they transform critical thinking into wishful thinking without even knowing it. “What will [insert something] look like in the future?” is always a valid question, as long as the answer isn’t “flying cars” or “eternal life.” No one should look at innovation as something purely good or purely bad: whatever’s interesting lies in the middle.
APPAREL had/has a number of contestants - Users creating and sharing their fashion/design - what are some of your favorites?
We love them all! When imagining a product or an object, it’s always extremely fun to imagine the people interacting with it, whether it is as “hackers” of the system, or people full of admiration for the “progress” it stands for, it is one of the main focuses of our practice: imaginary users for speculative objects.
All the characters described in the story are representative of  an “attitude” towards digital fashion: the main character, Abdlcroco, is a competitor who only runs after achievements, while Mangel is seeking for the perfect performance, and 3PLUS3MAKE5 cultivates eye-candies to satisfy her audience’s craving for fun and cute things. Duall is probably the most intriguing character though, being someone who doesn’t care about this fashion contest, but comes to watch it every day, and is, despite his efforts to make people believe he doesn’t care, part of this system too.
A question for one of the contestants - is AbdlCroco available? 
He is.
Screen Shot 2016-04-18 at 10.11.32 AM
AbdlCroco - you used to be one of the top ranked contestants - tell our readers about one of your most highly rated designs - what was it like? What did the crowd think?
What I do is very personal. Whatever I feel like on the moment, I just turn it into a situational dance that spits epileptic graphics right into the viewer’s ‘i’. But if I have to chose one… I’d say back when I was Number Six or something. There was this one time… See, I made these bunky prisms that would go boom-boom-boom in your face as the bass in the soundtrack — the most epic collection of the deepest, darkest, fattest bass samples you could find on the Stream — also went boom-boom-boom. Even the floor looked like it was shaking, with all the lines blinking up and down looted from SK000N’s template — you know the one I’m talking about, right? So I had all this set up, and as I stepped on stage, there was some kind of power shutdown or something, and all the lights went out, and it was so in sync with my show that every frenz thought it was all planned. But truly it wasn’t. Just got lucky. And frenz digged my stuff so hard they remained silent throughout the whole thing, and I even got a standing ovation — well, the “standing” part doesn’t count though, everyone was standing already. But still got an ovation. That one was the best. Got straight to number 4 after that. But that was another time…
AbdlCroco - what do you think of Mangel’s fashion? His work seems to be on top lately - what does the crowd like about Mangel?
Allow me to speak frankly: Mangel’s a joke! Every single day Trudent welcomes a fashion show, with rules, RULES — you are judged on your LOOKS. The performance has now become a part of the show, and I’m okay with that: you should be able to display your outfit in the best manner possible. But what I HATE is frenz who use the performance to go hypno on the audience, to a point where they’re not even looking at the ONLY thing they should be looking at. Mangel’s just a comedian, he acts, makes people laugh, but no one sees that he just copies everyone else, and never comes up with ANYTHING NEW. Yet people like him, so they vote for him, and he remains there, everyday, trolling his way to the top.
 Normals - Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts with us, we look forward to seeing what happens next!

Upcoming Events: IMRC at University of Maine

Located on the University of Maine Campus the Innovative Media, Research and Commercialization Center (IMRC Center), at Stewart Commons, is a 15,000+ square foot facility provides comfortable, state of the art prototyping facilities, audio and video production spaces, a resource library, performance and installation spaces, classrooms, and offices. IMRC is outfitted with a variety of tools and equipment, including a full shop, 3D printers and 3D scanner, computer controlled machine tools, a cutting and engraving laser, plastic vacuum former, large format printers, a range of design and production software, electronics workbenches, video and still cameras, audio recording and mixing equipment, and a variety of tools for supporting interactive environments and installations.

Opened in 2013, the IMRC Center is a hub for learning, creating and producing. It is the most recent of the portfolio of the University of Maine’s facilities that support innovation and economic development. The IMRC Center is supported by a range of expert instructors and a community of collaborators. Visit http://www.imrccenter.com/, where you can find information on the facility, programs and events.

