Tag Archives: residency

Call for Cultural Capital Producers for New Residency in WA

In collaboration with Washington State University, artist and educator Peter Christenson has initiated a cultural capital scholar residency in Richland, WA and is currently seeking proposals from creatives with diverse backgrounds and research agendas to participate in the community-based residency. Innovative and socially conscious scholars and practitioners working in a variety of fields and industries including the visual arts, architecture, engineering, urban planning, social work, design and media arts, creative writing & literature, culinary arts, etc. are encouraged to apply.

Selected residents will stay at the “Guest House,” a living-learning community of Washington State University in Richland, WA for a short-term period of 1 week – 1 month based on proposal, room availability, and project objectives. Proposals should seek to connect to and build the cultural capital of the Tri-Cities area, a metropolitan community in eastern Washington. Residents will be invited to lead an educational/creative event/activity/lecture open to WSU students and the community at large and donate a piece of research/art to the GH Cultural Capital permanent collection. There is no fee to apply and housing for the scholar will be covered for the duration of the residency.

To apply, please email a CV, link to portfolio / research, and a 2-page (maximum) proposal to GHCC Residency Director Peter Christenson with subject heading “GHCC Residency.” Applications are on a rolling basis; proposals should be sent to: peter.christenson@wsu.edu

Fermenting at Flux: Live and Active Cultures (Part 3)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence and Visiting Assistant Professor, Haverford College

Over the course of my residency at Flux Factory in Long Island City, New York, I am recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers), as well as outside artists collaborating with Flux for its various public programs. Through its studio residency program, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.

For this interview, Christina invited Caitlin Foley and Misha Rabinovich, faculty at UMASS Lowell, to talk about their ongoing project, Total Jump. Artspace in New Haven, CT commissioned Foley and Rabinovich to present Total Jump for Game On! on view at the Goffe Street Armory, October 15 and 16 from 12-6pm.

CF: Tell me about your project for New Haven City-Wide Open Studios

Misha: We are creating a multiplayer game that facilitates a worldwide coordinated jump. This came out of the idea that we could cause a massive earthquake if we organize everyone to land in unison. The near impossibility of accomplishing a Total Jump and the ease and fun of training for it invites the audience to bridge the gap between a postmodern pluralistic world and the necessity of global coordinated actions in the face of the Anthropocene.

Caitlin: The first version of Total Jump Training was a one to two player game where participants time their jump to land on zero. This was included in A Wicked Problem at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts. To help create a playful energetic environment our friends Gold Bikini wrote Jump Up!, which has lyrics about the concept, specifically for Total Jump. For Game On! we are excited to present an eight player, immersive installation of Total Jump where participants stand in a circle facing both the animated projection and each other.

Misha: We also released the first version of the Total Jump Live phone app (available for iOS/Android) to coincide with City-Wide Open Studios, which people are using to practice jumping, and for us to send notifications for global jumps.

CF: I realize that Total Jump functions as a metaphor. Do you joke about how this technology could be applied to larger societal movements?

Misha: For us it started out as a joke, but since then it has been exhibited at EFA Project Space in NYC, and Boston Cyberarts Gallery, among others.  The fact that people actually want to try it means that it is entering into the non-ironic territory.

Caitlin: In some cases we were amazed that people love this as much as they do. It has been really fun and heartwarming to see.

Misha:  There are also instances where this jump has been attempted. MythBusters organized a group jump at the Stewart & Colbert Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear in 2010 and calculated how much meat would hit the ground, using seismic measurements.

CF: How does this work relate to the rest of your artistic practice and other artists’ work that inspire you?

Caitlin: Total Jump connects to some of the ideas evident in our mobile sauna project. We were thinking about neighborliness and noting that people in our culture often don’t get to know their neighbors unless there is a disaster — whether large or small. We wanted to contribute to creating a culture of neighborliness that is not dependent on calamity. We may be in the midst of the sixth extinction, but people don't necessarily feel the depth of this. This jumping game creates a bonding experience in a fun and playful way that’s accessible and connects these ideas for us.

Misha: The Estonian singing revolution is an historic example. This was a series of events that led to Estonia’s exit from the USSR. People held hands along the Estonian border and sang together, and throughout the country groups would burst out into song to be in solidarity with each other, as a way to remember their heritage. It creatively led them back to independence. Another example is an action by Christoph Schlingensief, the German performance artist & theatre director. He invited people to take part in an anti-chancellor swim in lake Wolfgang, Austria. Four million bathers were organized to enter the water, with the intention of raising the water level and flooding the area. The idea is that the critical mass would overwhelm the conditions, and cause a paradigm shift in some way. Law enforcement prevented the demonstration from taking place.

CF:  A lot of times we talk about future potentiality in a very abstract way. Those historical precedents validate the real possibilities of creative work.  Have you thought about doing any programming along with Total Jump to build on larger ideas of collective action?

Caitlin: For me there is still enough openness in the piece that it can be ironic while it is also sincere. In one of the animations for Total Jump characters surround the world, jump and then the world breaks. Joint action can be a powerful and positive tool, however, one of the reasons we are experiencing climate change is mass action. For example, there are an immense number of people driving cars and contributing to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. There is a dual interpretation: the jump can symbolize coming together for the greater good and also the impact we as a species are having on the earth.

Misha: The anthropocene has come, but we don’t really know what that is. Intellectually we can know it, but we don’t feel the power of that collective agency. It reminds me of Player Piano, by Kurt Vonnegut. It takes place in a techno-dystopia, inspired by his work at GE. At the end there is a cataclysm. Everyone destroys the technology and then out of this total revolt, people are bored. One of the characters starts to fiddle around with broken pieces of technology and makes a little automated thing for entertainment, and everyone is really into it, starting the cycle again. In our animation the earth cracks and then another earth comes out of it. We wanted to stage a poetic interpretation of the anthropocene, and ask where our cultural power is leading us.

CF: Earlier this summer we talked about the debate between Claire Bishop and Grant Kester regarding antagonism. For a work to be successful does it need to be shocking or aggressive?