The IMRC has several upcoming events:

FREE movie night at IMRC Center: "Fantastic Planet" On Tuesday, April 5 at 7p.m. the IMRC will host a free and public screening of Fantastic Planet as a part of Tuesday’s at the IMRC, the UMaine Intermedia MFA program’s visiting artist lecture series. Fantastic Planet  is a 1973 cutout stop motion science fiction film by French writer and artist René Laloux. The animated epic that is by turns surreal and lovely, fantastic and graceful, can be seen as allegorical of the relationship between various groups of humans, as well as between humans and animals, drawing on the themes of racism and speciesism. Fantastic Planet is recognizable for its dreamy, psychedelic imagery, that is backed by a soundtrack composed by Alain Goraguer.

Experimental Avant-Garde Music Performance at UMaine: Experimental avant-garde musician id m theft able will perform for the UMaine community on Tuesday, April 12 at 7p.m. as a part of Tuesdays at the IMRC. This concert is free and open to the public. id m theft able performs within and without the realms of noise, avant improvisation, sound poetry, and performance using voice, found objects, electronics, and whatever else is available. He has given hundreds of performances across 4 continents in settings ranging from the humblest of squats to the fanciest of festivals. The hear samples of id m theft able’s work, visit https://idmtheftable.bandcamp.com

FREE Brown Bag Workshop Series: The IMRC invites you to participate in a free workshop series utilizing the unique array of technology that the IMRC has to offer to the residents of the state of Maine. The IMRC serves as a technology and start up incubator for our local communities by providing training and and opening up access to cutting edge technology. This workshop series is free and will run on Thursdays and Fridays at 12:00pm from April 7 - April 29th. Feel free to bring your lunch! Topics covered will include 3D scanning and printing, textile art, photo and video, social media, music and sound, video editing and much more. For a complete list of workshops and sign up information, please visit http://www.imrccenter.com/workshops.

 

FEBRUARY 2016 ARRAYLIST THEME: Performance [experimental, durational, networked] –> NEW MEDIA PEDAGOGY OF THE [ ]

We are happy to announce the upcoming ArrayList discussion theme:
Performance [experimental, durational, networked]
starts February 1, 2016

ArrayList series details here: http://arrayproject.com/content/discussion

Subscribe here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/arraylist

The purpose of the ArrayList year-long series is to connect new media artists, designers, educators, theorists, producers, activists, and organizers while facilitating critical discussion about foundation level new media pedagogy and context (both inside and outside traditional academic structures). For those new to the listserv format, a listserv is an archived asynchronous thread of email conversation. Subscribe to the listserv so that you can read [fly-on-the-wall is a-ok AKA lurking] and/or respond to the written activity, and read the archives. As always we hope to engage a wide range of critical perspectives so please chime in with thoughts and questions. Sincerely, j.duran, Adam Trowbridge, Jessica Parris Westbrook, ARRAY[ ] founders

Performance [experimental, durational, networked]:
with guest thread leaders: Thomas Albrech, Amy Alexander, L[3]^2 (Lee Blalock), Ricardo Dominguez, Kirsten Leenaars, Ellen Mueller, Heather Warren-Crow, Jorge Rojas, Angela Washko

Thomas Albrecht (State University of New York at New Paltz)
Thomas Albrecht’s performance projects have explored ritual and language in public spaces, galleries, and museums, prodding cultural beliefs and individual doubts. Current interests involve duration and elements of Absurdist Theatre, laying bare contingency in human constructions and slippage between truth and fiction. Albrecht has performed throughout the United States and internationally, notably at Grace Exhibition Space, Defibrillator Performance Art Gallery, Panoply Performance Laboratory, Dimanche Rouge Paris, the Queens Museum, and during festivals such as the Brooklyn International Performing Arts Festival, Month of Performance Art Berlin, and Performatorio, IV Muestra de Arte Duracional in the Dominican Republic. He received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, a Master of Arts in Religion from Yale University where he served as the Menil Scholar in residence, and his MFA from the University of Washington. He serves as Assistant Dean in the School of Fine & Performing Arts, and Associate Professor in the Art Department at the State University of New York at New Paltz.

Amy Alexander (University of California, San Diego)
Amy Alexander is a digital media, audiovisual and performance artist who has also worked in film, video, music, tactical media and information technology. She has been making films since 1990 and creating art through programming since 1994. Much of Alexander’s work is performance-­based, often working at intersections of cinema, performing arts, humor, politics, and popular culture. Her current research and practice focuses on expanded approaches to the moving image that reflect contemporary cultural and technological shifts. Alexander has performed and exhibited internationally in clubs and on the street as well as in festivals, museums and on the Internet. She has written and lectured on software art, software as culture, and audiovisual performance, and she has served as a reviewer for festivals and commissions for digital media art, video, and computer music. She was a founding organizer of the runme.org software repository, and she has done residencies at The Media Centre in Huddersfield, UK, and the iota Center in Los Angeles. She is an Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego. More information at: http://amy-alexander.com

L[3]^2 (Lee Blalock) (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
Lee Blalock is an artist who considers what it may mean to live in a future somewhere between here and nowhere. Her research began when she was a kid and would visit her father at his job as a computer programmer / operator. Rules and systems are inherent to her process, while her imagination leans toward the N3w Hum4n. Lee uses her work to create new origin stories, visual or written, which are influenced by a life long interest in speculative fiction and science fiction. Having moved fluidly from an undergraduate STEM education to a career in design and production, she eventually found that all of her conceptual and technical interests converge in the fine arts. The artist makes work using text, performance, computational video and sound, electronics and drawing. Many ideas behind Lee's work attempts to describe the future human, replacing the failed language around identity with the self-constructed and amplified self. This new body (or "NeueBody") often takes the form of abstraction and presents a mix of algorithmic and heuristic behavior. In all cases, Lee's work represents the physical, computational, or behavioral body and uses repetition as a strategy to move past the automatic and into something transformative. As an arts educator, Lee's research is specific to topics referring to the posthuman, systems and cybernetics. She received her Bachelor of Science (Chemistry and Math) from Spelman College and an Associates of Arts (Design) from Bauder College. In 2011, Lee received her Master of Fine Arts from The School of the Art Institute, where she currently teaches in multiple departments. Lee writes and performs under the alphanumeric moniker of L[e]^2. She can be found walking a tightrope in the center of a holographic sphere.

Ricardo Dominguez (University of California, San Diego)
Ricardo Dominguez is a co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group who developed virtual sit-in technologies in solidarity with the Zapatistas communities in Chiapas, Mexico, in 1998. His recent Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab project ( http://bang.transreal.org/) with Brett Stalbaum, Micha Cardenas, Amy Sara Carroll, and Elle Mehrmand, the Transborder Immigrant Tool (a GPS cell phone safety net tool for crossing the Mexico/US border) was the winner of “Transnational Communities Award” (2008), an award funded by Cultural Contact, Endowment for Culture Mexico–US and handed out by the US Embassy in Mexico. It also was funded by CALIT2 and the UCSD Center for the Humanities. The Transborder Immigrant Tool has been exhibited at the 2010 California Biennial (OCMA), Toronto Free Gallery, Canada (2011), The Van Abbemuseum, Netherlands (2013), ZKM, Germany (2013), as well as a number of other national and international venues. The project was also under investigation by the US Congress in 2009-2010 and was reviewed by Glenn Beck in 2010 as a gesture that potentially “dissolved” the U.S. border with its poetry. Dominguez is an associate professor at the University of California, San Diego, in the Visual Arts Department, a Hellman Fellow, and Principal/Principle Investigator at CALIT2 and the Performative Nano-Robotics Lab at SME, UCSD. He also is co-founder of *particle group*, with artists Diane Ludin, Nina Waisman, Amy Sara Carroll, whose art project about nano-toxicology entitled *Particles of Interest: Tales of the Matter Market* has been presented at the House of World Cultures, Berlin (2007), the San Diego Museum of Art (2008), Oi Futuro, Brazil (2008), CAL NanoSystems Institute, UCLA (2009), Medialab-Prado, Madrid (2009), E-Poetry Festival, Barcelona, Spain (2009), Nanosférica, NYU (2010), and SOMA, Mexico City, Mexico (2012): http://hemisphericinstitute.org/hemi/en/particle-group-intro.