Misha: Well everyone jumping at once and causing an earthquake could be pretty catastrophic. The geologists we have spoken with say it is unlikely, unless we lined everyone up at the San Andreas and other fault lines. From the Grant Kester point of view, maybe it could lead to advocating for other actions that bring us all together. Any infrastructure that builds synchronicity, like the one enabled via our app, could easily be instrumentalized for different goals, however. We are open to that though, and people should get in touch if they want to schedule a global jump to coincide with their needs, for example during an event, and hopefully get a worldwide audience.

CF: Technology can have a way of over-inflating how important we feel socially, and yet we still might not believe that we can affect anything within a political spectrum. The proposed image of people lining up on a fault line is really powerful. It reminds me of the Francis Alÿs piece, When Faith Move Mountains. It’s exciting to think that something very physical could result from the otherwise intangible experience of engaging with tech.

Caitlin: The phone app offers the possibility for people to jump no matter where they are. People around the world can jump simultaneously.  Potentially they can jump across the room from each other and see each other in the real world, therefore forming a bond. We are interested in the complex social issues within this intersection of physical and technological experience. Even during an installation of the training game, one of the gallery assistants was a little nervous about jumping and seemed to feel ridiculous. People have reservations about how they appear taking an action. The way people use the app could be really interesting. If you get a notification when you are walking down the street, would you stop and jump?

CF: I think this brings up the public/private dichotomy. We live so much of our lives online- we might feel comfortable engaging politically in the online realm, but hesitate to go out and protest in the street. The two actions feel really different, but one can affect the other. There is still a certain power and presence to the physical world.

Caitlin: What’s exciting in the phone app is the possibility of existing in both spaces simultaneously.

BIO
Caitlin Foley and Misha Rabinovich work collaboratively as artists and curators to create works which engage ideas and practices involving sharing communities, livable ecologies, and the transmutation of waste. Among other things they create interactive games, installations, and happenings where audience participation is a key component of the work and its message. Projects such as their DS Institute Sweat Battery actively creates/engages a sharing community through the collection of sweat from participants using our mobile sauna, presents an alternative ecology for energy production, and transforms sweat “waste” into power to charge cell phones and symbolize collective energy. Their work has been exhibited in the US, Canada, and Europe at such venues as EFA Project Space (NYC), Flux Factory (NYC), the New Museum’s Ideas City Festival (NYC), Marymount California University (LA), the Torrance Art Museum in (LA), the Everson Museum of Art (Syracuse, NY), SIGGRAPH (LA), High Desert Test Sites HQ (Joshua Tree), Prague Biennale (Czech Republic), KCHUNG Radio (LA) and the Arts Center of the Capital Region (Troy, NY). Misha is an Assistant Professor of Interactive Media and Caitlin is part-time faculty in the Art and Design Department at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Call for Entries for Residencies at PACT Zollverein

PACT is as a developmental working and presentation space for contemporary performance art at the interface between science, technology and society. Alongside delivering a wide-ranging programme of performances and public events, PACT’s work is firmly rooted in it’s well-known residency programme and ongoing engagement with diverse forms of knowledge transfer. Within the scope of advanced research and development activities, PACT establishes ongoing project series and opens up spaces where society, the world and art interlink.

In Spring 2017 PACT is launching 1/2/8 a new, central and long-term research and development format with a special focus on the connection between knowledge and actions. The format offers substantial time and space for practices of cooperation between people, objects, space, technology and experimentation. The first chapter of 1/2/8 centres around the possibilities of intervention: How can we implement changes in or outside of static systems of thought and organization? How can we foresee, develop and connect alternative forms of action? What kind of resources, possibilities, opportunities and spaces of action do we need?

To take an in-depth look at these questions, we are inviting artists, scientists, journalists and experts from other varied fields of knowledge, to work in our studios in May 2017 and enter into dialogue and experiments with one another during symposia, idea labs, talks, lectures, workshops and public gatherings and presentations. Supported by temporary research fellowships, those taking part will actively contribute to the shape and substance of PACT’s key areas of activity as a research platform, artists’ centre and performance venue. Ideas and issues raised during research stays will be debated within the framework of public events and performances.

A RESIDENCY CAN INCORPORATE THE FOLLOWING

  • Studio space (from 69 to 173 sq. m.)
  • Local accommodation (max. 6 people)
  • Weekly grant allowance of 500"€ for all of the residency project participants (max. 6 people)
  • Travel costs covering one journey only per participant to and from PACT Zollverein (subject to prior agreement)
  • Technical equipment (by arrangement and subject to availability)
  • Possible lectures, workshops, exhibitions or performances (at short notice and subject to agreement) ONLINE APPLICATIONS REQUIRE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION
  • A proposed research project (max. 1000 characters including spaces)
  • short chronological CV for everyone involved in the project (max. 2000 characters)

We welcome applications with links to prior artistic or scientific work. We only accept residency applications submitted via our online residency application process. To access the online application form please go to our online application system. All complete applications received by this date will be considered and you will be informed of the decision by e-mail.

If you have any questions or would like to be included on our newsletter emailing list please send an email to: residenz@pact-zollverein.de.

The Artery Enters into Special Artistic Collaboration with Award Winning Video Artist Ronen Sharabani

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New York, NY, December 6, 2016 – Renowned Art + Technology company The Artery, which is actively expanding its award winning talent base by seeking the most talented digital artists in the world, has established a special artistic collaboration with acclaimed Video Artist Ronen Sharabani, a 2006 Cannes Gold Lion Prize winner. Vico Sharabani, The Artery’s Founder and Creative Director, as well as a brother of Ronen Sharabani, made the announcement.

This new collaboration between The Artery and Sharabani has been designed for two purposes:

  • To develop and present innovative and original Video Content to museums, art galleries, and other special artistic venues around the world; and
  • To integrate Virtual Reality and other new technologies into Ronen Sharabani’s upcoming art exhibits, installations, and live special events around the world.

Regarding this new collaboration with his brother, Vico Sharabani said, “We are extremely excited about our new relationship with Ronen, a digital artist with the highest caliber of talent! Working in tandem with him, this new collaboration will allow us the first time to really ‘show off’ our skills and expertise in the world of Art, as well as our unique and innovative capabilities in the world of Technology. Ronen will be conceiving, producing and presenting never-before-seen artistic installations and experiences all over the world.”