Kirsten Leenaars (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
Kirsten Leenaars’ creates participatory video and performance based work. In her practice Leenaars engages with specific people and communities. Her work oscillates between fiction and documentation, reinterprets personal stories and reimagines everyday realities through staging, improvisation and iteration. She examines the very nature of our own constructed realities, the stories we tell our selves and the ones we identify with and explores the way we relate to others. Recent projects include producing a series of 3 performances Notes on Empty Chairs, about loss, community and empathy for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago; creating the video #thisistomorrow with Washington DC based performers in response to the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner; and producing the science fiction film: The Invasion of the Hairy Blobs, currently edited at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, amongst others at: Museo Universitaro del Chopo, Mexico City, DCAC, Washington DC, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Glass Curtain Gallery, Threewalls, Gallery 400, 6018 North, and Elaine L. Jacob Gallery, Detroit, Printed Matter, New York, the Wexner Center, Columbus, and at the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, Kunst Fabrik, Munchen, and Bethanien Haus, Berlin. She has been rewarded grants from the Mondrian Foundation, The Propeller Fund, the department of Culturall Affairs, Chicago, the Dutch Art Foundation and multiple cultural grants from the Dutch Consulate in New York.

Ellen Mueller (West Virginia Wesleyan College)
Exhibiting works nationally and internationally, Ellen Mueller explores hyperactive news media and corporate management systems via work in a variety of media including, but not limited to, performance, 3D printing, and drawing. Recent residencies include Ox-Bow, Virginia Center for Creative Art where she was a Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation Creative Fellow, Nes Artist Residency (Iceland), Coast Time (May 2016), and Signal Culture (August 2016). Mueller currently lives and works in Buckhannon WV as an Assistant Professor of Art at West Virginia Wesleyan College. She received her MFA in Studio Art from University of South Florida. She completed a BA in Theatre and Art, and a BS in Design Technology from Bemidji State University. Additionally, she has obtained performance training at Dell'Arte International and the Brave New Institute (now known as the Brave New Workshop Student Union). Mueller is contracted with Oxford University Press to publish a foundational art textbook entitled "Elements and Principles of 4D Art and Design", due out February 2016.

Heather Warren-Crow (Texas Tech University)
Heather Warren-Crow, assistant professor of interdisciplinary arts and affiliated faculty in women's studies, is a scholar of media and performance as well as an artist. Her interdisciplinary scholarship centers on the aesthetics of subjectivity in the 19th-21st centuries. She has given sustained attention to the body in analog and digital animation, discourses of adolescence in fine art and popular media, the art of affective labor, and the agency of objects, images, and sounds. Dr. Warren-Crow's first book, Girlhood and the Plastic Image, was recently published by Dartmouth College Press. Dr. Warren-Crow's teaching interests span music, theatre, dance, film, and visual art. She has areas of expertise in intermedia (especially performance art, sound art, and screendance); puppetry, movement-based, and multimedia performance; theatrical design; video and internet art; photography theory; performance studies; cinema and media studies; girlhood studies; gender studies; and vocal aesthetics.