He adds, “We want our clients to know about this new collaboration because it exemplifies how The Artery can bring deep artistic conversation and experience to their advertising projects. This cross pollination of art plus technology is the DNA behind our company. Historically, we’ve delivered feature film level imagery to commercials and music videos, and the latest, interactive technologies to enhance advertising campaigns and experiential experiences. Our art plus technology expertise is what makes our company truly unique, as we bring this approach to all of our projects, large and small.”

Ronen Sharabani said, “My constant urge to create has allowed me to produce a number of well-received exhibits so far, but as a solo artist, there have always been limits to how far I could go by myself. The exciting new collaboration with The Artery allows me to make a major jump to the next level. The Artery is a very high-end post house that compliments my work process as we both combine art and technology in innovative ways. By joining forces, we break the borders and barriers of what has been possible so far within the worlds of digital art and VR. The Artery is truly a unique company, and Vico has always been a person who can stretch the limits of computers and their capabilities. He is a highly improvisational artist, has mastered the blending of Art and Technology, and can create imagery from the 5% of hidden software that you can’t easily get from plug-ins. I am really looking forward to see what the future will bring!”

The Artery’s new relationship with Ronen Sharabani adds to the company’s existing collaborations with other noted video artists whose works have been exhibited widely in galleries and museums in the United States, as well as China. These exhibitions include those seen at the Whitney Museum of Art, Mass Moca, The Contemporary Austin, Zhejiang Art Museum, Hangzhou China, and many more.

ABOUT UPCOMING & RECENT RONEN SHARABANI PROJECTS:

At present, Sharabani is preparing for his next solo art exhibition, which will take place at the Nahum Gutman Museum of Art in Tel Aviv starting on December 20th. Entitled “Snap to Grid,” Sharabani’s new work, which he calls a “Smart Exhibition,” will be comprised of imagery projections against a very large wall at the museum. “Snap to Grid” will include computer renderings and 3D environments which will also be translated to VR. Sharabani and The Artery hope to export this VR experience during early 2017, to a live installation located in New York’s Union Square. As such, people in New York will be able to experience the same imagery simultaneously with people physically located at the Gutman Museum in Tel Aviv.

In late September 2016, The Paul E. Singer Foundation sponsored a collaboration between Start-Up Nation Central and Artis to create an interactive showcase of the innovations in the Israeli art world and art-related technology solutions. The event, which featured a talk and presentation by Ronen Sharabani, was held at Sotheby’s New York, in front of an audience of more than 150 New-York collectors, art curators, and business related executives from the art industry, and was the first in a series of events.

Additionally, Sharabani, in conjunction with technology supplied to him by The Artery, also presented a large projected exhibit at the Contemporary Austin during May 2016. His exhibit was presented in celebration of the Driscoll Villa at Laguna Gloria’s hundred year anniversary. For the event, Sharabani created a site-specific outdoor and indoor video projection, entitled “Matchbox,” featuring Israeli dancer Iyar Elezra of the Batsheva Dance Company, with music by Avi Belleli. Matchbox’s running time was 15 minutes on a loop – the projection ran for two hours. For more info about this exhibition, please see: http://www.thecontemporaryaustin.org/event/ronen-sharabani/

Regarding Sharabani’s “Matchbox” exhibit in Austin, Andrea Mellard, the Director of Public Programs & Community Engagement with the Contemporary Austin Museum, said, “Ronen Sharabani transformed the museum’s well-known architecture using cutting-edge technology. The incredible projections of his project ‘Matchbox’ made familiar details hidden, while his powerful imagery seemed to emerge into three-dimensions. People who know and love the building could not believe their eyes.”

ABOUT RONEN SHARABANI:

Ronen Sharabani, a 2006 winner of the Cannes Gold Lion Prize for “Best Creative Commercial,” lives and works in Tel Aviv, Israel. Ritual, struggle, faith, and politics take center stage in his works, not for didactic purposes, but as the gateway for transformational experiences.

Profoundly influenced by his experiences in his home country of Israel, where his Israeli “survivalist” thinking has colored his artistic perceptions and POV, Sharabani’s films and videos blend movement, performance, architecture, and light into intensely visual and sensory projects. Musical scores, replete with chanting and techno-like sounds, often overlay Sharabani’s moving images, allowing his films to be at once secular and spiritual.

Sharabani’s recent Art Exhibitions include “Matchbox” at Austin’s Driscoll Villa in celebration of the Laguna Gloria’s hundred year anniversary (May 2016); his public installation entitled “Blocks,” a centerpiece at the Musrara Mix Festival in Jerusalem in 2015  and “Chairs,” another of his public installations, which was featured during “White Night” in Tel Aviv in 2014.

During the course of his career, Ronen Sharabani has worked for a number of film, advertising and production companies, including The Artery, McCann-Erickson, Dreamworks, and Gravity VFX/Tel Aviv. Sharabani was Lead Compositor on the 2012 film “A Late Quartet,” and was Flame Compositor on the 2008 film “Ghost Town. He also served as the On-Set Digital FX Supervisor, while working with Rhino FX, on John Sayles’s 2004 feature film, “Silver City.”

In 2015, Sharabani appeared as himself in the short documentary film interview “Art in Clubs.” He earned a Certificate as a graduate of the New York Studio School, which he attended from 1999-2003.

ABOUT THE ARTERY:

Based in New York City, The Artery is a highly regarded Art +Technology company that designs, creates and produces unique and compelling visual content across all screens. The company has established partnerships with iconic brands, ad agencies, and entertainment studios to create high profile and compelling visual content for feature films, TV programs, commercials, music videos and art installations.

Utilizing breakthrough technologies, The Artery’s uniquely talented, curated teams -- which include its Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality unit, led by Creative & Technical Director Ronen Taschum, and its Experiential arm, led by Creative Director Yaron Tsinman -- also create stunning virtual reality content, experiential brand events, and 360-degree experiences for clients around the globe. The Artery offers custom-tailored A-teams and production pipelines, focused solely on efficiently achieving outstanding results.

With its global perspective, top-tier talent, newest technologies and unlimited creative capabilities, The Artery has the proven expertise to efficiently deliver extraordinary content, branding, and multimedia experiences, worldwide.

For Further Information visit The Artery’s Social Media Sites:

Position in Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at University of Washington, Bothell

Organization: University of Washington, Bothell, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Bothell
Title : Artist in Residence, Lecturer, full-time, competitive recruitment, Senior Artist in Residence, Senior Lecturer, full-time
Search Number : AA21595

Position Details:
The University of Washington Bothell (UWB) seeks a dynamic scholar and educator who bridges theories and practices of interactive media and interdisciplinary research, with expertise in one or more of the following areas: human-centered design, creative coding, new media art, socially engaged design, speculative design, critical theory, queer and feminist design principles. Candidates should be prepared to teach studio/practice-based courses in interactive media design; the ideal candidate will be able to use an interdisciplinary approach that can account for how forms of difference such as race, gender, sexuality and ability are co-constituted through interactive media and design.

The successful candidate will provide collaborative leadership in the campus’s Interactive Media Design (IMD) major, which is jointly offered between the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences (IAS) and the division of Computing and Software Systems (CSS) in the School of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). The candidate’s faculty home will be in the School of IAS or the division of CSS in the School of STEM, as appropriate. Record of teaching excellence, evidence of commitment to working with diverse student and community populations, and Masters, MFA, MDes or Ph.D. are required are required at time of appointment. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The University of Washington Bothell houses an array of undergraduate and graduate programs, is located in the Seattle metropolitan area, and provides faculty members with access to the research and funding resources of the UW as a whole. Co-housed in the Schools of IAS and STEM, the major in IMD is part of a dynamic digital media production ecology on and off campus. Along with related degrees in IAS (media and communication studies; interdisciplinary arts) and STEM (applied computing), IMD educates students to become critical, collaborative, and creative media producers, artists, and designers. In this way, the major contributes to the campus’s broader commitment to the linkage of theory and practice through scholarship and curricula that are relevant to diverse student populations.

When hired through a national search, Lecturers and Artists-in-Residence are eligible for renewable multi-year appointments, promotion, and sabbatical, among other benefits available to full-time UW faculty members. For more information about the position, the IMD major, and the Schools of IAS and STEM, please visit the campus website (http://www.uwb.edu/).

University of Washington faculty members engage in teaching, research and service. Candidates should expect to teach at all levels of the undergraduate and graduate curriculum.

Diversity is a core value of University of Washington Bothell. We believe the power of diversity enriches all of us by exposing us to a range of ways to understand and engage with the world, identify challenges, and to discover, design and deliver solutions.

Application Instructions

Applications should include a letter addressing the candidate’s scholarly and pedagogical qualifications for the position; CV; research/creative work sample; and evidence of teaching success or teaching dossier. Please submit applications through InterFolio via this URL: http://apply.interfolio.com/39306 . Letters of recommendation will be requested of candidates who advance in the process. Preferred deadline: 27 January 2017.

University of Washington is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, age, protected veteran or disabled status, or genetic information.

The University of Washington Bothell is the fastest growing public university in the state of Washington. We provide a leading-edge student experience grounded in hands-on learning, close relationships with faculty members as teachers and mentors, and staff dedicated to student success. The academic work of the campus focuses on cross-disciplinary research and creative practice, connected learning, and community engagement. UW Bothell’s current enrollment is approximately 5,000 students. A majority of those students are first generation college attendees or are from underrepresented groups; approximately 92 percent are from Washington. Located in the Seattle metropolitan region, UW Bothell builds vibrant regional partnerships, creates and disseminates new knowledge, and prepares students for leadership in the state of Washington and beyond.

Fermenting at Flux: Live and Active Cultures (Part 2)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence

Over the course of my 5-month residency at Flux Factory in Long Island City, New York, I am recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers), as well as outside artists collaborating with Flux for its various public programs. Through its studio residency program, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.

For this interview, I invited Maya Jeffereis to talk about her current project, Fallout Shelter which stages a moral values exercise developed by the US Navy. Maya invited visitors to participate in the exercise at Flux Factory on July 14, as one of the featured collaborators for Interdependence DayFallout Shelter is on view at the Soho20 Gallery in Brooklyn until July 25 and the New Britain Museum of American Art through September 11. 

maya-jeffereis-fallout-shelter-2016

C: How did your Fallout Shelter project come about?
M: I found a U.S. Navy training manual at an abandoned military site in Puerto Rico. Inside was this exercise on moral values: a hypothetical apocalyptic scenario with ten people occupying a fallout shelter. As participants, you are on a civil defense committee appointed by the President and it's your job to decide which six occupants should remain in the shelter in order to rebuild society and which four have to leave, because there is only space for six. The exercise describes each occupant by very problematic statements that include information about age, race, gender, sexuality, profession, and ideology.

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Text taken from the fallout shelter exercise:

  1. Thirty-six year old female physician, known to be a confirmed racist.
  2. Marine drill instructor, 37, white, accused of brutality to recruits -- has a revolver.
  3. Black militant, 35 year old biological researcher (PhD).
  4. Biochemist, 62 years old, white male.
  5. Olympic athlete, 26, decathlon champion, Asian female.
  6. Hollywood starlet, 27 year old white female, known drug user.
  7. Third year male medical student -- homosexual, 28.
  8. Sixteen year old girl, pregnant, questionable IQ, high school dropout.
  9. Thirty year old Catholic priest, Hispanic.
  10. Thirty-eight year old carpenter, and “Mr. Fix-It” man. Served seven years for pushing narcotics, has been out of jail for 7 months.

C: How did you take the ideas from that document and transform them into a work?
M: The most interesting aspect of the exercise was the conversation about identity politics and values that it opened up. I invited participants to my studio to complete the exercise and make their own decisions about whom to keep and whom to remove. They improvised on camera playing three roles: a member of the civil defense committee discussing their decisions, an occupant they chose to keep, and an occupant they chose to get rid of. In the role of the fallout shelter occupants, they would make a video confessional speech about why they should remain in the shelter, with the idea that their speech would be sent to the civil defense committee making decisions.