Jorge Rojas (Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City)
Born in Morelos, Mexico, Jorge Rojas is a multidisciplinary artist, curator, and art educator. He studied Art at the University of Utah and at Bellas Artes in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. His work and curatorial projects have been exhibited across the US and internationally, including Museo del Barrio, Queens Museum of Art, White Box, and Grace Exhibition Space in New York; Museum of Latin American Art, The Mexican Museum, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, and MACLA in California; Project Row Houses and New World Museum in Houston; Diaspora Vibe Gallery in Miami; Utah Museum of Fine Arts and Utah Museum of Contemporary Art in Salt Lake City; Ex Convento del Carmen in Guadalajara; and FOFA Gallery in Montreal. He has received grants and fellowships from National Performance Network, Experimental Television Center, and Vermont Studio Center. He is the Founding Director of Low Lives, an international, multi-venue live streaming performance festival that was founded in 2009. Rojas is director of education and engagement at the UMFA in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Angela Washko (Carnegie Mellon University)
Angela Washko is an artist, writer and facilitator devoted to creating new forums for discussions of feminism in the spaces most hostile toward it. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Since 2012, Washko has operated as The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft - an ongoing intervention on communal language formation inside the most popular massively multi-player online role playing game of all time. A recent recipient of The Frank-Ratchye Fund for Art at the Frontier Grant from the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, a Franklin Furnace Performance Fund Grant, a Creative Time Report commission, a Rhizome Internet Art Microgrant, a Danish International Visiting Artist Grant and the Terminal Award, Washko’s practice has been highlighted in Art in America, Frieze Magazine, Time Magazine, The Guardian (UK), ArtForum, ARTnews, VICE, Hyperallergic, Rhizome, the New York Times, The Creator’s Project, Dazed and Confused Magazine, Digicult, ArtInfo, Bad At Sports and more. Her projects have been presented nationally and internationally at venues including Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art (Helsinki, Finland), Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, Moving Image Art Fair (London and NYC), the Rotterdam International Film Festival, Institute for Contemporary Art Boston and Bitforms Gallery in NYC. Washko’s work is featured in the recently published book “Mass Effect: Art and the Internet in the 21st Century” from The New Museum and MIT Press.

Assistant Professor of Performance & Technology at Texas A&M University

The Department of Performance Studies at Texas A&M University, College Station invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Performance Studies. Candidates will have a research and/or creative program in performance studies with an emphasis in music, sound, media, and/or theatre technology.

The successful candidate will be expected to teach graduate and undergraduate courses on the techniques, aesthetics, and literature of technology-based performance, supervise B.A. and M.A. research projects, maintain a nationally recognized profile in research/creative activity, participate in faculty governance, and contribute to the intellectual life of the Department. Standard teaching load is 2/2 with high expectations for research/creative activity.

Applicants will have completed a Ph.D. or doctoral-level terminal degree in Performance
Studies or an allied field such as Media Arts, Music, Sound Studies, or Theatre. A program of research/creative activity that demonstrates potential for continued impact and is consistent with expectations of a research intensive university is essential. Proficiency with hardware, software, and programming languages in areas of expertise is desirable.To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, evidence of teaching success, and three letters of recommendation to Dr. Donnalee Dox, Performance and Technology Search (dox@tamu.edu). Additional materials may be requested. Review of applications begins on November 1, 2015. The position is open until filled.

The Department of Performance Studies is one of twelve academic departments in the College of Liberal Arts. The Department houses a B.A. and an M.A. in Performance Studies. Texas A&M University—College Station is an AAU member (Association of American Universities), with a Carnegie classification of RU/VH (Research Universities, Very High research activity). We are committed to building a culturally diverse and pluralistic faculty. Women, minorities, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply. Texas A&M is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. Texas is a Public Records state.

For more information, contact Dr. Donnalee Dox, dox@tamu.edu

The Department of Performance Studies at Texas A&M invites students to explore performance in all aspects of social life, and ask questions about the world through performance.