C: How does the two-channel format influence our understanding of the content in the speeches?
M: The video is edited together with the civil defense committee members on the left channel and the fallout shelter occupants on the right. By having the same performer play three distinct roles, you get a conflict of interest. For example, you might see a member of the civil defense committee on the left talking about why we should get rid of the Hollywood Starlet but then on the right, you see the same performer making an argument in defense of herself. Many different performers play each of the occupants, so you might see 10 different performers playing the role of the Marine Drill Instructor. I wanted to create a collective identity for each of the 10 occupants that would represent the range of arguments for or against each occupant. This would expose latent biases, because you're having a very direct and open conversation about race and identity politics and your own values. You are also building your own conception of a utopia by doing this thought experiment of what it would mean to rebuild society. What kind of society are you building? What do you hope to bring to a new society and what do you wish to leave behind?

C: How many people participated and did they write their own scripts?
M: About 35 people participated in the video and all of the performers improvised their own parts. When directing the video, I offered some general guidelines but tried not to influence what they said because it was about what each person brought to their own performance.

C: You don’t guide them as to whether they should use their own value system or approach it like a philosophical exercise?
M: I’m interested in this gray area between the performance of the self and the performance of a character. Where do you draw the line between the two? When performing a character, you are calling on personal experiences and external experiences that you have observed or absorbed through culture and media and these experiences become internalized. When performing your own identity, I think of Erving Goffman’s research on how an individual acts differently in different contexts, constantly adapting to various situations. The question of real versus fictional can be asked of both the performer and the performed.

C: In reading the document, there is an absurdity to the exercise that makes it hard to take seriously, but there is something about watching people act it out that feels surreal and frightening in its plausibility.
M: I think of the occupants of the fallout shelter as archetypes: you have The Doctor, The Soldier, the Academic, The Athlete, The Movie Star, and so on. Each archetype may have varying degrees of relatability, depending on your own background. For example, the Female Physician is described as a “confirmed racist.” How do we interpret this information, especially when it seems to present a conflict of interest between a doctor who swears the Hippocratic Oath and a confirmed racist who may refuse to treat certain patients? When the participants play the occupants, they begin to humanize these characters, giving insight into their personalities, their flaws, and their motivations. Perhaps it’s this sense of empathy imbued in the performance or conveyed to the viewer that is unsettling, because we’re confronting morally ambiguous and ambivalent issues. But that’s the great thing about this thought experiment: it gets us to have very frank and candid discussions about difficult topics, like race, policing, and gun control--issues that we’re facing right at this very moment.

Maya Jeffereis is a video, performance, and installation artist based in New York. Her work has been shown most recently at SOHO20 Gallery, Flux Factory, and NARS Foundation. She holds a MFA from Hunter College and a BFA and BA from the University of Washington. Maya is also the Public Engagement Associate of Adult and Access Programs at the Guggenheim.

Christina Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Haverford College in Pennsylvania and currently an artist-in-residence at Flux Factory in New York.

 

Fermenting at Flux: Live & Active Cultures (Part 1)

Presented by Christina Freeman, Flux Factory artist-in-residence

Over the course of my 5-month residency at Flux Factory I will be recording a series of studio visits with other artists-in-residence (aka Fluxers). Through its studio residency program in Long Island City, NY, Flux Factory supports approximately 30 emerging artists each year from a range of creative disciplines and international locations. Flux commissions new work through quarterly exhibitions, and residents produce public events at a prolific pace.  The next exhibition opening on July 20th in Flux's gallery is "Thinking Like a Machine," by Niki Passath.

Interview with Niki Passath

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C: Tell me about your opening on July 20th.

N: It’s a hybrid event, both workshop and exhibition. The robotics workshop starts at noon and finishes when the opening reception begins, at 6pm. We will experiment with the machines we have made as a performance during the opening.

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C: What are the materials you are using?

N: Styrofoam, wooden skewers, straws, mobile phone batteries, and e-waste.

[Recently Niki has been making robots that paint]

C: How do you see the action of the robot painting as cultural critique?

N: I propose new ways for looking at technology.  For example, a lot of people think, you can do anything with a good programming language. In reality, you are limited to what the producer of that language could conceptualize.

C: The robot acts as an intermediary, creating distance between you and the final painting. I assume you are thinking about technology mediating relationships and how we connect emotionally or disconnect.

N:  How we communicate and use technology nowadays, is the wrong way because we connect, mainly over software which has a reason. That reason is to make money. It might be a social software but the intention is different. There used to be couch surfing for free. The next idea was Airbnb, which was a good idea, but businesses were destroyed and in many cities the rents have increased.

C: It points to a global issue, of prioritizing short term consumer experience over long term sustainability.

N: It’s subjectivism, vs objectivism. The idea that everything that I would like to have and consume is inherently good.

_MG_9910

C: The lines these days are a bit blurred, but a lack of specific function is often inherent to what defines art, as opposed to design or craft. How do you think about the function of your robots? Aren’t they unnecessary?

N: I come from the classical music world. An instrument is a very elaborate technological device. Even when you use that machine to create music, you interpret the composition. The musician, is a very small element in the whole system. There could be a billion musicians, but the way they interpret the work is special.

C: The point is not to make a painting.

N: I tried it, it’s not something that I like. I really enjoy the traces of the robots, they take two to three hours. It might be the same amount of time for me to make it myself, but I prefer if the robot makes it. It’s a very intense, emotional time for me. The reason for having the robots paint, is the connection to the idea of trace and cave painting. Everything the robots do is recorded by the trace, it is the abstract form of each robot's movement.

C: You create the robots with some intentional element of failure?

N: Yes, I realized that if there are small mistakes in the form, the behavior changes and it becomes very lifelike. My theory is that every great idea came out of a misunderstanding of something.

C: Are you open about the code and the technical process?

N: I come out of the open source world. If you look at the score for a piece of music, that is the source code of the piece. In some cases, I write code onto the gallery wall. Calling it a score can help you see code differently. It’s more interesting to create scores for machines, than a very dry, technical code.

Niki_paint_robot2

C: The world of technology is still very male dominated, and your robots are working with the abstract expressionist language, which is also a male dominated language. Specifically this idea of the paintbrush as phallus is a reminder of this.

N: I’m looking forward to the conversation here in the United States, because Jackson Pollock is not so important in my world and I’m not coming out of that tradition. I was never a painter. I’m interested in the gesture, but not what a painter thinks is a gesture.

C: Your work reminds me of Yves Klein, with the traces of  bodies on canvas, performance in the gallery space, musical scores, neo-dada style happenings; also Nam June Paik releasing a robot into the street to be hit by a car.  It’s an event, alive and organic.

N: There’s no instructions for the evening. If you don’t look closely it would seem like a normal opening reception, with the artist present. It’s more subtle and I wouldn’t want it to be otherwise.

Niki Passath teaches Interface Design at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Christina Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Haverford College in Pennsylvania. Both are currently artists-in-residence at Flux Factory in New York, where Niki will be leading a robotics workshop on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, followed by an opening reception and exhibition: http://www.fluxfactory.org/events/robot-making-workshop/

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BAU AT CAMARGO ARTS RESIDENCY AWARD

In 2014 BAU Institute launched a new arts residency hosted by the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. The Residency provides BAU Institute funded Fellowships for the realization of projects in the arts. There is no cost to attend. Creative practioners demonstrating a serious commitment to their practice and a desire to work independently within an international community are welcome to apply. The BAU at Camargo Fellowship provides artists with live-work apartments at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. at no cost.
A public exhibition and reading/performance will be held at FiveMyles gallery in Brooklyn, NY in January 2017 to showcase the new work created at the residency.

2016 RESIDENCY DATES
August 1 – August 22.

DEADLINE:
On-line applications are accepted between December 7, 2015 and March 15, 2016 at 11:59PM EST online via submittable:
https://bauinstitute.submittable.com/submit

COSTS
There is a $40.00 application fee. Notification of the admission committee decision will be in mid April. Upon acceptance a refundable security deposit of $250.00 is due.
BAU at Camargo provides live/work housing at no cost. There is no fee to attend.

ELIGIBILITY
BAU Institute welcomes international applicants. The residency supports the development of work in the Visual Arts (including photography, video and new media), Creative Writing, Dramatic Writing, Performance and Musical Composition. The residency may accommodate up to 15 people at a time. Fellowship selections are determined by a rotating panel of discipline specific professionals.

For more information please visit the BAU Institute website:
http://www.bauinstitute.org
http://www.bauinstitute.org/index.php?page=cassis-france


BAU Institute is a non-profit 501(3)C based in New York City. The mission of the BAU Institute is to support visual artists, creative and dramatic writers, composers, performance artists and other arts professionals in the creation and exhibition of new work. BAU Institute offers residencies in France and Italy to provide uninterrupted time and space for the development of new work in settings of cultural interest and extraordinary natural beauty.

 

Open Call – IMRC Researcher in Residence Program Fall 2016

The Innovative Media Research and Commercialization Center (IMRC) is now accepting applications for their biannual Researcher in Residency Program (RRP). Ideal for creative technologists, Intermedia artists, and New Media producers, this 8 to 12-week program takes place every Fall and Spring at the IMRC Center in Orono, Maine.

The residency supports a period of concentration and immersion in creative investigation, cutting-edge research or production of visionary, experimental applications and projects. Potential initiatives might range from live Intermedia productions, sound and physical computing works to technical prototypes, installations and tactical media events. The RRP is committed to supporting a diverse and broad ranging creative environment. We consequently encourage applications from the broadest possible range of individuals to creative technologists to this program.

Accepted awardees are awarded a stipend, studio space, and 24/7 access to the multimillion dollar, state of the art IMRC’s, studio spaces, fabrication and prototyping labs, and more.

The Fall 2016 application opens on Monday, December 14th and closes on Tuesday, January 14th. For eligibility requirements, application instructions and more information, please visit www.imrccenter.com/researcher-in-residence

The IMRC is a hub for learning, creating and producing. It is the most recent of the portfolio of the University of Maine’s facilities that support innovation and economic development. The IMRC Center is supported by a range of expert instructors and a community of collaborators.


 

Located on the University of Maine Campus the Innovative Media, Research and Commercialization Center (IMRC Center), at Stewart Commons,  is a 15,000+ square foot facility provides comfortable, state of the art prototyping facilities, audio and video production spaces, a resource library, performance and installation spaces, classrooms, and offices. IMRC is outfitted with a variety of tools and equipment, including a full shop, 3D printers and 3D scanner, computer controlled machine tools, a cutting and engraving laser, plastic vacuum former, large format printers, a range of design and production software, electronics workbenches, video and still cameras, audio recording and mixing equipment, and a variety of tools for supporting interactive environments and installations. Opened in 2013 the IMRC Center is a hub for learning, creating and producing and is the most recent of the portfolio of the University of Maine’s facilities that support innovation and economic development. The IMRC Center is supported by a range of expert instructors and a community of collaborators to help you problem-solve and achieve your vision, and it has everything necessary for you to research, invent, create, and innovate!

 

Signal Culture Artist, Researcher and Toolmaker in Residence Applications Now Available

Signal Culture is an experimental media art residency located in Owego, New York. We are now accepting applications for our Artist, Researcher and Toolmaker in Residence programs for the Spring/Summer 2016 season.

Artist In Residence Program

The Artist Studio features a wide range of media tools, both new and old, for use in a real time audio/video/data processing system. Our philosophy is to create a space for experimentation and for artists to develop a dialogue with the range of tools available. As such, we do not expect artists to create finished works, rather we encourage our residents to spend time exploring conceptual and material practices. We do not accept undergraduate students or Masters degree candidates.

Researcher In Residence Program

Researchers can be art historians, curators, critics, archivists, preservationists, writers who want to know more about media practices or artists who are spending time learning more about material or theoretical concerns surrounding media. This program also has access to the Toolmaker equipment, including a wide variety of electronic components, media devices, cameras and other items of interest. In addition to time and space to conduct research, Signal Culture is building both online and on-site research centers to provide our residents with a variety of digital and printed materials. We provide free WiFi. We do not accept undergraduate students or Masters degree candidates.

Toolmaker In Residence Program

The toolmaker studio offers access to a variety of spare parts, electronic components, IC’s, soldering equipment, Raspberry Pi computers, Arduino and Making Things boards, sensors, etc. There can be access to both Mac & PC computers available, but it is suggested that you contact us with specific questions if you require specialized equipment. Eligible toolmaker applicants can include, but are not limited to hackers, circuit benders, software developers, engineers, and audio or visual instrument builders. We do not accept undergraduate students or Masters degree candidates. In addition, if you are an artist who is looking to figure out an interactive interface, design an installation environment, build a system of sensors or learn to program a specific piece of software for use in your art and you do not have a reason to use the artist in residence studio system, this is a good program for you.