Dispatch from Vancouver – ISEA2015 Part 1

I'm a bit at a loss for words, but wanted to share a little bit as everything starts to take off here in Vancouver for ISEA2015. If you're around, you should try to catch up with me, but I know it's probably next to impossible with all the great things going on. Thanks so much to Simon Frasier University and just about all of Vancouver for the welcome and good vibez!

As I write this dispatch, I'm sitting at the venue waiting, excitedly for the Hakanaï performance to begin. I've heard a lot of great things about their work and am eagerly anticipating the show.   Hakanaï  are part of the Movement in Computing Workshop (MOCO) programming during the first few days at the symposium. This is of particular interest to me, as a MOCO participant, because of the combination of live realtime, audio/visual performance and installation. There is a lot happening in these vectors : the crossovers/intersections of the Arts and Technology. 

But this is really just the tip of the digital media practices in the proverbial cross-pollinating theory/practice oceans of contemporary technological experience. In the next several days there will be artists and scholars from across our planet aligning in Vancouver and mixing it all up. I'll be in and out of panels, papers, demos, posters, performances, screenings, and just about as much as I can handle. I promise to write a little more during and after it all. Maybe we'll cross paths - or if you want to cross paths and we didn't yet - I'll be at the Vancouver Art Gallery Opening for FUSE/DISRUPTION for sure (I've got something to show there) - hope to catch up with you!!!¡¡¡

--END DISPATCH

 

 

#ISEA2015 and #MOCO'15

A photo posted by a bill miller (@abillmiller) on

Art of the Networked Practice | Online Symposium

 

March 31 – April 2, 2015
http://oss.adm.ntu.edu.sg/symposium2015/

Presented by the NTU School of Art, Design & Media
Co-chaired by Randall Packer & Vibeke Sorensen
In Association with Furtherfield | London

The Art of the Networked Practice | Online Symposium is an international gathering exploring emergent forms of networked research, artistic production, and teaching in the arts. Intended as a global and inclusive gathering, without registration fees, the symposium unites local and remote speakers and audiences via Web-conferencing from around the world to discuss a range of topics, including: distributed teaching and studio models, collective research, peer-to-peer cultural production, networked performance, big data cultural analytics, and a broad array of issues in Internet art & culture. The Art of the Networked Practice | Online Symposium brings together artists, educators, theorists, and scholars from universities, art schools, museums, alternative art spaces, and other cultural institutions to capture the range and diversity of current networked practices in the arts.

Keynotes:
Steve Dixon, JonCates, Peter Looker, Lev Manovich

Panelists:
Tim White, Anne Balsamo, Deborah Howes, David A. Ross, Anne-Marie Schleiner, Marc Garrett, Ruth Catlow, Alex Adriaansens, Juan Camilo González, Charlotte Frost, Melinda Rackham, McKenzie Wark

Live Webcam Cyberformance:
New work by Helen Varley Jamieson with NTU students

Networked Installation:
Data visualization by Juan Camilo González

The NetArtizens Project:
Created by Furtherfield with Nick Briz, Joseph Yølk Chiocchi

Visit the Website for full symposium details:
http://oss.adm.ntu.edu.sg/symposium2015/

Sponsored by the NTU School of Art, Design & Media
Centre for Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (CLASS)
Teaching, Learning and Pedagogy Division | EdeX

Call for Proposals VISION’R VJ Festival 2015

The next Vision'R VJ Festival, 10 years of Vision'R  ! (may/june period) is now accepting proposals ! Past Vision'R video reports : http://www.vision-r.org/?page_id=1371

Call is open until February 15 (midnight)

Find this call on our website : http://www.vision-r.org/?page_id=970

Send the proposals by mail (2 maximum /artist-krew, with download link if necessary) to :
vision-r (at) reseaux-creation.org - with "Vision'R 2015" as mail object.

With a presentation text, artistic purpose, technical sheet, stage view, and photos/videos. Please send us these filled documents (with other materials if you want)

http://www.vision-r.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/PROJECT2015-VisionR.rtf
http://www.vision-r.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/TECHNIQUE2015-VisionR.doc