Resident spaces feature:

  • Shared kitchen, common area, dining room and deck
  • Private bedrooms and work spaces
  • Private bathroom for researcher/toolmaker residents, shared bathroom for artist residencies
  • Shared fridge, pantry, kitchen appliances & dishes
  • Shared library of printed, digital and time based media
  • Easy access to shopping and events in Owego
  • For more information about the facilities, go to http://signalculture.org/facilities.html

Signal Culture is located 3.5 hours northwest of New York City. There is no fee for the residency, but you are responsible for your own transportation and for all your expenses.

Learn about our past residents: http://signalculture.org/residency.html

Deadline for applications is November 1st, 2015 @ 11:59pm EST.

Download our applications here: http://signalculture.org/apply.html


Signal Culture is a non profit organization that encourages the creation of new work, building of community, and connection to history in the field of experimental media art by providing artists, researchers, and innovators with residencies, resources, and exhibition opportunities.

Call for Proposals : Chronus Art Center Research & Creation Fellowship

Deadline: July 15, 2015

Call Type: Fellowship
Start Date: 05/15/2015

2015 (Fall) Research and Creation Fellowship – Chronus Art Center

APPLICATION DEADLINE
All applications must be received electronically by 23:59 (Beijing Time), Wednesday, July 15, 2015via fellowship@chronusartcenter.org.
Applicants will be informed of their application status by August 15, 2015.

FELLOWSHIP BEGINS
September 20, 2015 (starting date negotiable within reason)

OVERVIEW
This 12-month fellowship program is designed to host international artists and researchers of extraordinary talent working in the area of new media art in order to conduct research and creation at Chronus Art Center (CAC) in Shanghai. The Research and Creation Fellowship aims to advance the experimental nature of media art, contribute to CAC’s research and educational mission, foster global exchange, and explore new models collecting new media art work.

The Fall 2015 Season Fellowship will sponsor one international artist/researcher (individual or team) to engage with the Shanghai and other Chinese art, and technology communities. The selected Fellow will be expected to work in CAC’s laboratory with CAC’s research and creation team on a range of activities including: active contribution to the larger CAC community, collaborative partnership with other residents, leading research initiatives, educational programs and public engagement, and developing current or future research areas for the organization. Developed projects, including prototypes, documentation, and work-in-progress, will be presented to the public at Chronus Art Center.

FELLOWSHIP FOCUS
In the inaugural year of the Research and Creation Fellowship program, we are seeking exploratory and innovative proposals that explore artistic applications of emerging technologies, and have the potential to engage CAC and the public to learn alongside artists and creative technologists developing thought-provoking work. Proposed projects should relate to one or multiple of the following areas:

1. Emotive Networks & Haptic Gaming: Using networking and Internet technologies to share biofeedback data (EEG and ECG as well as other body-based sensors, wearable technology, etc.) and physical computing to create body-actuators (haptic and force feedback) in order to produce expanded/immersive gaming and telematic experiences, performances, interactive objects and responsive environments.

2. Generative Art and Big Data: online back-end (server), front-end (interface) programming and internet enabled hardware/objects focused on the development of real-time data-mining and scrapping applications, generative art, interactive installations and dynamic sculptures, which utilize and process data using swarming, flocking, machine learning and genetic algorithms.

3. Intelligent Audio-visual Systems: Augmented and virtual reality, mobile technology and/or custom hardware to explore non-linear, experimental narratives in cinema, T.V, mobile devices and other media. Autonomous audiovisual and/or music systems that make use of participatory dynamics, in both physical and virtual spaces and explore the use of the large-scale, 360 degree projection system located at CAC.

4. Existential Technologies: This line of research explores the use of wearable technology, robotics, interactive media and physical computing in order to examine fundamental ontological questions regarding the nature of reality and human perception; synesthesia, sensory substitution, sensory augmentation, etc.

5. It from bit: Aesthetic objects that examine the ideas of simulation and representation through the hybridization of digital and physical forms. The transmutation of bits into atoms and vice-versa becomes the exploration of new forms of art in the field of mixed and mediated reality through physical computing, VR and AR.

FELLOWSHIP SUPPORT
One selected Fellow (either as an individual or as a team) will be offered a total amount of USD30,000 grant for a period of one year to cover travel, accommodation and stipend, including materials during his/her residency in Shanghai.

CAC will provide the necessary paperwork and advice for the process of visa application and help identify local accommodation in Shanghai.

CAC will work closely with the selected Fellow to ensure the realization of the proposed project and offer program support in developing work for performance, events, seminars, exhibitions, or other public and educational programming during the term of the Fellowship. CAC will also partner with appropriate local and neighbor organizations, facilitate joint presentations of works-in-progress, host conversations with the artists and display works in progress, revealing the creative process as it happens.

All fellowship related activities will be documented and archived for future publications.

ELIGIBILITY
-This fellowship is open to international artists and researchers.
- Applicants are expected to demonstrate previous experience in the development of similar projects.
- Individuals and collaborative teams are invited to apply. In either case, please detail in your application how technical and creative responsibilities will be met.

APPLICATION GUIDELINE
Please fill out and submit the application form online here (https://docs.google.com/forms/d/18jCSuDuwLhsvJR9EV7q2tYpYIThHa2zdQGZAIjKLSco/viewform) and send other supporting materials as email attachments in PDF format to: fellowship@chronusartcenter.org

Complete applications must include the following materials:
- Application Form. Please indicate in the application form the focus area(s) of your proposed project by choosing from CAC’s five areas of concentration;
- Resume or CV in PDF format. If applying as a collaborative team, please include information about team members’ relevant prior experience and combine CVs into a single document.
- One PDF document with visuals that further outline the proposal(less than 30M). For visual materials (images, schematics, renderings, etc.) that exceed 30M, please provide URLs. Video files (.mov, mp4) of less than 5 minutes in length will also be accepted in URLs. Please indicate URL passwords if any.
- Portfolio or Work samples. Include project descriptions with your portfolio or work samples that explains how it relates to your proposed project(s)/research. Combine all descriptions with URLs and passwords into one PDF document. You may use a free hosting service such as Flickr (flickr.com) for images, SoundCloud (soundcloud.com) for audio, or Vimeo (vimeo.com) for video.

NOTE: Allow permission to download a high quality version of file if using one of these 3rd party services. Alternatively, you may provide a link to your own page with high quality versions of your work samples available for review and download.

EVALUATION CRITERIA
Applications will be reviewed by CAC International Advisory Board comprised of leading scholars, artists and museum professionals. Acceptance is based on artistic excellence, quality, feasibility and visionary potential. The successful applicant will outline clear goals, milestones and timelines.

Please send further inquires to: fellowship@chronusartcenter.org

About Chronus Art Center

Established in 2013, Chronus Art Center (CAC) is China’s first nonprofit art organization dedicated to the presentation, research / creation and scholarship of media art. CAC with its exhibitions, residency-oriented fellowships, lectures and workshop programs and through its archiving and publishing initiatives, creates a multifaceted and vibrant platform for the discourse, production and dissemination of media art in a global context. CAC is positioned to advance artistic innovation and cultural awareness by critically engaging with media technologies that are transforming and reshaping contemporary experiences.

http://www.chronusartcenter.org

Call for Entries – NEO FUTURE Theme residency in Finland, March/April 2016

NEO FUTURE: Arteles special theme residency program
For artists and creators of the future, especially from the fields of

Sci-Fi New Media | Electronic Sound | Design
Literature | Visual Arts | Concept Art | Science

Periods: 1 or 2 months
When: March / April 2016

Deadline for applications:
17th June 2015

Alternate Futures

Utopians, dark dystopians, transhumanists and cyborgs. Space travel and other galaxies. Singularity. Retro-futurism and future societies – after artificial intelligence, after apocalypse, after art?

Neo Future program brings together international, future-oriented artists & creators. Located in the middle of nowhere in rural Finland, Arteles Creative Center serves as the ideal place to envision, outline and work on your own futuristic sceneries and scenarios. Share approaches and get inspired with other artists and visionaires willing to go beyond here & now, to come up with something 'neo'.

The pre-defined structure of the program is flexible. Depending on your own preference and interests, you can aim at on-site collaborations, or concentrate intensively on your own practice and ideas. In either case, the emphasis is on your own creative process and development – there is no pressure to produce finalized works.

Creative Space in the Nature

Arteles Creative Center is located in Haukijärvi, a part of the rural county of Hämeenkyrö in Finland. The region represents authentic Finnish countryside with beautiful landscapes, forests and lakes. Many artists have found the place, its soundscape and atmosphere so inspiring that it will become part of their work one way or the other.

In March and April, the Finnish Winter is finally easening up its grip and the nature starts to wake up from its sleep. The amount of daylight is growing rapidly. The Milky Way, shooting stars and satellites are clearly visible on the dark night sky. If you are lucky, you may even catch the Northern lights – early Spring is a peak season for them.

How to apply

In the selection process an emphasis is put on the applicant´s ideas & approach. You need to be interested and/or working around the theme one way or the other. We are looking for creative minds widely from different fields and backgrounds. If you are applying as a duo/couple, filling one application is enough - in this case, include information on both applicants in the same form.

In general we are open to raw ideas and long term 'work in progress' approaches as we understand that the future is unpredictable and artist's work and projects are in constant flux and tend to live along the way.

More Detailed information on the residency available on the organization website.

Signal Culture Artist, Researcher and Toolmaker in Residence Applications Now Available

Signal Culture is an experimental media art residency located in Owego, New York. We are now accepting applications for our Artist, Researcher and Toolmaker in Residence programs for the Fall 2015 - Winter 2016 season.

Artist In Residence Program:
The Signal Culture Artist in Residence program offers time, space and studio access for artists in the field of experimental media art. The Artist Studio features a wide range of media tools, both new and old, for use in a real time audio/video/data processing system. Our philosophy is to create a space for experimentation and for artists to develop a dialogue with the range of tools available. As such, we do not expect artists to create finished works, rather we encourage our residents to spend time exploring conceptual and material practices. We do not accept undergraduate students or Masters degree candidates.

Researcher In Residence Program:
The Signal Culture Researcher in Residence program offers time, space and materials for people researching the field of experimental media art. Eligible applicants can include, but are not limited to historians, curators, archivists, preservationists, critics and theorists. We do not accept applications from undergraduate students or Masters degree candidates.

In addition to time and space to conduct research, Signal Culture is building both online and on-site research centers to provide our residents with a variety of digital and printed materials. You will also have access to the researcher/toolmaker studio. While you will have access to a computer, we suggest you bring your own. We provide free WiFi.

Toolmaker In Residence Program:
The Signal Culture Toolmaker in Residence program offers time, space and toolmaker studio access for people making devices or software used in the production of experimental media art. Eligible applicants can include, but are not limited to hackers, circuit benders, software developers, robotics engineers, and audio or visual instrument builders. We do not accept applications from undergraduate students or Masters degree candidates.

Signal Culture does not require any Toolmaker in Residence to donate their creations. Toolmaker residents developing physical objects or software during their residency will retain all intellectual property rights. If a Toolmaker wishes to donate a prototype for use in the Signal Culture studios, we will graciously accept the gift.

In addition to the artist studio, Resident spaces feature:
- Shared kitchen, common area, dining room and deck
- A private bedroom and work space
- Private bathroom for researcher/toolmaker residents, shared bathroom for artist residencies
- Shared fridge, pantry, kitchen appliances & dishes
- Shared library of printed, digital and time based media
- Easy access to shopping and events in Owego
For more information about the facilities, go to
http://signalculture.org/facilities.html

Signal Culture is located 3.5 hours northwest of New York City. There is no fee for the residency, but you are responsible for your own transportation and for all your expenses.

Learn about our past residents:
http://signalculture.org/air.html
http://signalculture.org/rir.html
http://signalculture.org/tir.html

Deadline for applications is May 1st @ 11:55pm EST.
Download the application here: http://signalculture.org/apply.html


 

Signal Culture is an experimental media arts organization and residency program that encourages creation of new work, building of community, and connection to history in the field of experimental media art by providing artists, researchers, and innovators with residencies, resources, and exhibition opportunities.